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  #11  
Old 02-01-2014, 01:27 PM
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I've thought about the outdoor ones as well but the start up cost is holding me back, that and I don't really have a good spot for one. It'd basically be sitting in my yard with nothing around it or any way to hide it. Obviously hindsight is 20/20, had I been thinking I would have had a something put in to reduce my dependence on propane when we built as well however from my research at the time I wasn't concerned enough to do so. We have a regular wood burning fireplace in our family room that we get some heat from, but unless you're in that room you don't really notice it.
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  #12  
Old 02-01-2014, 01:43 PM
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clrussell clrussell is offline
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We found our hardy furnace used, it's probably 10 years old and looks brand new. Have $1500 in it. It's one large enough to run 2 heating coils off of and will heat my shop also when I get around to building it. A new one like it was 6,000 plus.
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  #13  
Old 02-01-2014, 04:34 PM
PS195 PS195 is offline
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Furnace

My neighbors just installed a napoleon propane wood combo furnace in September
House is just over 2000 sqft, winter so far one of coldest in long time
Wood box will take 4/5 large pieces and lasts a good number of hours once you get your dampers setup keeps house very cozy with that heat only wood can provide
He is only using propane when he,so not home to stoke the fire
Great solution if you have free or even just cheap wood supply
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  #14  
Old 02-01-2014, 05:57 PM
uplander uplander is offline
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A basic wood burner placed in your living space will do plenty, I heated my old house with wood. I had electric heat and I hated the fact if it ever turned on. If you keep the fire going and have a good heavy duty wood burner it will do the trick. Placement is key, if you can have it located where you are most of the time in the house is a huge factor.
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Old 02-03-2014, 09:49 AM
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I've had a Hardy Heater for about 8 years now and have nothing but good things to say about them. No issues to date and it provides good (warm) heat and limitless hot water. I bought the second size up because I wanted to put it under the shed roof at the barn, which is about 100 feet from the house. As it turns out, I didn't need the larger size, but I can always add heat to the barn if I want to.

You have to have good access to free wood and not hate the chore of cutting wood. It uses a fair amount of wood but I don't mind the task. In 8 years it has paid for multiple times with my propane savings. I highly suggest the hardy heater; heck my dad even bought one when he was 74!
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  #16  
Old 02-03-2014, 09:57 AM
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An advantage of the outdoor wood heater "Hardy" is that it is on a thermostat just like the house is. The heater itself, keeps the water at a consistent temp. When the water is hot, the heater is not burning the wood; when the water cools down, a dampner opens and a fan forces air into the wood chamber to get the fire going.

There is a seperate thermostat installed in my home that controls the combination of the Hardy along with the blower on my central furnace.
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  #17  
Old 02-03-2014, 10:34 AM
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years ago, we had an undersized electric heatpump & masonery fireplace but when very cold for this area (below freezing several days in a row) we could only maintain inside temperature of about 55. We had a very hard cold spell that lasted several weeks when our son was first born, and we placed electric space heaters in the bedroom to keep it bearable. We bought a fireplace insert, largest that would fit and started heating with wood. We could heat the majority of our 2300 sq ft home with the insert. Our master bedroom was at the fartherest end of the house and it got pretty chilly unless the electric HVAC would kick on and circulate the heat from the fireplace. In our current home, we installed a built in high efficiency circulating fireplace insert with blowers that really helps maintain the main level (~2600 sq ft).

The problem I run into now days is I don't have that endless supply of wood without purchasing pre-cut from area vendors (~$180-240/cord) ... unlike years ago, when I had unlimited access.
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  #18  
Old 02-03-2014, 01:00 PM
mastercraft1995 mastercraft1995 is offline
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We heat our house with a free standing wood stove. Our electric bill is about $80 in the winter and $90 in the summer when we run the Air. Our whole house is Electric.

To me wood if it's free it's a no brainer. Do yourself a favor and don't cheap out on a stove. My buddy did just that and now he is looking at getting a new one. Get one that you can put in big pieces in.

Get a good saw. I have a Stihl MS 360 with a 25 inch bar that rips the wood. If I purchased a new one I would get a Stihl 440/441 or 460 with a 28 inch bar.
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  #19  
Old 02-03-2014, 08:13 PM
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skps190 skps190 is offline
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Lots of good ideas and recommendations, I'm still not 100% sure which way I'm going to go. The more I look into the Hardy Heaters or Timberwolf Furnaces the more interested I'm getting. I'd have to figure out logistics of where I can put it to keep it close to where my wood is stacked.

I think I like an indoor unit only so I don't have to go out morning and night to maintain it. My main issue now with an indoor unit is where/how to vent it. My furnace and chimney are not located near each other if I go with a basement location (my #1 choice), someone I talked to brought up a pellet stove as well because those can be vented right out a side wall and don't have to be above the roof line. The downside is it can't/shouldn't be hooked up to a forced air system.

As you can tell I don't want to make an expensive mistake, yet I don't want to wait real long to make a decision. Every day I wait is more propane I'm burning.
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  #20  
Old 02-03-2014, 09:45 PM
uplander uplander is offline
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I would not worry about furnace location, find a good spot inside your house and go straight up. The only major thing you need to check on is your insurance provider, they normally do not like them. Which might make the outside unit a better choice.
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