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View Full Version : Engine overheat on 2016 X30


DrascoX30
04-23-2017, 08:56 AM
Hey guys. First post.
After running my 2016 X30 for the first time this season I had a problem. After about 15 minutes of running it at about 20mph it started to run rough, have an odor, and then within a few seconds an alarm went off saying to return to the dock because my coolant temp was too high. Looking at my engine temp gauge it was pegged at 240. Also the bilge pump started running continuously and the carpet below my feet became soaking wet. My boat had just been de-winterized by my Mastercraft dealer the week prior. I had a friend tow me in and I turned the engine back on for about 20 seconds just to get the boat up on my lift. I called the dealer and they sent two guys right over.

It turns out that the hose running from the sea pump to the engine was had not been reattached properly and came loose so my engine was not getting cooled and the pump was filling my boat up with water. They immediately took responsibility for the mistake.

Even after sitting without running for 45-50 minutes the engine temp gauge was still pegged at 240. They reattached the hose but did not run the engine at that time for fear of pumping cold water into an overheated engine. They came back a few days later, ran the engine briefly on the lift and called back to say everything is now fine.

I'm skeptical however. They did not perform a lake test or run a compression test, etc.
They are waiting on a replacement part from Mastercraft and then I asked them to test it further.

I guess my question is has anyone had an experience like this? What should I be concerned about? I have grave concerns that even though the engine might run well now that damage may have been done that won't manifest until later. I have some familiarity with the typical things that can go wrong with an engine overheat such as head gasket breaking, coolant leaking, etc. I was told that the lack of aluminum in the Ilmor engine makes it much more resistant to overheating damage and I'm sure that's true.

Anyway, sorry for the long post. I'd appreciate any advice or insight anyone can give.

CantRepeat
04-23-2017, 09:10 AM
Document everything in writing and photos. If by chance something major is messed up you have a log of it. I'd ask for something in writing from dealer acknowledging the fact they messed up on the dewinterizing, just in case you need it later on.

Chances are it's ok. The ECMs have defaults to reduce power when something is not reading correctly. As long as you shut it off at 240 degrees and got towed back you should be ok.

MC25
04-23-2017, 10:03 AM
Sounds like they're treating you right so far. Like Cr said, just keep a log of what happened if they don't.

2RLAKE
04-23-2017, 10:35 AM
Engines are fairly durable

In the future the best thing is to get it running again and get the temperature back down vs letting it just sit there and bake

Shaun R
04-23-2017, 11:22 AM
Water is only half the cooling in your engine, your oil takes care of the other half. You will know quickly if something was damaged due to an overheat and most likely it will just be a head gasket.

jgraham37128
04-23-2017, 11:23 AM
I see this happen every year on my lake. When I start my boat for the first time, I always open up the hatches while it's on the trailer to make sure water isn't pumping in. You will know from here on out to do this, luckily it's never happened to me but I see someone every year doing this. Last year it was a brand new x10 they guy used it once in the fall and had it winterized and this was his second day on the water (spring) he wasn't happy with the dealer. I talked to him a few weeks later and he said it ended up being ok, it melted a few plastic pieces but that was all.

CantRepeat
04-23-2017, 12:01 PM
I agree, checking under the hood each time the boat is launched/first use of the day is a good idea. Likewise, getting familure with the basic operation of the engine and cooling system is a must. Knowing where hoses go and what it looks like when it's right is also a must.

Silverdawg
04-24-2017, 09:08 PM
Something similar happened to me as well a few years back. Had the boat winterized, then prepared for the spring by the same dealer. Forgot to attach the dreaded hose and the boat overheated while just off the ramp. Warning chimes alerted me and we quickly checked under the "hood" and saw the hose not attached properly. Pissed me off to no end and I did not use that dealer again for service. So easy, but so many dealer "techs" miss it. I always keep it on the trailer now after getting it serviced to ensure it is all clear before casting off.

jgraham37128
04-24-2017, 09:25 PM
Something similar happened to me as well a few years back. Had the boat winterized, then prepared for the spring by the same dealer. Forgot to attach the dreaded hose and the boat overheated while just off the ramp. Warning chimes alerted me and we quickly checked under the "hood" and saw the hose not attached properly. Pissed me off to no end and I did not use that dealer again for service. So easy, but so many dealer "techs" miss it. I always keep it on the trailer now after getting it serviced to ensure it is all clear before casting off.

Me too, and I also pull the center cover just to keep checking once I pull off the trailer.

lashburn1
04-24-2017, 09:29 PM
One of these days I'm going to march right down to my dealer and ask him what de-winterize means

mikeg205
04-24-2017, 09:48 PM
attach hoses and take money.. ;)

Thrall
04-25-2017, 12:04 PM
In general, if you overheat an iron block engine, first damage will be exhaust hoses, then impeller, then engine.
Its highly probable that if you didn't crisp the inside of the exhaust hoses then the engine didn't run hot long enough to hurt the internals.