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  #51  
Old 07-16-2013, 11:42 AM
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Re: the double boot vs rear toe plate, Nate Smith uses an RTP and he's run 2@43. So it's definitely all about feel.
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  #52  
Old 07-16-2013, 11:46 AM
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may have to order the drills... lol no internet in Ontario where I am headed....lol
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  #53  
Old 07-16-2013, 12:13 PM
88 PS190 88 PS190 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMLVMI View Post
Re: the double boot vs rear toe plate, Nate Smith uses an RTP and he's run 2@43. So it's definitely all about feel.
I have a theory - it is primarily that an RTP really lets you get the rear angle as close as possible to the front ankle.

This to me is probably the single biggest advantage. We are seeing lots of modifications being performed to rear bindings - particularly to rear hardshells, the R-style from Reflex - people removing/cutting cuffs on rear binders, or running an elastic instead of a top cuff buckle. But I think the biggest single thing that is required is getting the rear toes darned near on top of the back of the front binder.

My theory is that since most humans past the age of puberty lose flexibility at the hip, since you have to move your hip back to your rear binding, we tend to rotate our hips to that side, this lets us get our rear foot back to the binding and our heel down, in reality to get to this position with out making ourselves even more unbalanced/uneven we need to work on hip flexiblity and minimize the amount of disparity between the limbs as much as possible.

Heel freedom gives you functional leg length as you can lift your heel a bit if you need to get the hip forward. Otherwise if you have a hardshell and the foot locked down on the heel, and limited flexiblity you're getting dragged back onto the rear foot - and who needs that! Not that an RTP fixes it. And it does create more issues at the same time.
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  #54  
Old 07-16-2013, 01:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 88 PS190 View Post
I have a theory - it is primarily that an RTP really lets you get the rear angle as close as possible to the front ankle.

This to me is probably the single biggest advantage. We are seeing lots of modifications being performed to rear bindings - particularly to rear hardshells, the R-style from Reflex - people removing/cutting cuffs on rear binders, or running an elastic instead of a top cuff buckle. But I think the biggest single thing that is required is getting the rear toes darned near on top of the back of the front binder.

My theory is that since most humans past the age of puberty lose flexibility at the hip, since you have to move your hip back to your rear binding, we tend to rotate our hips to that side, this lets us get our rear foot back to the binding and our heel down, in reality to get to this position with out making ourselves even more unbalanced/uneven we need to work on hip flexiblity and minimize the amount of disparity between the limbs as much as possible.

Heel freedom gives you functional leg length as you can lift your heel a bit if you need to get the hip forward. Otherwise if you have a hardshell and the foot locked down on the heel, and limited flexiblity you're getting dragged back onto the rear foot - and who needs that! Not that an RTP fixes it. And it does create more issues at the same time.

Great write up -...
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  #55  
Old 07-16-2013, 01:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 88 PS190 View Post
I have a theory - it is primarily that an RTP really lets you get the rear angle as close as possible to the front ankle...

Heel freedom gives you functional leg length as you can lift your heel a bit if you need to get the hip forward. Otherwise if you have a hardshell and the foot locked down on the heel, and limited flexiblity you're getting dragged back onto the rear foot - and who needs that! Not that an RTP fixes it. And it does create more issues at the same time.
The folks I ski with tell me that I am over the back of the ski all the time and every time I try to distribute weight evenly it does feel "weird" and I resort to old habits. I'm running Wiley High Wraps right now; I might try an RTP to see if "cheating" my heel up will help me achieve that balance.
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  #56  
Old 07-16-2013, 01:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMLVMI View Post
The folks I ski with tell me that I am over the back of the ski all the time and every time I try to distribute weight evenly it does feel "weird" and I resort to old habits. I'm running Wiley High Wraps right now; I might try an RTP to see if "cheating" my heel up will help me achieve that balance.
Translation: You're tail riding... And you can't effectively turn the ski that way.

I don't think a toe plate will fix that. Think about pressing down with 60-70% of your weight on the front foot. If you're wondering if you got it right, your front knee should be pushed forward - even with your toes...

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  #57  
Old 07-16-2013, 01:23 PM
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Originally Posted by TxsRiverRat View Post
Translation: You're tail riding... And you can't effectively turn the ski that way.

I don't think a toe plate will fix that. Think about pressing down with 60-70% of your weight on the front foot. If you're wondering if you got it right, your front knee should be pushed forward - even with your toes...

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Going to start doing some dry land drills on the off days and then work on this. I'm headed to Coble in Sept. and hope to have at least my form fixed by then, if not my skiing
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  #58  
Old 07-16-2013, 01:31 PM
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Going to start doing some dry land drills on the off days and then work on this. I'm headed to Coble in Sept. and hope to have at least my form fixed by then, if not my skiing
Two of the hardest things I have tried to learn:

1. Putting all that weight on the front leg

2. Rolling on to the inside edge on the pre-turn... I am still struggling with it
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  #59  
Old 07-16-2013, 01:33 PM
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I'm late to the party on this but my advise is to ski behind a direct drive dedicated slalom tug so that you can see and feel the difference with your wake crossings. I think you will be amazed at the difference you will feel (not feel) compared to the boat you are skiing behind. The wake used to always intimidate me also because I was always skiing behind IO's with big wakes. Once I skied behind a true ski boat there was no turning back. It is so much easier to maintain proper form when you are not fearing a dreaded face plant with every wake crossing. A couple years ago I was invited to ski behind a friends V Drive and as soon as I got back there and saw the size of that wake the old intimidation factor kicked in again and I went into survival mode. If you intend to be a dedicated slalom skier you will probably be boat shopping after you go to ski school.
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  #60  
Old 07-16-2013, 01:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TxsRiverRat View Post
Two of the hardest things I have tried to learn:

1. Putting all that weight on the front leg

2. Rolling on to the inside edge on the pre-turn... I am still struggling with it
Really it seemed liked you did that in your video's.

mike
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