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roadster02
05-22-2014, 07:34 PM
I am continually amazed at how many males do not know a dang thing about the mechanics of their boats, cars, or anything they drive, or operate. How do you guys go on long road trips, get out in the middle of a lake, ride your motorbikes anywhere out of town, or fly your aircraft a thousand feet up and NOT know a thing about how the machine you are using operates??? What do you do operate on faith? Personally if I can't do normal maintenance, fix the usual simple repair items, and have no understanding how it operates, I won't use, or own the vehicle. Good God guys, learn something about the "magical" way your things run, it's not brain surgery. Sure some things are beyond the normal and must be researched, asked about on this forum, or even taken to a mechanic, but most problems are simple in nature. C'mon learn about your toys, otherwise you look like a bunch of pusses.

jafo9
05-22-2014, 07:37 PM
is there a story behind this?

roadster02
05-22-2014, 07:39 PM
Inquiring minds want to know. Not trying to stir up trouble just wondering. I met two guys on our local ramp yesterday that knew nothing, absolutely nothing about their boat which would not start. My wife actually was able to give them some answers while I was getting the truck and trailer. I was just astonished.

waterlogged882
05-22-2014, 07:42 PM
..........

73blue
05-22-2014, 07:50 PM
Personally if I can't do normal maintenance, fix the usual simple repair items, and have no understanding how it operates, I won't use, or own the vehicle.

On the other hand, it is very difficult to learn even simple things like routine maintenance without first owning and/or using something

waterlogged882
05-22-2014, 07:54 PM
..........

roadster02
05-22-2014, 08:05 PM
C'mon, most internal combustion engines share common maintenance, and operating characteristics that allow one to be versed in the operation, and repair before owning the item.

On the other hand, it is very difficult to learn even simple things like routine maintenance without first owning and/or using something

73blue
05-22-2014, 08:18 PM
C'mon, most internal combustion engines share common maintenance, and operating characteristics that allow one to be versed in the operation, and repair before owning the item.

Good point. Any advice to help me change the impeller on my bike? Maybe lube the chain on my truck?

Jeff d
05-22-2014, 08:41 PM
I'm the same way. I love to learn about machines, electronics, processes, etc. BTW I'm in IT by trade and us IT guys tend to think we have at least a basic working knowledge of everything in the universe. I like doing my own repairs and maintenance even when I don't necessarily need to in order to pick up a new skill or some new knowledge that might actually be necessary later all while saving anywhere from a few bucks to a few thousand bucks.

That said I've come to the realization that everyone's brains don't work like ours and don't compel them to explore mechanical/electrical/logical systems. There are plenty of people that do very well in our highly evolved society with minds that work on more of an interpersonal level with skills in sales or marketing or management or accounting or entertainment, etc. We have to have those people and my experience has been that, more often than not, the personality traits necessary for those fields tend to be mutually exclusive with mechanical inclination. As bad as they might be at changing a timing belt I'd probably be worse in a sales job. I like to think I'd be more valuable after the zombie apocalypse to meet basic needs and rebuild though.

All that said I do think people, regardless of their natural bent, shouldn't be absolutely clueless about pieces of equipment they choose to operate, both for safety and so they aren't taken advantage of on maintenance or repairs.

Here's a good read on this subject that I ran across the other day:
http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2011/09/13/domestic-outsourcing-practical-or-wussypants/

roadster02
05-22-2014, 08:48 PM
You're kidding right? That's your answer? Sarcastic baloney? Ok, I'll play. Let's change the propeller on your Buick.

Good point. Any advice to help me change the impeller on my bike? Maybe lube the chain on my truck?

f925
05-22-2014, 08:54 PM
I wonder the same thing sometimes but I am so mechanically oriented I can't relate to people who's theory on internal combustion engines is "i put gas in and it goes. When it does't it's broken." I love the trouble shooting of things. With what I have invested in my boat I could have had a much newer vessel. I enjoy the learning and project as much as being on the lake. Ask me to be CEO of a Fortune 500 co. For a week and I think I might bankrupt it.


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ttu
05-22-2014, 09:01 PM
just my opinion, talk about coming across as a a$#! no I am not a mechanic but have learned how to service most of the maintenance issues with all my boats I have owned.

I am sure there might be a things you don't know that I could assist you with without coming across as a ? oh well you know!:rolleyes:

MC25
05-22-2014, 09:29 PM
When it has become cheaper to get my oil changed for less than oil would cost to buy oil is when I stop caring how anything works or how to change the oil. Also when it comes into play of screwing up a warranty, is another reason to not care. Change of times.....

rodltg2
05-22-2014, 09:36 PM
I eat sunflowers seeds in my boat.

roadster02
05-22-2014, 09:38 PM
Good points. But I still would think a person should know enough to not be stranded, or at the mercy of their dealers. The previous owners of my boat took the boat in each year to the dealers for a pre season checkup. The boat sometimes had less than an hour from one year to the next, usually 5 to 10, and yet the dealer would do an oil change, change the spark plugs, overhaul the carburetor, drain out and replace the gas, change the impeller, clean the boat, and charge over 1,000 for this service. I just can't believe an owner would subject himself to such gross thievery. But that's just me, I guess if someone is more well heeled than me it's not a problem. Different strokes. Just trying to understand the mindset.

I wonder the same thing sometimes but I am so mechanically oriented I can't relate to people who's theory on internal combustion engines is "i put gas in and it goes. When it does't it's broken." I love the trouble shooting of things. With what I have invested in my boat I could have had a much newer vessel. I enjoy the learning and project as much as being on the lake. Ask me to be CEO of a Fortune 500 co. For a week and I think I might bankrupt it.


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roadster02
05-22-2014, 09:40 PM
Did not intend to. Sorry if you percieved it as such.

just my opinion, talk about coming across as a a$#! no I am not a mechanic but have learned how to service most of the maintenance issues with all my boats I have owned.

I am sure there might be a things you don't know that I could assist you with without coming across as a ? oh well you know!:rolleyes:

73blue
05-22-2014, 09:54 PM
You're kidding right? That's your answer? Sarcastic baloney? Ok, I'll play. Let's change the propeller on your Buick.

Im just saying, at one point we were all rookies. Did you understand the ins-and-outs of the internal combustion engine before you ever drove (or rode in, ie used) a car?

I've dealt with both kinds, and I must say I'd much rather deal with someone who knows he doesnt know anything than someone who thinks he knows everything.

And as far as your example, if a boat has been used <10 hours in a given year, it wouldnt surprise me to find bad gas, a carb gunked up by the ethanol, a dry-rotted impeller, etc. How would the PO have felt if the dealer overlooked something and his engine had overheated?

I'm really not trying to be argumentative, but your OP hit me as a little over-the-top

maxpower220
05-22-2014, 09:56 PM
I used to know a lot about working on cars, boats, and bikes.

Now, I buy newer, reliable vehicles and sell them before any of that nasty "work" is ever involved. If it breaks down, I have insurance, towing, etc.

The next owner can "learn" to work on stuff.

Table Rocker
05-22-2014, 09:57 PM
Left brain, right brain, all that stuff?

Here you go, this will help you understand everything:
http://www.amazon.com/Zen-Art-Motorcycle-Maintenance-Inquiry/dp/0060589469

ttu
05-22-2014, 09:59 PM
Did not intend to. Sorry if you percieved it as such.

no problem!:D when I read your first thread post I thought you were going with drivers who do power turns pulling tubers!!:rolleyes:

there are many on here who need advise and have learned so much from the other guys here!:D:D

scott023
05-22-2014, 10:04 PM
no problem!:D when I read your first thread post I thought you were going with drivers who do power turns pulling tubers!!:rolleyes:

there are many on here who need advise and have learned so much from the other guys here!:D:D

You can certainly put me in that category. Didn't know much of anything when we bought the 45, but the knowledge gained on here had been invaluable.

I did know enough to not be stranded though. :D

atthelake
05-22-2014, 10:06 PM
Man, I wish I was a man. Even just to be good wife would be awesome!!!!

scott023
05-22-2014, 10:07 PM
Man, I wish I was a man. Even just to be good wife would be awesome!!!!

Literally spit my water out. Lmbo

Table Rocker
05-22-2014, 10:16 PM
Some people are better off not even trying. I have a friend who can cross-thread a pickle jar. Anything he tries to fix is done for. He once sat a car battery in the front seat of his wife's car (that left a mark). Good guy though.

AlbertaSurfer
05-22-2014, 10:19 PM
Man, I wish I was a man. Even just to be good wife would be awesome!!!!

I was a good wife once. Wasn't for me, there was half burnt cookies all over the house. I went back to being a manboy who pays a 17 year old kid at Mr Lube to change the oil in my truck simply to avoid the pain of used oil disposal.

I get what the OP is sayin, and he was obviously rattled by a specific occurrence, but assuming every boat owner can trouble shoot his own boat is the same as assuming every MasterCraft will never tow a tube...

roadster02
05-22-2014, 10:19 PM
Ok, I get your point, yeah I was a rookie when I was 10 or 11, then I started working on the lawn mower I used, so yes I was somewhat knowlegable on engines before driving a car. And you are right about the gas, impeller and a few other things, that could be a problem from one year to the next, but Spark plugs, and an oil change at an hour of useage, that's just sheer rape by the dealer perpetrated on an owner that has no clue of the workings of his boat. It would be much better if the owner understood just the rudimentary maintenance so he would not be taken in such a manner. That's one of my points. In rereading my first post I can see where you might think I was over the top, I did not intend it that way, I simply just cannot believe some of the vehicle owners that are completely clueless.

Im just saying, at one point we were all ies. Did you understand the ins-and-outs of the internal combustion engine before you ever drove (or rode in, ie used) a car?

I've dealt with both kinds, and I must say I'd much rather deal with someone who knows he doesnt know anything than someone who thinks he knows everything.

And as far as your example, if a boat has been used <10 hours in a given year, it wouldnt surprise me to find bad gas, a carb gunked up by the ethanol, a dry-rotted impeller, etc. How would the PO have felt if the dealer overlooked something and his engine had overheated?

I'm really not trying to be argumentative, but your OP hit me as a little over-the-top

bgeorge01
05-22-2014, 10:20 PM
I've dealt with both kinds, and I must say I'd much rather deal with someone who knows he doesnt know anything than someone who thinks he knows everything.


Amen to that^^^! I don't know everything and love to learn what I don't know, it's nice to have people that know more, like to teach, and can answer your questions without thinking you're an idiot because you don't know... just saying.


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73blue
05-22-2014, 10:29 PM
. It would be much better if the owner understood just the rudimentary maintenance so he would not be taken in such a manner. That's one of my points.

Completely agree with this. And I definitely appreciate those that have helped me better understand this stuff.

1redTA
05-22-2014, 10:39 PM
some people may not have the time to focus on maintenance and will let others do the required maintenance so that they can enjoy the boat

wheelerd
05-22-2014, 10:41 PM
I
I've dealt with both kinds, and I must say I'd much rather deal with someone who knows he doesnt know anything than someone who thinks he knows everything.

Good words from someone famous (don't remember who.)

He who knows not that he knows not is a fool -- ignore him.
He who knows not that he knows is asleep -- wake him up.
He who knows that he knows not is a seeker -- teach him.
He who knows that he knows is wise -- follow him.

Sydney Skier
05-22-2014, 10:46 PM
I d like to way in on the subject. Im no mechanic, but im very mechanically minded ( that's my electrician side coming out in me). I can rebuild an SBC no problems pulled all my go kart motors apart for a rebuild, and Ive also rebuild my first outboard engine recently and no it wasn't my big Yamaha. yet I took my Yamaha down to a marine mechanic as I was having a small steering issue and as soon as he saw it was a Yamaha, he backed away stating he didn't know how they steering worked! ITS THE SAME AS YOUR MERCURY YOU STOOGE!!!!!!! 2 blokes on the boat ramp not to long ago. 115 Johnson on a fishing boat. Boat wouldnt start. for 20 minutes they tried starting it. they flooded it. I took a quick look and found the isolation switch in the off position I asked if the boat had an isolation switch ( knowing full well it had one) and I was rudely told to "go away and use your own boat". I left them for another half hour to teach them a lesson. After I had heard the battery had gone flat and they cursing that was going on I thought I might try again. I walked back over and asked the same question and got a very different response. I told them for $100 I would fix the problem and have them on the water in no time at all. Went and got my jumper leads and spare battery. they gave me the $100 I turned on the isolator started the boat and walked away with a huge smile on my face. Its morons like these that give people a bad name. What they did on the water was a totally different story. Easiest hundred bucks Ive ever made

Jayhawk
05-22-2014, 10:58 PM
Hmmmm...interesting post. I am one of those males and I've never considered myself a "pusses". I take my cars and my boat to the dealer and let the pros do what they are good at and what they are paid to do. It keeps the economy humming. Something breaks in the house, I call the repairman or buy a new one. I am so bad, I had to ask a fellow TTer to remove the fenders on my trailer for fear of screwing something up. My brother is a mechanic and can take apart an engine and put it back together blindfolded. To me, it looks like a bunch of metal stuff...different genes. I am safety conscious and know enough not to put myself or my family in harms way, but I am not a guy you'd want working on your stuff.

That said, I am raising three beautiful children and managing a large computer software development team. I answer hundreds of difficult questions a day, can write computer code in dozens of languages and can do complex calculus in my head. Dummy? I don't think so...just different genes and everyone should find what they're good at and do that.

I love boating with my family (in a boat I don't know much about), taking long road trips across the country (in a Sequoia I don't have a clue about and thank God for GPS!), and living in a wonderful home that someone else knew how to build. Don't call people names just because we're different than you. We get by just fine, thank you.

scott023
05-22-2014, 11:02 PM
Hmmmm...interesting post. I am one of those males and I've never considered myself a "pusses". I take my cars and my boat to the dealer and let the pros do what they are good at and what they are paid to do. It keeps the economy humming. Something breaks in the house, I call the repairman or buy a new one. I am so bad, I had to ask a fellow TTer to remove the fenders on my trailer for fear of screwing something up. My brother is a mechanic and can take apart an engine and put it back together blindfolded. To me, it looks like a bunch of metal stuff...different genes. I am safety conscious and know enough not to put myself or my family in harms way, but I am not a guy you'd want working on your stuff.

That said, I am raising three beautiful children and managing a large computer software development team. I answer hundreds of difficult questions a day, can write computer code in dozens of languages and can do complex calculus in my head. Dummy? I don't think so...just different genes and everyone should find what they're good at and do that.

I love boating with my family (in a boat I don't know much about), taking long road trips across the country (in a Sequoia I don't have a clue about and thank God for GPS!), and living in a wonderful home that someone else knew how to build. Don't call people names just because we're different than you. We get by just fine, thank you.

Very well written post. I'm in the same proverbial boat as you, for the most part. I've got things I leave to others, just like there are many that leave things for me to do for them. Win win, as far as I'm concerned.

lashburn1
05-23-2014, 01:56 AM
You are right ! My wife and I looked under the hood of our RV for 20min tonight looking for the Battery to Jump Star our ATV. I did have jumper cables.
Felt stupid.
I will learn more.

Blmeanie
05-23-2014, 06:55 AM
Hmmmm...interesting post. I am one of those males and I've never considered myself a "pusses". I take my cars and my boat to the dealer and let the pros do what they are good at and what they are paid to do. It keeps the economy humming. Something breaks in the house, I call the repairman or buy a new one. I am so bad, I had to ask a fellow TTer to remove the fenders on my trailer for fear of screwing something up. My brother is a mechanic and can take apart an engine and put it back together blindfolded. To me, it looks like a bunch of metal stuff...different genes. I am safety conscious and know enough not to put myself or my family in harms way, but I am not a guy you'd want working on your stuff.

That said, I am raising three beautiful children and managing a large computer software development team. I answer hundreds of difficult questions a day, can write computer code in dozens of languages and can do complex calculus in my head. Dummy? I don't think so...just different genes and everyone should find what they're good at and do that.

I love boating with my family (in a boat I don't know much about), taking long road trips across the country (in a Sequoia I don't have a clue about and thank God for GPS!), and living in a wonderful home that someone else knew how to build. Don't call people names just because we're different than you. We get by just fine, thank you.

Well said, described me too. I boat with my neighbor at the lake, he is a mechanic by trade. We have an arrangement of sorts, I provide the hydrofoil and nice boat and when things need fixing he jumps in. Sometimes he tries to teach me things but even he knows it isn't where my brain is.

roadster02
05-23-2014, 08:09 AM
I get where you are coming from, but I don't know how you guys do it. I would just feel totally helpless and at the mercy of the fates. Standing next to my vehicle on a lonely two lane scratching my head, no cell phone service, hoping for another good samaritan, or cop to come by, or floating in the middle of the huge lake doing the same head scratching, waiting, family looking to me for the solution, hoping a ranger or other boater will help, because some simple easy to fix thing happened. No thanks. Different strokes I guess.

3event
05-23-2014, 08:15 AM
Although I make a living running a sales organization stocked with engineers (myself included), I'm extremely limited in mechanical abilities where cars and boats are concerned. I rely on my dealer for servicing the boat - primarily to have the liability for this nice machine on someone else's head. Love the boat, love boating, and have picked up enough knowledge to stay out of trouble - much of it from this forum.

Further to a point made above - all is good if you know what you don't know. A wise man once said:

"A man's got to know his limitations"
-Dirty Harry Callahan

shepherd
05-23-2014, 08:41 AM
Haha. Nice rant roadster! :D

Personally, I'd like to think I have enough aptitude to fix the simple easy to fix things. But don't ask me to rebuild a carburetor out on the water (or even in my garage... :( ).

But why limit it to males? If I was a woman, it seems I'd be even more inclined to be able to fix my stuff so I'm not stranded next to my vehicle on a lonely two lane...



I get where you are coming from, but I don't know how you guys do it. I would just feel totally helpless and at the mercy of the fates. Standing next to my vehicle on a lonely two lane scratching my head, no cell phone service, hoping for another good samaritan, or cop to come by, or floating in the middle of the huge lake doing the same head scratching, waiting, family looking to me for the solution, hoping a ranger or other boater will help, because some simple easy to fix thing happened. No thanks. Different strokes I guess.

roadster02
05-23-2014, 10:22 AM
You're right, but traditionally a man is assumed to be the fixer. Most women should know the basics for the reasons mentioned, I know my spouse does, I taught her just for those kind of occasions. Everyone should know the simple fixes.

bsloop
05-23-2014, 10:33 AM
rant by the OP; agree it seems odd to someone mechanically inclined but Jayhawker has a legitimate answer.

OP is the type of guy that gets Jayhawker out of a jam on the ramp. Jayhawker is probably the type of guy that would pass you a case of beer in thanks and not worry because he planned ahead and has another in the cooler and one in the truck.

So, lets all enjoy this holiday weekend and get some good ramp entertainment from those both not capable of doing it themselves and not smart enough to let someone else do it :toast:

VP46
05-23-2014, 11:24 AM
I wonder the same thing sometimes but I am so mechanically oriented I can't relate to people who's theory on internal combustion engines is "i put gas in and it goes. When it does't it's broken." I love the trouble shooting of things. With what I have invested in my boat I could have had a much newer vessel. I enjoy the learning and project as much as being on the lake.

**Ask me to be CEO of a Fortune 500 co. For a week and I think I might bankrupt it.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Hah!! I bet you could BK a few of those Fortune 500 cos slower than some of the experts! You'd be surprised!!

To the OP point.. If you are flying an aircraft as PIC and do not understand the aircraft systems and how they operate you might just be a fool.

B

roadster02
05-23-2014, 11:31 AM
That's fair enough, I just wanted to get some other opinions. Everybody have a good weekend, with the current wet weather in some states, you might need your boat to float down to the lake. Be safe and stay out of that standing, or running water on the streets.

rant by the OP; agree it seems odd to someone mechanically inclined but Jayhawker has a legitimate answer.

OP is the type of guy that gets Jayhawker out of a jam on the ramp. Jayhawker is probably the type of guy that would pass you a case of beer in thanks and not worry because he planned ahead and has another in the cooler and one in the truck.

So, lets all enjoy this holiday weekend and get some good ramp entertainment from those both not capable of doing it themselves and not smart enough to let someone else do it :toast:

Roman
05-23-2014, 11:50 AM
I do relate that you should have a basic understanding of a vessel, for safety sake. IE, you should know how to check your oil and add it, do a general inspection of hoses and belts, know how to properly boost (so many people don't do this in the proper order though), ect.

As far as maintenance is concerned though, there are people who get paid to do that sort of thing. IF your making 50 plus bucks an hour, you can probably afford not to get dirty and let a pro do it. Mind you, to the person making 20-30 that is a different story. But from I've learned, the American way of thinking would tell you to just put it on your credit card, or trade in for something new and just finance the new reliable boat. The payments arnt that much per month.

I love toys. That my problem. And we all know toys are expensive. So in order for me to be able to afford all my toys I need to do the maintenance and repairs on them. Its helps that I'm a mechanical engineer, and work with cars/engine all the time. If I had to pay people to fix my stuff, I would only have one toy and that's not fun. Unless I was making tons of cash, then I wouldn't waste my time fixing old machinery. Id would buy new and enjoy the activity and not waste my time wrenching (fyi I say I love wrenching, but I hate it at the same time. My problem is Im a cheap bastard so that's why Im always working on my own stuff....and I don't always trust other people especially mechanics)

lentiman
05-23-2014, 12:50 PM
I was going to spout off, but Roman covered some of what I wanted to say (thanks Roman). Basic understanding should be required, yes. Many states now requires a boater license and to get this you have to pass a boater education course, which accomplishes some of what you're talking about. I work full time, have 2 boys, own my own side business, and also own/manage a rental property. So my time IS money. I take care of most of my own maintenance but sometimes it is a better VALUE for me to have the dealer do something for me that I don't have the time to do or learn. I've spent almost every night this week painting the interior of my rental until midnight. I could have paid someone to do this, but it wouldn't be a good value to me. Everyone else is not me though and I understand this.

All of that said, let's use your point of view on something more personal: you. How well do you know how your own body works? Do you know specifically what happens if you get too large a dose of carbon monoxide? Not "I'll pass out", but how the hemoglobin in your blood will preferentially bind CO vs O2 and what that process entails? Do you understand how your blood vessels dilate after chugging that beer and what your liver is doing to fight off alcohol toxicity? Why not? It's your own body, how can you not know how it works? You operate it every day! This is argument you're presenting, and it just doesn't hold up. People can't know everything about everything. That's why we have mechanics, and doctors, and every other profession. If I have a plumber put in a shower valve for me it's not because I'm stupid. It's because even though I'm sure I can figure out how to sweat copper pipe I'm not prepared to spend the hours fixing it if I do it wrong. Not everyone will see the same value in basic knowledge. Just because it interests YOU and you see the value in it doesn't mean that everyone will. So unless you built your own house, delivered all your children, grow all of your own food, make your own tools, and would perform open heart surgery on yourself tone it down a bit. You're making a good point, but carrying it WAY too far.

And for the record: I am grumpy because the weather here is supposed to be rain all Memorial Day weekend. Suck.

Roman
05-23-2014, 01:03 PM
Lentiman,

You made a good point on "Value". For a lot of people there is no value in learning to do this, which I completely understand especially if your only doing it once. I wish I was in that position, but my day job doesn't pay enough, and my rental income doesn't either.

People should know more about there bodies, which they don't. One of the main reasons people don't take care of themselves properly. Ive recently started learning more in an effort to be more heath conscious. My lady is also back in school so she's always hitting me with knowledge bombs (human biology). Either way, great example.

I have my own garden too! Its more fun and extra mandatory exercise and healthy eating.

Making your own tools? Been there done that.

Im a huge DIY guy, and my uncle always busts my balls about this. He always hits it with "I get paid XX per hour at work. Why am I going to fu(k around with this BS. I would rather go enjoy something". Which I completely understand, but I'm not at that pay scale.

For the record....Im at work...ready to leave. No boat, but ill still enjoy the weekend....repairing all my gutters hahah

lentiman
05-23-2014, 01:19 PM
For the record my reply was for roadster02, but thanks for the comments.

bobx1
05-23-2014, 01:59 PM
.....I answer hundreds of difficult questions a day, can write computer code in dozens of languages and can do complex calculus in my head....

Roadster02:

Get Jayhawk's phone number and keep it handy when you go to purchase a newer boat. All those great mechanical skills and knowledge go to crap when your new boat's COMPUTER decides to not let you start your engine (even though mechanically, everything checks out) or when the COMPUTER decides to dump your ballast for no explained reason or when the COMPUTER drops a wake plate in the middle of a run just because you changed the station on the radio. :D

P.S. Just messin with you Roadster02 as I do appreciate those with mechanical skills.

roadster02
05-23-2014, 02:07 PM
LOL Thanks for the advice. I went old school as much as possible with the 91 Prostar, no fuel injection, no sensors, and carbureted. Not much electronically to fail. I don't intend to go any newer than this one. :)

Roadster02:

Get Jayhawk's phone number and keep it handy when you go to purchase a newer boat. All those great mechanical skills and knowledge go to crap when your new boat's COMPUTER decides to not let you start your engine (even though mechanically, everything checks out) or when the COMPUTER decides to dump your ballast for no explained reason or when the COMPUTER drops a wake plate in the middle of a run just because you changed the station on the radio. :D

P.S. Just messin with you Roadster02 as I do appreciate those with mechanical skills.

roadster02
05-23-2014, 02:11 PM
Good points.
I don't drink beer.
I try very hard to take care of my own "mechanicals":rolleyes:
Sorry to hear about your weather, won't be much better in my area.:(

For the record my reply was for roadster02, but thanks for the comments.

WakeWise
05-23-2014, 02:56 PM
I live by "what other people think of me isn't my business". What I think of me is. Once you start dictating how others should be it will only get you mad plus some people will never change. Be who you are and want to be. Let others amuse you. Help others when you can.

WakeWise