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  #1  
Old 04-29-2013, 06:08 PM
dtm dtm is offline
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Installing slalom course

Anyone have any good instruction for putting in permanent course in lake? We need to replace our course (anchors and all) in a private lake @ 7' deep. Need some ideas on anchor design, method of placement, and surveying from water surface. We can lower lake to @ 3-4 feet if necessary.
Thanks!
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Old 04-29-2013, 07:00 PM
88 PS190 88 PS190 is offline
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You should probably just join ball of spray for that one lots of site surveyers and such on there.

Also skier to skier often has good information for you.
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Old 04-29-2013, 07:24 PM
rodltg2 rodltg2 is offline
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I suggest same thing. Ed at EZ slalom could probably help as well.
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  #4  
Old 04-29-2013, 07:25 PM
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east tx skier east tx skier is offline
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Agree with checking at ball of spray. But for the time being:

Screw/auger anchor (check mobile home supply stores or google mobile home anchor). We use those on our course and even the galvanized types have held up well for decades. Concrete forms with stainless eyelets and rebar bent through them to grab the lake bottom can work well, too. Use stainless cable to the subs and either shock cord or surgical latex for the buoy line.



If you are on a private lake, I think surveying from the land might be a better plan. I have found that using measured sections of low/no stretch rope will get you very close, certainly within tolerance.
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Last edited by east tx skier; 04-29-2013 at 07:35 PM.
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Old 04-29-2013, 07:27 PM
88 PS190 88 PS190 is offline
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Some lakes a stainless mainline ez slalom course - which holds tolerance by itself - and two good anchors at either end.

Then you can tension from shore, and if required slack the mainline, pull yourself back to an anchor, unclip and pull the whole course from the lake.

Doesn't sound useful until it is.
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Old 04-29-2013, 07:41 PM
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east tx skier east tx skier is offline
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Talk to Ed about how much depth you need for a portable. Also, with the portables, you might want to not use the cone type boat guides. They can tend to float it too much if you are running in lower depth water. If you go that route, stainless is a must and engine blocks make good anchors.
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  #7  
Old 04-29-2013, 08:57 PM
liledgy liledgy is offline
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The portables, accufloat, quick etc. have worked well for our private lake. Another private lake by mine (I used to ski there) has used two steel pipes on each side of lake for each set of balls. They run a rope across lake and put a few bricks on the rope to keep it down. We used strips of innertube with a knot on the end to connect the balls, the innertube strenched of the water level increased. Once in a while a ball would pull thru the knot, no problem, just pull the knotted strip back thru. If one set of balls was off a touch you just go to where the rope was attatched to the pipe and put a wrap or two around it to keep it straight. This location held the Midwest regionals many, many times in the 80's and 90's. it's a very, very accurate, cheap and low maintenance system once you have your pipes accurately put in. Our lakes are narrow where the course is, probably less than 300'.
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Old 04-29-2013, 08:59 PM
Big tic Big tic is offline
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I manage a concrete plant in Atlantic Canada. We often fill small containers with left over concrete for cottagers to anchor seadoos, floating docks, etc. I bet if you go by your local concrete plant with some coffee for the drivers they would make you some concrete anchors with the left overs. Bring your own mold (5 gallon pail) and chain to cast in the anchor.

Hope this helps.
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Old 04-29-2013, 09:04 PM
88 PS190 88 PS190 is offline
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Concrete is eh - it doesn't weigh that much under water, a 100 lb concrete block on ground is ~ 60 pounds underwater.

SO you struggle moving a heavy block that once you drop into the lake doesn't weight that much. Less weight with rear driven through it to keep it from sliding on the bottom fixes some of those problems.
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Old 04-29-2013, 09:14 PM
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BARE5 BARE5 is offline
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We use the 5 gallon pails for ski jump.
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