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Old 09-07-2015, 04:50 PM
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Help with Small Scratch Repair

End of last season I got caught in a big storm on our houseboat and the back tie down got a bit or work out and I was left with some small scratches. I have never tried to repair something like this so it's time to learn. Because they are not deep, is this something you can wet sand....

Looking for advice please......
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Old 09-07-2015, 06:37 PM
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Old 09-07-2015, 08:05 PM
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Meguiars 105 might take that out, they look really light to me compared to "damage"
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Old 09-07-2015, 08:07 PM
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I have a scratch like that on the 25. It won't come out with a heavy duty compound on a wool pad. So wetsanding is probably necessary.
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Old 09-07-2015, 09:10 PM
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I've had a few marks that I thought would be impossible to shift but they have come out better than I would have hoped. Mine is black, not flake. A quality swirl remover and random orbital buffer can do wonders. Just looking a the pics I reckon it would do the trick. I'd agree with Cloaked about trying that first although I'd probably go a less aggressive pad than lambs wool to start. Definitely be patient though, as Cloaked said and donut' be scared to come back to it a second time. Work on one mark at a time, that way you can see that it is working.

If it doesn't work, you can still go the more aggressive approach.

If you can show the marks to a local body shop supplier, they should be able to get you sorted.
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Old 09-07-2015, 11:12 PM
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Cheers

Thanks for the help guys.....
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Old 09-08-2015, 09:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloaked View Post
Tony,
Most of those marks look like they will buff out with 3M Super Duty compound and a lamb's wool pad (if I am seeing the picture correctly). Start there (the least aggressive touch) and see how much will clean up. If not, you can wet sand; I'd start with a 2000 grit and work back until you get the marks gone, then come back with the 3M and wool pad to take out any residue marks from sanding. Then cover that with a finishing glaze compound, then a coat of wax. I recommend a decent tool for the job with the wool pad. A random orbital, variable-speed buffing tool such as this ==> http://www.amazon.com/PORTER-CABLE-7...eywords=buffer <== or similar. Slow is the ticket, as tempting as it is to run higher RPMs while buffing. Let the 3M cutting compound do its job at a slow speed.

If you resort to wet sanding, use a sanding block with the paper.

Before I got real aggressive (say an 800 or less grit), I'd consider chalking it up to good times and character and let it be. Or not.
^ This is great advice. Hard to tell but I suspect you'll have to wet sand to get that one out. You want to use the block as it helps put the sanding pressure where you want it. When you sand keep in mind you'll need to spend about twice the amount of time on each smaller grit paper.

First time I took sand paper to my boat I was very scared I was never going to get the scratches out. It will still look a little scary after the 3M compound. I followed up with 3M Marine Finesse IT II polish and the remaining scratches disappeared. It's pretty amazing to see for the first time.

One other thing it took me a while to figure out. When using the compound it will turn to powder and it's job is done in just a couple of seconds. Use small amounts and repeat using a microfiber cloth to keep things clean in between. The polish takes a bit longer and you can do a bigger area at a time.
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