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Old 12-15-2017, 04:05 AM
MDB1056 MDB1056 is offline
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Boat: 1983 Starts & Stripes Powerslot, 92 Hydrodyne Comp
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Shaft Alignment 83 SS

I'm wanting to check the shaft alignment on the 83 Stars & Stripes Powerslot project / rescue boat I just acquired and am looking for some guidance please. Got some great info from a TT member earlier but have some questions. I've attached some pictures to help

1. Is the .003 gap the maximum gap or the specific gap to make sure is there between the couplers? Mine looks to have NO gap. Does this look normal?

2. What are the two metal set screws and the safety wire?

3. Is the exposed keyway in the shaft that shows normal?

4. Why all the putty around the stuffing box etc in the bilge? I've seen this same in others pictures but wondering why.

5. I've read that the coupler bolts should be OUT to do the alignment , set the gap, then rotate both couplers by hand 90 degrees, gap, repeat, reinstall bolts. Is this correct?

How hard should it be to turn the shaft by hand at the prop? I can turn it at the prop but it takes two hands

The bolts in the couplers and the set screws and safety wire certainly don't look original, in fact look like recently replaced. So someone has been in there. The boat was neglected for years before I acquired, so have been going through everything. Any guidance appreciated. My first MC. Other boat is 92 Hydrodyne Comp. Now thinking I should check shaft alignment on that one too!

thanks much!
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Old 12-15-2017, 07:44 AM
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Take two hands to turn Prop...

More than likely the motor and shaft are out of alignment with the shaft strut if it takes two hands to turn the prop...you can pour a bit of water on the shaft above the strut to help lubricant the strut bearing to see if the shaft & prop turns with one hand, normally a one hand prop turn is quick check once pulling the boat out of the water onto the trailer. Hence when pulling the boat out of the water the packing nut is wet, also the strut bearing and shaft are wet/lubricated for the one hand prop turn test...helps a bit, but still should turn with one hand if stored on the tailer a bit, just kind of a dry turn feeling.

Max .003 gap

In order to check the gap between the coupler flanges Important factors"

First, flanges need to be separated.

2. Second, The drive shaft needs to be centered and supported in the log shaft hole as while checking the gap between the flanges/couplers.

Really the most Critical part to the hole alignment thing is to have the drive shaft centered in the log shaft hole and supported. I do a dry mock up fitment first. I separate the flanges, remove the coupler off the drive shaft end, remove the packing nut, remove the the hose clamps and rubber hose. I now have an unobstructed view of the drive shaft going through the log shaft hole. Lets get the drive shaft centered and supported in the log shaft hole. I use an old flat piece 6 groove serpentine belt, cut the length so it just wraps the drive shaft O.D. I Pulled the drive shaft out of the log shaft hole and slide the drive shaft back in with the piece of belt I cut to support and center the drive shaft in the log shaft hole. You may half to find something similar to wrap around the drive shaft to center and support the drive shaft in the drive shaft hole, different sized drive shaft and log shaft holes, but that is the "CRITICAL" part.

Once the drive shaft is centered and supported in the log shaft hole, reinstall the coupler end to the drive shaft without installing the packing nut or hose. Slide the now installed drive shaft couple towards the transmission coupler. Probably way off, thats ok...now the fun starts, set the gap requires moving the motor up/down or side to side. Get the alignment set, pull the coupler back off, reinstall the hose, packing nut, coupler.

Problems can arise, but solutions are available. Would recommend new strut bearing if you decide to do this yourself.
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Old 12-15-2017, 08:04 AM
waterlogged882 waterlogged882 is offline
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If you haven't separated the two flanges yet, there is a step that can tell you a lot before you separate the flanges.

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Last edited by waterlogged882; 12-15-2017 at 09:00 AM.
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Old 12-15-2017, 12:33 PM
MDB1056 MDB1056 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waterlogged882 View Post
If you haven't separated the two flanges yet, there is a step that can tell you a lot before you separate the flanges.

.
FullPass - THANK YOU for the great information. Yes - I'm a do it yourselfer for 99% of things so this included. First time, but doesn't sound hard, just a little time consuming.

I was thinking I should get a new strut bushing anyway for good measure as I'm replacing everything else .

Waterlogged - What is the step you refer to that can tel me a lot up front please?

Is there anything else in the packing nut I shold be looking to replace? I know I have wax rope with the double nut etc on my Hydrodyne but that's not the case on this MC.

thanks for all the help. will be back with updates

Mark...............
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Old 12-15-2017, 03:34 PM
waterlogged882 waterlogged882 is offline
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When I made that statement I was thinking you were exploring to find a possible cause and fix, instead of a complete overhaul (best option in my opinion).

My point was this; when loosening the four coupler bolts just take them loose and before you go prying and yanking the assembly, approach the coupling to move two flanges easily apart and see how they come apart: easy and without resistance or does one spring out and away from the other in the parallel direction. If the later is the case, you'd know if the alignment was in a bind (now a moot point). This is more so for troubleshooting to see if an alignment is in need or a vibration etc. could be from another cause.

My take on your original post:
1) Best to be within 0.003" or closer.

2) set screws are just that. The wire is there to insure that they do not back out (there is a correct wiring protocol for that reason).

3) Keyway is OK like it is.

4) The putty appears to be a feeble attempt to slow or stop a water leak. Those shaft logs are embedded in fiber cloth and not very well. They tend to leak anywhere around that area. I have seen it on multiple occasions and fixed a few myself.

5) Bolts must be out. Otherwise you're just pee'n up a rope....

Do a full alignment but only after you remove the shaft, replace the strut bearings, reinstall the shaft and I recommend removing the shaft packing gland assembly and adding a dripless seal system, thus no more packing rings, ever. No better time than now.

You should know to expect and how to remove the flange from the shaft. There are two different configurations and one easy way to use threaded rod to remove the flange from the shaft. Some are pressed on with a keyway and some are on with a nut / keyway so don't go wrestling the bear until you know what you are up against. The standard transmissions are easy with lots of room to work. The added gear reducer is a little more confined with less available space but it is easy enough once you learn to use the threaded rod method.

One rule of thumb here and it is the absolute rule of getting this correct: everything you do with your driveline revolves around the strut. The thru-hull hole is secondary in consideration although not unimportant. Do not use the engine location placement, the shaft flanges, or the thru-hull hole as the baseline reference point. The strut has to be right (straight and plumb). If it is off the boat, you can add the cutlass bearings while on the work bench (much easier). Just make sure you have the strut mounted properly (if it is bent, replace it or fix it). Otherwise you will not get satisfactory results.

One thing to anticipate is the engine mounts being frozen or seized. They have to move up and down and sideways to get the alignment completed. I have seen more than one that had to be replaced in order to have the proper way to move the engine up and down. Last one I did this year had to have all four mounts replaced before anything would move.

Use the front mounts for larger movements and the rear mounts for the small and tweaking increments of movement.

On top of all of this, everything had to be in co-linear alignment from the strut to the front of the engine. Things cannot be catty-wompassed from point to point. It all needs to align within reason to get the synergistic results of piece-to-piece work.

Cutlass bearings and dripless seal systems can be had retail or I may be able to assist otherwise for a discount but in all fairness to my connections, we'll have to discuss in a private message.

Replace your rudder seals while you have it apart.

Doing this process is easy. The best laid plan of mice and men lies within knowing what to do, when to do it, what not to do the hard way, and how to not do things that will require taking things back apart.


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Last edited by waterlogged882; 12-15-2017 at 04:43 PM.
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Old 12-15-2017, 10:41 PM
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MD

All good info, from waterlogged... just takes time to type..What I use to center the driveline, Trying to make things less complicated. Point A TO Point B...Point A is the center of the Log shaft Hole, Point B is the center of the Rudder. The strut with the drive shaft installed should be directly behind the rudder falling in line with Point A and B...if the strut is not, could be a couple reasons, drive shaft not centered in log shaft hole, bent strut, strut mount location off. MD you could take a look and see if the driveline/strut falls behind the rudder. Second, under the boat looking at the driveline going up through the log shaft hole, see if the shaft is Centered or off center, might appear to be almost touching top/bottom or a side of the log shaft hole.

That will get you started.
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Old 12-16-2017, 12:40 PM
MDB1056 MDB1056 is offline
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Waterlogged and Fullpass - Thank you gentlemen both for all the time and information. Gives me plenty to get this going. Will keep you posted!

MDB.......................
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