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Old 02-27-2017, 01:53 PM
Maverick Maverick is offline
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Boat: 88 prostar 190 w/ 351
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88 prostar gunnel rebuild

Hey everyone, have a question, I'm rebuilding my gunnels for the boat. Of course the vinyl is toast on them. I was trying to think on what to do for recovering them. Of course there is new vinyl, which is what I think would look the cleanest, but has anyone done their gunnels in carpet? I have a lot of extra carpet at the house and was thinking about going that route to save some pennies. Opinions or ideas?
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Old 02-27-2017, 02:13 PM
gweaver gweaver is offline
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I opted to get rid of the gunnels as a way to increase space in the boat. Ran carpet up the sides, built boxes for the speakers and then had a piece of aluminum bent up to put a finished edge on things.


It really helped make the boat seem larger. I built storage under the rear seat, so losing the storage area in the gunnels wasn't a big deal.
Not sure if the photo will show up, but I can email a copy if it doesn't.

G
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Old 02-27-2017, 02:25 PM
Maverick Maverick is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2016
Boat: 88 prostar 190 w/ 351
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Very nice, I unfortunately don't have a rear bench seat.. have to think of something to makeshift a back bench. So I need some sort of storage. I thought about making two seats in the back with a hump in the middle that would act as a step, then making storage compartments under those. Not sure yet
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Old 02-27-2017, 07:50 PM
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Bouyhead Bouyhead is offline
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I also got rid of the lower portion of the coaming pads of of my 88' and 96' ProStar. Definitely opens up the floor space a bit. Some guys on here have done some neat stuff with the rear seats.
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Old 02-27-2017, 10:28 PM
Maverick Maverick is offline
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Yea I'd love to see some of the ideas. When I search for them kind of get the same ones, like gweavers, I've looked at his a lot, but I don't have the seat to do it.
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Old 02-28-2017, 01:36 AM
gweaver gweaver is offline
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It'd be tough to find the post, but a year or so ago, there was a guy on here in a similar predicament- he ended up installing two helm seats in the back, one on each side. Something like this, as I recall. Yeah, it's a little odd, but the new ProStar has a similar sort of arrangement.



The new ProStar



Or there's this route: LINK

G
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Old 02-28-2017, 07:24 AM
Maverick Maverick is offline
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Thanks I like I like the reconstructed rear bench, I'll try that. Where would I get the styrofoam from? I know I'll have to shape it to how I want it, but is spray foam? Inserts?
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Old 02-28-2017, 09:46 AM
gweaver gweaver is offline
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Mcmaster has sheets of foam LINK, might be possible to use that to form the base and back, then a layer of softer, open cell foam over that, then the vinyl skin. The nice thing about your 88 is that the seat isn't curved, so no weird angles to deal with. I think I'd build it in two parts- base and back. Build the frame for the back similar to the link above- 1/2 x 1 sticks, then 1/8 plywood to 'skin' it on the 'inside'. Glue styrofoam to the plywood, then your comfort foam over that. attach the vinyl, staple to the back of the frame, then another piece of 1/8 ply for a finished look on the back. Build the seat base as a box, then build separate cushions that are removable to access storage.
If you do an image search for 'couch frame', you'll get an idea of what I mean- you're just building a basic wooden frame to provide structure and strength for the seat back. Once you get all the wood cut to size, mix up some 2-part epoxy, add some acetone to thin it down, then paint that on the wood. It'll soak in and help waterproof it. Then assemble the frame. You could probably assemble then apply epoxy, but that would joints uncoated. Although, if you assembled it with Gorilla Glue and stainless screws, I think you'd be OK if you epoxied after assembly, but don't cover up the screws, or you'll never get them out.

Wood is relatively cheap, just take your time and measure multiple times before cutting. Got a buddy who's a woodworker? This actually sounds like a fun project- if you were in my area, I'd be down to help out.
G
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Old 02-28-2017, 10:56 AM
Maverick Maverick is offline
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Thank you sir! How much foam did you use on yours? So I can justify how thick each layer should be. My uncle is really good with wood work, he is who is helping me rebuild my gunnels. My biggest worry was where to get foam from, but now i should be good to go.
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Old 02-28-2017, 02:40 PM
gweaver gweaver is offline
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I had a rear seat in mine, so I didn't have to build from scratch. I don't have the boat anymore, but if I had to guess, I'd say the foam was about 2-2.5 inches thick on the back,with about 2 inches of open cell foam for comfort/cushioning. Keep in mind, that styrofoam was forming the structure of the seat.

If you're building a seat form out of wood, you really only need styrofoam to provide some support and something to glue the open cell foam to. Having said that, styrofoam isn't very strong, so you'll need to make sure it's well supported. Maybe a better idea is to build the seat frame from wood and then put a sheet of 3/32" plywood on the front then attach the cushion foam to that. It'll be a bit heavier, but far stronger and more durable.

If you can, try to find a place local that sells seat foam and go down and sit on a bunch of different types of foam. I spent about an hour trying foam, and ultimately settled on using two different densities (and thicknesses) of foam- a thick high density foam for the 'base' and a thinner, lighter density foam glued on top of that for a more comfortable, supportive feel. (Before you ask, this was 3 years ago, I have no idea what densities I used. ) You might also find that what you like for the seat cushions might not feel as comfortable on the back of the seat, so play around with it.

G
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