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  #11  
Old 01-21-2019, 07:02 PM
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bloup101 bloup101 is offline
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I've always been told to run trailer tires at max specifications and yes torsion suspension seems to have a bigger impact on sidewalls when in a radius backup.
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  #12  
Old 01-21-2019, 10:22 PM
KMS KMS is offline
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Honestly, I think the biggest problem with the trailer tires is, people keep them too long. Every single tire on every single vehicle I own, gets thrown in the dumpster after five years no matter how good they look.

I too have not had any problems with the Marathons (probably because I don't keep them past five years) I know there are a lot of horror stories. Goodyear has discontinued the Marathon and has replaced it with the Endurance. From what I've read, it has really great reviews and they're made in the USA. So that's what I bought.
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  #13  
Old 01-22-2019, 10:55 AM
BudmanV24 BudmanV24 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roadster02 View Post
Get rid of the expensive, lousy, trailer tires and use LT tires.
Trailer tires are designed to be able to slide sideways when making tight turns. LT tires do not. Speaking from experience, this is a good way to eat bearings on a heavily loaded trailer
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  #14  
Old 01-22-2019, 01:02 PM
roadster02 roadster02 is offline
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Never had a problem at any time with bearings or tires and I have had four trailers that were tandem axle, and one that was single axle. Trailer tires are an expensive B.S story. IMHO
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  #15  
Old 01-22-2019, 02:09 PM
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Thrall Thrall is offline
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I believe generally, max pressure is best and that's usually what I do...BUT, in the OP's case, the tires he's running are what? about 1000lbs greater load rating than his actual loads, per tire.
Air hold the load up, not the tire, and if a given load is able to be held with sufficient stability at say 35psi in the OP's case then the tire will be stiff enough at pressures over that minimum pressure. Not suggesting 35psi as that just seems way low and it IS the minimum, so it's low. But splitting the difference between the min required and max allowable pressure seems like a good compromise to keep flex and heat to a minimum and not rattle the cupboard doors open over every expansion joint and pothole in the road.
At some point, too much is too much. Like 80 psi in the back tires of an empty pickup truck. 80 psi won't hurt the tire or rim (save for possible center tread wear due to over inflation for the given load), but it will beat the heck out of the rest of the truck and the occupants.
For practical experience, I have a tandem axle trailer for snowmachines that is lightly loaded for it's size and gvw. Tires are 65psi tires. OE tires were 50psi tires and by a load chart I probably only need 30-35psi minimum. Been running the 65psi tires around 45-50psi for years now. No problems.
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  #16  
Old 01-22-2019, 02:14 PM
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Thrall Thrall is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roadster02 View Post
Never had a problem at any time with bearings or tires and I have had four trailers that were tandem axle, and one that was single axle. Trailer tires are an expensive B.S story. IMHO
Even though it's obvious that you'd argue the sky is not blue when 100 out of 100 people said "blue", go find me a nice LT 14" tire with anywhere near the capacity of the available 14" ST tires on the market. Or ANY 14" LT tire for that fact.
Then jump to 15" tires and doo the same. You'll find some LTs, but nowhere near the load capacity and stiffness of a D load rated 15" ST tire.
Thanks for playing....
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  #17  
Old 01-22-2019, 03:48 PM
jharmon203 jharmon203 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lakedrum03 View Post
10% less than max pressure. Any tire, anywhere, any time.
I would have to respectfully disagree with you on this.

Different tires are made for different applications.

For your car, you should read the sticker on it to see what you should properly inflate them to.

As for trailer tires, I have heard multiple reports that getting near the max rating is the best option as that's what the tires are designed to be at. You can go under a bit of you want, but that's really what they are designed to be at. I don't release pressure during storage either.
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  #18  
Old 01-22-2019, 06:50 PM
roadster02 roadster02 is offline
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Then use a passenger car tire. Still better than those expensive trailer tires. I started pulling trailers (work and recreation) when I was 20, in 40 years I have probably learned a little something about them. I've probably forgotten more about trailers than you even know. Just trying to pass on a little sage advice. No argument from me, buy the high priced crappy "trailer" tires, suit yourself. No skin off my nose.




Quote:
Originally Posted by Thrall View Post
Even though it's obvious that you'd argue the sky is not blue when 100 out of 100 people said "blue", go find me a nice LT 14" tire with anywhere near the capacity of the available 14" ST tires on the market. Or ANY 14" LT tire for that fact.
Then jump to 15" tires and doo the same. You'll find some LTs, but nowhere near the load capacity and stiffness of a D load rated 15" ST tire.
Thanks for playing....
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  #19  
Old 01-22-2019, 06:57 PM
John Johnson John Johnson is online now
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As a lawyer, albeit a very mediocre one, I would use the tire called for the application. If God forbid you have an accident after a blowout and take another car out, your case is much easier to defend than Escort-Tire-On-7k-Trailer and they have another target for a products claim. Just.02.
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  #20  
Old 01-22-2019, 07:10 PM
John Johnson John Johnson is online now
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Also I think the load stress on the other under rated tire after a blowout and sway is a concern too. But I have nothing to back that up.
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