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  #11  
Old 07-10-2014, 02:56 PM
TruckeeEP TruckeeEP is online now
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Oh yeah, if you have second story space that isn't engineered and designed to be second story space, do yourself a favor and have it finished and permitted. It is a royal PITA to do this after the fact....

Sounds like you saved yourself a lot of heartache and extra expenses in discovering that your plan had second story space, but wasn't designed for it....

Ok, hopefully I am understanding your situation somewhat correct.

As I said, we probably don't have enough information to give solid advice.
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  #12  
Old 07-10-2014, 03:29 PM
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As a Commercial GC that price is high. Did you get a breakdown of costs? If you were to add pre-manufactured floor trusses the cost should only be $3500 to $4000 for that sf. I am also surprised that even with an unfinished 2nd floor that the house would not be designed to accept a finished 2nd floor. The cost difference is minimal to make that happen up front. More info would help everyone out with the $$$. Example: Are the ceiling joist already in place. Is this a remodel of existing or new construction.
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  #13  
Old 07-10-2014, 03:44 PM
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Isn't the purpose of having a second floor "unfinished" intented to be finished later in the future? So wouldn't it already be framed as such?

Same as unfinished basement....ready for future finishing once it was needed.
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  #14  
Old 07-10-2014, 05:12 PM
maxpower220 maxpower220 is offline
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I am building right now. Of course material costs won't be $18K, but engineering a plan change will be $2k by itself (worst case). Materials for the support a couple of grand. Then the added electrical, HVAC, stairs, plumbing; it all adds up quickly. Plus, don't forget the added cost that the GC is adding for a plan change.

It will be much cheaper to do now rather than later.
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  #15  
Old 07-10-2014, 07:11 PM
snork snork is offline
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maxpower has a point if you include everything from structure all the way to mechanicals and finishout $18k isn't too far off, especially if it wasn't designed for living space
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  #16  
Old 07-10-2014, 09:04 PM
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That 18k was just lumber. No HVAC, electric, plumbing, drywall, or insulation. I have the blueprints if anyone is interested.
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  #17  
Old 07-10-2014, 10:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by u bet shes wet View Post
As a Commercial GC that price is high. Did you get a breakdown of costs? If you were to add pre-manufactured floor trusses the cost should only be $3500 to $4000 for that sf. I am also surprised that even with an unfinished 2nd floor that the house would not be designed to accept a finished 2nd floor. The cost difference is minimal to make that happen up front. More info would help everyone out with the $$$. Example: Are the ceiling joist already in place. Is this a remodel of existing or new construction.
The plans label the second floor as storage and future area. It shows where the knee walls will be due to the roof pitch and all that. I don't see how an engineer would need to do a redesign aside from changing the ceiling joists to floor joists. I have been told that the price difference per foot for ceiling and floor joists is .90 and 2.00. With that calculated, I figure $1900 would have been the original cost for ceiling joists, so floor joists put me at $4200. Labor should be no different. Then about $2000 for subfloor. Far cry from $18,000. This is new construction. When I asked what it would be to just do a basement instead of the crawlspace (sloping land), he said at least $115k extra Something is not right here.
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  #18  
Old 07-11-2014, 07:03 AM
chrislandy chrislandy is offline
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I think your builder is taking the pee a little (or quite a lot!) at least with the upper story section

Basements are ALWAYS expensive, there's tanking, unknown ground conditions, reinforcement if its RC wall and slab, more expensive blocks if going hollowblock retaining wall etc etc in the UK a new build basement would be in the 60k+ bracket to convert from standard foundation to basement so to me $115k sounds normal.

The attic conversion to habitable space sounds like he's trying to pull a fast one or make up some loss on a different part of the job. Obviously I haven't seen the plans so cannot comment on exact sizes etc but when you design an attic for "storage" (in the UK) it has an imposed load of 0.25kN/m2 and minimal finishes to the top so normally it's just binders and some 1/2in OSB on top of the joists. You go up to habitable then the dead load increases significantly as the boards are typically 3/4in, added insulation and other finishes then the imposed load increases to 1.5kN/m2 (again in the UK)

The type of roof construction should not change therefore if you wanted to just redesign the ceiling joists to take the habitable loading then it's simply a matter of the joists getting bigger - this assumes the internal walls are load bearing and have the capacity to take the additional load.

There should not be any fee loading for the change in structure other than the specific increase in material cost for the joists unless steel beams or glulams are required or internal walls need re-designing etc. *If* it's a case of the joist increases from 4" to 8" (or 12" etc) then the cost increase should literally be the base material cost. - especially at this point of the build when you haven't even put a shovel in the ground yet!

edit: forgot to mention I am a structural engineer! lol
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  #19  
Old 07-11-2014, 08:59 AM
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Can anyone else speak for basement construction? I'm talking just excavating, going from 36" crawlspace to basement height walls, staircase, and slab for about 2200 sqft. There are 14 footers within the 2200 sqft that are single block footers. I'd imagine I would probably be looking at going to posts instead.
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  #20  
Old 07-11-2014, 09:13 AM
snork snork is offline
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If you're not committed to this builder I'd interview and get an estimate on a couple more
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