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Old 01-27-2015, 09:13 PM
Weathers5 Weathers5 is offline
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1980 ss first start up advice

All,

I recently purchased a 1980 MC SS that seems to be in good condition. The boat has been sitting on a lift in a boat house for ~5 yrs. I'm picking the boat up on Sunday, and I'd like some advice on steps I need to take before attempting to start the boat. The previous owner is a family friend who said that before the last winterization, the boat was running like a top. This is my 4th MC, so Im not completely inexperienced. However, Im no mechanic either, and this is my first restoration attempt. Any help is greatly appreciated.
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  #2  
Old 01-27-2015, 09:27 PM
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Rossterman Rossterman is online now
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Pull plugs and spray some wd-40 in the cylinders to get some lubrication. Slow turn over to make sure it spins free. Also oil and gas change is good precaution.

Last edited by Rossterman; 01-28-2015 at 06:50 AM.
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  #3  
Old 01-27-2015, 09:38 PM
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Jerseydave Jerseydave is offline
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Some engine builders would say remove the distributor and using an old shaft from one and a drill spin the oil pump first to pressurize the oil system. (with fresh oil of course)
5 years is a long time......would I do that? Probably not but as stated above definitely spray a lot of oil into each spark plug hole. Leave plugs out, remove the coil wire and spin the engine over a few times so the oil gets all around those pistons and cylinders. Reinstall plugs coil wire and fire it up. LET IT IDLE for a while before any revving. Let that oil soak the valve train and camshaft before you rev it up. (idle 5-10 minutes if possible)
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Old 01-27-2015, 09:47 PM
Weathers5 Weathers5 is offline
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What about the tranny fluid?
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Old 01-27-2015, 10:21 PM
paintpollz paintpollz is offline
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Originally Posted by Weathers5 View Post
What about the tranny fluid?
Change it. Changing the tranny fluid is just as easy, if not easier than changing the motor oil/filter. I bought a $12 suction pump from autozone to suck the old tranny fluid out, and that worked perfectly. It took me all of 4 minutes to change the tranny fluid. The oil took me 2 hours (slow slowwww drip of coffee black oil). I will change both in the beginning of every season.

Just as others have said, change the oil/filter, pull each plug and spray the cylinder walls with fogging spray before you start it. Of course hook your fake-a-lake system up, bring the boat up to temp, and then change the tranny fluid when its warm.

If you go to start it and it's running rough after a few minutes, or climbing too high in temperature, I would just shut it down. You would then have a whole other series of things to work thru like fuel delivery and ignition before you will get it running nicely (assuming compression is OK). Of course you will have to sort out cooling issues if it is climbing too high in temp, but the cooling systems are simple stupid on these boats and they usually are not difficult to diagnose & fix.

All said, don't be nervous, fire that bad boy up and let us know how it goes! Take a vid and post it! Don't forget to grab a new impeller from Ski Dim before you go out for the season. Good luck and welcome to the forum.
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Old 01-27-2015, 10:25 PM
Weathers5 Weathers5 is offline
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Thanks for all the advice. Ill document as much as possible. My brother and I are really pumped about this restoration since it's our first.
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  #7  
Old 01-27-2015, 10:55 PM
paintpollz paintpollz is offline
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Originally Posted by Weathers5 View Post
Thanks for all the advice. Ill document as much as possible. My brother and I are really pumped about this restoration since it's our first.
Good, and I enjoy reading through a well documented resto, as do several others on this board. Start a new thread in the Restoration section of the board and document your steps, you will be happy you did in the long run. Begin with the first start videos, and end with the finished product. Looking forward to seeing your progress. Most importantly, have fun.
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Old 01-27-2015, 11:24 PM
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thatsmrmastercraft thatsmrmastercraft is online now
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I would go one step farther on oiling the cylinder walls. They will be completely dry, as will the rings. There will likely be some amount of rust on these parts. I would get about two ounces of oil in each cylinder and let it sit for a day, then put a large socket wrench on the crankshaft bolt and turn the engine over by hand until you are tired, then have your brother turn it for a while. When you have accomplished this, and have everything else ready to go, crank the engine over a few times with the coil wire removed distributor cap and grounded. This isn't a process you want to rush through. You run the risk of doing some real damage to the cylinder walls if you shortcut this process. I would change the oil before this process, and again after a couple runs.

Remove the fuel tank and discard the bad fuel. At a minimum you should flush the tank. Better to get it steam cleaned. Replace the rubber fuel line from the tank to the fuel pump with ethanol resistant fuel line. If it has a fuel/water separator, change the filter.

The carb should really be rebuilt. Rubber parts and gaskets will have shrunk from exposure to fuel. If you don't decide to rebuild it, remove the carb and replace the base gasket and spacer gasket. While it is off, replace the accelerator pump gasket. Be sure you get one with a green color to it - these are ethanol resistant. You can pick these up at a local parts store as they are non marine specific. Turn the carb upside down and tighten the 8 large philips head screws.....they will be loose from gasket shrinkage. Of course, change the fuel filter.

Change the trans fluid prior to running, and again after the first outing.
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  #9  
Old 01-28-2015, 06:34 AM
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whiskeyriver whiskeyriver is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thatsmrmastercraft View Post
I would go one step farther on oiling the cylinder walls. They will be completely dry, as will the rings. There will likely be some amount of rust on these parts. I would get about two ounces of oil in each cylinder and let it sit for a day, then put a large socket wrench on the crankshaft bolt and turn the engine over by hand until you are tired, then have your brother turn it for a while. When you have accomplished this, and have everything else ready to go, crank the engine over a few times with the coil wire removed distributor cap and grounded. This isn't a process you want to rush through. You run the risk of doing some real damage to the cylinder walls if you shortcut this process. I would change the oil before this process, and again after a couple runs.



Change the trans fluid prior to running, and again after the first outing.
This, definitely. Although it may seem like a lot to do, this is a great procedure to prevent broken rings or bent valves should any of them have become stuck. The socket and ratchet are much more forgiving than the starter motor.
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Old 01-28-2015, 08:24 AM
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paco_06 paco_06 is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thatsmrmastercraft View Post
I would go one step farther on oiling the cylinder walls. They will be completely dry, as will the rings. There will likely be some amount of rust on these parts. I would get about two ounces of oil in each cylinder and let it sit for a day, then put a large socket wrench on the crankshaft bolt and turn the engine over by hand until you are tired, then have your brother turn it for a while. When you have accomplished this, and have everything else ready to go, crank the engine over a few times with the coil wire removed distributor cap and grounded. This isn't a process you want to rush through. You run the risk of doing some real damage to the cylinder walls if you shortcut this process. I would change the oil before this process, and again after a couple runs.

Remove the fuel tank and discard the bad fuel. At a minimum you should flush the tank. Better to get it steam cleaned. Replace the rubber fuel line from the tank to the fuel pump with ethanol resistant fuel line. If it has a fuel/water separator, change the filter.

The carb should really be rebuilt. Rubber parts and gaskets will have shrunk from exposure to fuel. If you don't decide to rebuild it, remove the carb and replace the base gasket and spacer gasket. While it is off, replace the accelerator pump gasket. Be sure you get one with a green color to it - these are ethanol resistant. You can pick these up at a local parts store as they are non marine specific. Turn the carb upside down and tighten the 8 large philips head screws.....they will be loose from gasket shrinkage. Of course, change the fuel filter.

Change the trans fluid prior to running, and again after the first outing.
X2 ....a lot more work. But it will be worth it. If you are planning on restoring, this won't be a drop in the bucket compared to what you're about to get into. Besides, this will potentially save you a thousand or two
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