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Old 05-17-2019, 01:43 PM
jgsully jgsully is offline
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Join Date: May 2019
Boat: 1989 190
Location: New England
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Engine Replacement

I have a 89 Mastercraft with a Ford 351. Boat was last in the water fall of 2017. End of season I waited too long to get the boat out and didn't winterize fast enough, it sat for a week when the weather dipped below freezing a few times. Post winterization I checked the oil and it was milky. I had not checked it before so I had hoped that it was because of a missing exhaust flap. After that I put the boat in storage and I deployed to Germany for a year.

Now I'm back and the family wants to get back on the water. I pulled the boat out and built a small device to pressurize the block. I put in 20lbs of air and let it sit, it stayed for a bit, but within 5 minutes the air started to leak out. I am pretty sure that the block is cracked.

Kids want to ski soon and I am on a budget so I am looking at putting in a junk-yard van/truck engine. I have the Memorial Day weekend coming that I could probably get the work done.

My questions are as follows:

Is this something that is workable for the short term ( a season or two )?

Pull engine and tranny together or separate in boat and pull engine alone?

Which parts swaps are required? Advised?

Is this too stupid for words?

all recommendation/advise etc is welcome.

our use is pretty light, kids are young and just learning to ski and I dont get out much and have a bad shoulder at the moment so may be even less this year.

Thanks in advance
Jay
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Old 05-19-2019, 11:18 AM
jgsully jgsully is offline
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Join Date: May 2019
Boat: 1989 190
Location: New England
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No advice or opinions? Perhaps its because I'm a new poster here?

Update - called junk yards all around, found a guy who has a couple of 351's not too far away so I am looking at picking one up Friday morning.

I'll start removing things from the boat this week. I'm planing on using a chainfall to pick the motor out from a ceiling. Looking at pulling the exhaust manifolds and risers with engine in the boat.

So - any advice?
Jay
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  #3  
Old 05-19-2019, 11:23 AM
Shaun R's Avatar
Shaun R Shaun R is online now
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The motor can be made to work, just make sure and use brass freeze plugs and all the marine fuel and accessory items. Automotive carbs, starters and alternators are a no-no on marine motors.
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Old 05-19-2019, 11:54 AM
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03 35th Anniversary 03 35th Anniversary is offline
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See below

Quote:
Originally Posted by jgsully View Post
I have a 89 Mastercraft with a Ford 351. Boat was last in the water fall of 2017. End of season I waited too long to get the boat out and didn't winterize fast enough, it sat for a week when the weather dipped below freezing a few times. Post winterization I checked the oil and it was milky. I had not checked it before so I had hoped that it was because of a missing exhaust flap. After that I put the boat in storage and I deployed to Germany for a year.

Now I'm back and the family wants to get back on the water. I pulled the boat out and built a small device to pressurize the block. I put in 20lbs of air and let it sit, it stayed for a bit, but within 5 minutes the air started to leak out. I am pretty sure that the block is cracked.

Kids want to ski soon and I am on a budget so I am looking at putting in a junk-yard van/truck engine. I have the Memorial Day weekend coming that I could probably get the work done.

My questions are as follows:

Is this something that is workable for the short term ( a season or two ). Yes, might have to reuse the timing cover off the engine in the boat for the manual fuel pump slot.

Pull engine and tranny together or separate in boat and pull engine alone? Together

Which parts swaps are required? Advised? Reuse your intake, carb, water pump (if it didnít freeze and crack), distributor, starter, alternator and all the marine water jacketing. Probably need to order a gasket set just to be safe.

Is this too stupid for words? Not at all.

all recommendation/advise etc is welcome.

our use is pretty light, kids are young and just learning to ski and I dont get out much and have a bad shoulder at the moment so may be even less this year.

Thanks in advance
Jay
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  #5  
Old 05-19-2019, 12:19 PM
FrankSchwab FrankSchwab is offline
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Boat: 1998 Maristar 200VRS
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Well, there's the really red-neck approach: Don't do anything. Does the engine turn over? Does the engine run? What's the problem?

So you have a crack in the block, with water getting into the oil. No Big Deal - it's not good for long-term engine reliability; but with a 30-year old cracked engine that's not really such a concern. How much worse is it going to get by using it in it's current condition?

How bad is the water leak? If there's so much water that it's coming out the dipstick after half an hour on the water, then you can't take this approach; but if it's only a little bit of water turning the oil milky after a season, perhaps you can get away with simply changing oil often - maybe even after every weekend depending on the leak rate. You may not have the best performing engine on the lake - but you'll have a boat that runs with near-zero cost in time and money.

If you want to do the work to swap in a junkyard engine, I agree with 03 35th - it'll work fine. Pull the engine and transmission together. For safety, you'll want to use the Marine Carb, Starter, Alternator, and perhaps fuel pump - you don't want the boat going "Boom" when it's loaded with kids. There are other marine-specific items on the old engine (water circulation pump, freeze plugs, etc) that you can use or not - if you use the ones on the junkyard engine, they'll rust out reasonably quickly (perhaps 1-5 years, depending on how corrosive the water you boat in is). The junkyard engine won't have the marine-specific cam in it, so the boat will be down on power but that is unlikely to be a problem on a Prostar. Swap in the marine spark plugs.

Good luck.
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Old 05-19-2019, 12:28 PM
FrankSchwab FrankSchwab is offline
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Note that, for a point of reference, here's a price for a rebuilt marine long block:
https://www.summitracing.com/parts/hme-dma1/overview/
You can evaluate that price against the junkyard price, and consider the labor and longevity you'll get each way.
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  #7  
Old 05-19-2019, 12:31 PM
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JohnnyB JohnnyB is offline
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Can you physically see the crack or is it internal?

More info on the existing damage may help with a short term fix suggestion to get you on the water.

Thanks for serving our country!

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  #8  
Old 05-19-2019, 12:55 PM
gweaver gweaver is offline
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If you have a choice, I believe the engine in your boat is more similar to a truck engine than a car engine. (Windsor vs. Cleveland assembly.) If you can find an engine from a similar year, use the 'new' block/rotating assembly and just swap everything over. If you're mechanically inclined, you can pull the cam from your existing engine and swap that over to the new one. As others have mentioned, you'll want to swap all accessories over as well- starter, alternator, carb, fuel pump, etc. Might need to swap the intake manifold as well, depending on if the replacement engine had a 2 or 4 barrel carb. I'm not sure but I think the oil pan is different as well, but when you have both engines side by side, you can compare to be sure. In any case, it shouldn't be too difficult. If you've got access to air tools, that may make the job easier. Make sure you start spraying all your bolts and fasteners with penetrating oil now, so they're easier to remove when the time comes.

Thank you for your service.

G
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  #9  
Old 05-20-2019, 09:58 PM
jgsully jgsully is offline
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Join Date: May 2019
Boat: 1989 190
Location: New England
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Thanks for the information and advice!

Regarding the crack. Its not something I can see, I assume its internal - which is giving me the milky oil, but I really don't know. I have a line on a motor that I am going to get Friday morning coming out of a van. I assume van and truck engines have the same cams.

I'll take some pictures and post my progress here (and probably ask for help)

Thanks Jay
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