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Old 11-07-2013, 12:08 AM
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imyourmaster imyourmaster is offline
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Is Fusing on the Negative/Ground side Necessary?

Is it necessary to install a fuse between the amplifier and battery on the negative/ground wire?
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Old 11-07-2013, 09:32 AM
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Nope. Just on the positive side.
If every amplifier has a sophisticated internal protection circuit you don't necessarily have to fuse each amplifier individually. But, in any case, you must have a master fuse or breaker at minimum of the appropriate size in very close proximity to the supply source. The primary function of this master fuse or breaker is to protect the boat and occupants in the event of a boating accident.
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Old 11-07-2013, 12:35 PM
skitilldark skitilldark is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imyourmaster View Post
Is it necessary to install a fuse between the amplifier and battery on the negative/ground wire?
I installed more of a circuit breaker type switch(on positive side) just in case I took in a lot of water in the boat so I could kill the power simultaneously to all four amps. It comes in handy when you have an inexperienced driver...
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Old 11-07-2013, 04:31 PM
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Originally Posted by David Analog View Post
Nope. Just on the positive side.
If every amplifier has a sophisticated internal protection circuit you don't necessarily have to fuse each amplifier individually. But, in any case, you must have a master fuse or breaker at minimum of the appropriate size in very close proximity to the supply source. The primary function of this master fuse or breaker is to protect the boat and occupants in the event of a boating accident.
David, thanks for the clarification. I am installing a 200A resettable circuit breaker on a 1/0 awg power wire between the battery and the distribution block. The distribution block will feed two amplifiers (SD6 and MHD 600/4) by means of a 4 awg wire to each amplifier.

Is in necessary to add a smaller fuse on the 4 awg wire between the distribution block and each of the amplifiers?

Thanks!
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Old 11-07-2013, 04:56 PM
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David Analog David Analog is offline
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Originally Posted by imyourmaster View Post
David, thanks for the clarification. I am installing a 200A resettable circuit breaker on a 1/0 awg power wire between the battery and the distribution block. The distribution block will feed two amplifiers (SD6 and MHD 600/4) by means of a 4 awg wire to each amplifier.

Is in necessary to add a smaller fuse on the 4 awg wire between the distribution block and each of the amplifiers?

Thanks!
In some applications a fuseblock of smaller capacity fuses is a good practice when you go through a wire gauge conversion. The reason for the smaller and redundant fusing is that it might be possible for a shorted 4-gauge extension power wire to catch surrounding materials on fire before an inordinately large master fuse or breaker would trip. Whether or not you feel this step is required for safety might depend on the distribution block location and length of smaller gauge wire after the distribution block. If the distribution block is on a remote amp mounting panel with very short extensions then the risk is really minimzed. On the other hand, if there is a scenario with greater exposure and risk after the wire gauge conversion because of distance or location then the fused distribution block becomes a safety necessity.
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Old 11-07-2013, 11:08 PM
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imyourmaster imyourmaster is offline
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Originally Posted by David Analog View Post
In some applications a fuseblock of smaller capacity fuses is a good practice when you go through a wire gauge conversion. The reason for the smaller and redundant fusing is that it might be possible for a shorted 4-gauge extension power wire to catch surrounding materials on fire before an inordinately large master fuse or breaker would trip. Whether or not you feel this step is required for safety might depend on the distribution block location and length of smaller gauge wire after the distribution block. If the distribution block is on a remote amp mounting panel with very short extensions then the risk is really minimzed. On the other hand, if there is a scenario with greater exposure and risk after the wire gauge conversion because of distance or location then the fused distribution block becomes a safety necessity.
David, again, thanks so much for the input. This has helped me shorten my shopping list...I saved a buck or two and didn't have to go through Geico!
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