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  #11  
Old 12-31-2013, 01:20 PM
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Originally Posted by jstewart319 View Post
Iíve dry aged Prime Rib a few times. The first time I did it I was scared is was ruining an expensive piece of meat, but after how well it turned out Iíve done it a few times now.

I pat the meat dry and then wrap it with cheese cloth and place it on a cookie sheet with a raised grate. I donít season the meat either. After 24 hours I remove the cheese cloth and rewrap it with some fresh cheese cloth and put it back in the fridge for 10 days. The frig is one that I donít use often so the temp stays consent and cool. When ready to cook I remove the cheese cloth and cut off any dried or crusty meat or fat, season to my liking and cook it. The meat is so tender no knife is required.
That sounds similar to the method Alton Brown taught on his show, though I think he only dried it for 3 or 4 days.
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  #12  
Old 01-01-2014, 03:45 PM
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Originally Posted by shepherd View Post
Reminded me of this article I came across several months ago: http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/01/t...f-at-home.html

I'm not saying it's true and accurate just because it's on the internet. Who knows, maybe this was secretly put out there by some steakhouse chain who wants to discourage home-aging. But after reading this, my conclusion was that it's probably not worth the trouble.

Make up your own mind. If you try it, I hope you prove me wrong... and let us know so we can try it too!
Nice article.

I think the biggest hurdle will be the humidity. It seems most commercial aging rooms run around 65% and I've read that most refrigerators run at 85%+. How much that will affect the process is anyone's guess.

I've only had dry aged meat once and the more I read about it I don't think it was truly dry aged. It was at a steak house in Vegas and I ordered a filet which seems to be one of the only meats that doesn't benefit from aging like other meats. I read where dry aging beef tenderloin is only done for a few days and not months. So the results of aging a filet would not be the same as say a large bone in rib eye.

I do intend to give it try so I'll let you know how it turns out.
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  #13  
Old 01-02-2014, 09:00 AM
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BrianM BrianM is offline
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Buddy of mine does it all the time. Uses his second refridgerator that doesn't get opened much. He does whole rib eyes, and prime ribs. Turns out absolutely amazing. If I had a spare fridge I'd do it all the time.
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  #14  
Old 01-06-2014, 03:48 PM
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lukedeuce lukedeuce is offline
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CantRepeat, what type of meat will you be dry aging? I've done a couple commercial drying/aging chambers and may be able to help
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Old 01-06-2014, 10:19 PM
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Thanks Lukedeuce.

At this point I'm trying to figure out how to convert a frig to dry age beef. Everything I've read leads me to believe that rib eyes are the standard. That is dry aging tbones, porter house or tenderloin isn't the way to go. NY strips are a good choice too.

I know I need air flow and humidity around 65% and then some salts. I know in large commercial frigs they use a rock salt wall but in smaller places a tray of salt is used.

I'm rookie at this point so figured there might be some folks that have done it at home and had ideas to share. I'm pretty close to doing this now. I have a source for 120v 80mm fans for the frig but am always open to ideas.
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Old 01-07-2014, 11:40 AM
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I've done dry aging, following Alton Brown's method. Turned out very, very well. I also used the cooking method in the above link- my wife says it's the best steak she's ever had.

I have no comment on involving salts and whatnot to help dry the meat. I've only done it with the paper towels, and it works very well. I've done rib eyes and sirloins, the rib eyes definitely have more flavor to them, and they literally do fall apart in your mouth. Good stuff!
G
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Old 01-07-2014, 01:05 PM
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Most residential fridges will run about 40% humidity. If you have an outside thermometer that reads humidity, I would stick it in the fridge and watch over a few days (while empty). You will notice that it will be higher the first day then steadily drop as the air that passes over the coils is condensed and routed to the drop pan outside the box. Keeping the air moving with small CPU fans is a good place to start. Pans of water will help humidity as well. A short burst of steam, say from a pot of boiling water, will introduce the humidity much quicker.

Trial and error is the best education on small scale. But, with as much research you have done thus far is only going to help!

Don't forget you can also do hard salamis, prosciutto, copa and pancetta all relatively easily too.
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  #18  
Old 01-07-2014, 03:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gweaver View Post
I've done dry aging, following Alton Brown's method. Turned out very, very well. I also used the cooking method in the above link- my wife says it's the best steak she's ever had.

I have no comment on involving salts and whatnot to help dry the meat. I've only done it with the paper towels, and it works very well. I've done rib eyes and sirloins, the rib eyes definitely have more flavor to them, and they literally do fall apart in your mouth. Good stuff!
G

I'm looking at doing the entire sub primal cut of ribs, bone in. Rather then individual steaks.
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  #19  
Old 01-07-2014, 03:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lukedeuce View Post
Most residential fridges will run about 40% humidity. If you have an outside thermometer that reads humidity, I would stick it in the fridge and watch over a few days (while empty). You will notice that it will be higher the first day then steadily drop as the air that passes over the coils is condensed and routed to the drop pan outside the box. Keeping the air moving with small CPU fans is a good place to start. Pans of water will help humidity as well. A short burst of steam, say from a pot of boiling water, will introduce the humidity much quicker.

Trial and error is the best education on small scale. But, with as much research you have done thus far is only going to help!

Don't forget you can also do hard salamis, prosciutto, copa and pancetta all relatively easily too.
That's a good idea about the humidity indicator. They are rather cheap at the hardware store.
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  #20  
Old 01-15-2014, 01:41 PM
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Here's a nice little article about dry aging a couple of different cuts and then grinding your own burgers.

http://blog.golbsalt.com/2012/05/14/...he-difference/
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