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Old 09-22-2017, 10:53 AM
Carts2Wheels Carts2Wheels is offline
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Antifreeze or not?

First year winterizing my '88 PS190 with 351W engine. Boat will be stored in NE Ohio, in my heated garage that never gets below 50-55F.

Is antifreeze really necessary?
Pros/Cons?
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Old 09-22-2017, 11:01 AM
06SUPERDUTY 06SUPERDUTY is offline
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I would still do antifreeze even if it isn't going to get that cold, what if the power goes out and you loose your heat and besides you don't want water sitting in your engine during down time causing more rust, and if you just drain it rust will still happen, even tho it does have water in it the rest of the time the antifreeze will help keep it away while it sits during the winter, just my thought anyway.
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Old 09-22-2017, 11:06 AM
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Miss Rita Miss Rita is offline
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Quote:
Is antifreeze really necessary?
IMO, no.

I live in a dry climate, I always drain everything, there is no humidity here. My boat is stored outside, temps get to 20 below at times.

Proponents of AF will say that it prevents freezing (hard to freeze if your boat is in a heated garage, or if there's no water in the engine) and that it prevents internal corrosion. It's hard to have corrosion if the inside of the block is dry.

I would say that if you don't plan to drain everything, put some RV antifreeze in there. I think it's easier to drain the block then to add AF.

It's your choice.

Last edited by Miss Rita; 09-22-2017 at 02:46 PM.
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Old 09-22-2017, 11:53 AM
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mustangtexas mustangtexas is offline
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The rust idea is tough to use as the reason as your manifolds and block have water sitting in them 24/7 throughout the boating season. 7 months or more for me. Draining and leaving plugs out would allow evaporation of what little is left. I could see using antifreeze as a safety net if you live in the far north. Tell me if I'm missing something.
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Old 09-22-2017, 12:00 PM
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JimN JimN is offline
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Originally Posted by Carts2Wheels View Post
First year winterizing my '88 PS190 with 351W engine. Boat will be stored in NE Ohio, in my heated garage that never gets below 50-55F.

Is antifreeze really necessary?
Pros/Cons?
Never say "never". What happens if you get a hard cold snap that lasts more than a week and the power lines come down?
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  #6  
Old 09-22-2017, 12:26 PM
Carts2Wheels Carts2Wheels is offline
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Originally Posted by JimN View Post
Never say "never". What happens if you get a hard cold snap that lasts more than a week and the power lines come down?
A little more detail:
My garage is built into a hill under my house, most of it located below the frost depth in Ohio (42"). In the past, I haven't even opened my diffusers in it and it's stable at 50-ish. This year, I'm actually planning on opening the vents so it should be a tad warmer.

Regardless, OH is a humid climate and rust could be an issue.
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Old 09-22-2017, 12:30 PM
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JimN JimN is offline
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Originally Posted by Carts2Wheels View Post
A little more detail:
My garage is built into a hill under my house, most of it located below the frost depth in Ohio (42"). In the past, I haven't even opened my diffusers in it and it's stable at 50-ish. This year, I'm actually planning on opening the vents so it should be a tad warmer.

Regardless, OH is a humid climate and rust could be an issue.
How awful. You must be miserable.
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Old 09-22-2017, 01:09 PM
Carts2Wheels Carts2Wheels is offline
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Originally Posted by JimN View Post
How awful. You must be miserable.
LOL! Right...it doesn't suck when it comes to storing or working on things over the cold, dark, grey winter. HA!
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Old 09-22-2017, 04:22 PM
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JimN JimN is offline
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Originally Posted by Carts2Wheels View Post
LOL! Right...it doesn't suck when it comes to storing or working on things over the cold, dark, grey winter. HA!
I put a heater in my garage and when one of my van's shocks broke in the cold part of January a few years ago, I fired it up, got my tools together and jacked it up. Took all of fifteen minutes and I almost broke a sweat.
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Old 09-22-2017, 04:47 PM
88 PS190 88 PS190 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mustangtexas View Post
Draining and leaving plugs out would allow evaporation of what little is left. I could see using antifreeze as a safety net if you live in the far north. Tell me if I'm missing something.
But permits such issues as allowing things to build nests in the manifolds.

If that's my garage I don't bother dumping the water I'd just suck a few gallons of pink through it and call it a day.
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