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  #1  
Old 09-30-2017, 08:07 PM
BaLuna BaLuna is offline
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Raised lettering on transom

I am finally getting around to working on my 205v Prostar. I started removing decals in preparation for cleaning up the hull. When I removed the lettering on the transom the “ghost” lettering behind the decal seems to be raised. It is quite noticeable when you run your fingers over it. Has anyone else encountered this? Do I need to wet sand to even everything up? Try to get the exact same lettering and put it back in the exact same place when I finish with rubbing compound and polish?

Let me know what you all think.




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  #2  
Old 09-30-2017, 08:28 PM
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mikeg205 mikeg205 is offline
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very common.... will be difficult to get it perfect.

vinyl shrinks from new - you'll get close but not perfect
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Old 09-30-2017, 08:58 PM
waterlogged882 waterlogged882 is offline
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When you took those decals off, that is what the gel originally looked like and to your question, wet sanding the other parts of the gel is the result of what you would like to achieve for the entire boat; to look like the areas under the stickers.

Back to the other point, it will be difficult to get it perfect, however a good sanding (if indeed the rest of the boat is actually as crappy as it looks) with multiple passes of different and progressively finer grit paper, then finish it out with the proper 3M products, that thing will look like new. Don't start with a 400 grit only to find out you should have used a 1200 grit on the first pass. The better the results with the proper (finer) grit to start with.....the less work for you.....start at 2000 and work backwards until you find the cut that you need. Use a sanding block.... It will look ugly all the way through until you get on the fourth of fifth pass with the 3M products, then it comes to life.

The trick to this entire endeavor is to learn what you need to do the job (education, materials, tools) and be patient with the labor effort. It takes a little while to make it work properly. Did I mention patience?

That boat will clean up nicely.

Then get a new set of stickers, put them on, and accept it for what it becomes. It will look great.

PS ==> patience and take your time. It won't happen in half a day or even a weekend.

best luck

.
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Old 09-30-2017, 11:25 PM
BaLuna BaLuna is offline
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That’s for the insight. I’ve read some of the gel coat restoration threads, I’ll re-read, get my tools in place and settle in for a slow patient process .

One bit of clarification: when I am wet sanding should my objective be to bring down the raised thickness of the letters flush with the rest of the hull? Or is that what you’re referring to when you say that it will be hard to get it perfect?

Thanks for the input.


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  #5  
Old 10-01-2017, 06:58 PM
waterlogged882 waterlogged882 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BaLuna View Post
That’s for the insight. I’ve read some of the gel coat restoration threads, I’ll re-read, get my tools in place and settle in for a slow patient process .

One bit of clarification: when I am wet sanding should my objective be to bring down the raised thickness of the letters flush with the rest of the hull? Or is that what you’re referring to when you say that it will be hard to get it perfect?

Thanks for the input.


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For me (and without seeing your surface) I'd probably look to sand it down even but once you get to working on the surface, I think you will see exactly what will work best for the end results.

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Old 10-02-2017, 12:10 PM
88 PS190 88 PS190 is offline
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Have you tried goof off or other adhesive remover on the raised area?
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  #7  
Old 10-02-2017, 01:35 PM
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eurosysytem0 eurosysytem0 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 88 PS190 View Post
Have you tried goof off or other adhesive remover on the raised area?
My thoughts exactly. Sticky stuff remover and maybe some heat should get all the residue adhesive off to give you the flat surface. When I removed mine every letter left the adhesive behind.
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Old 10-02-2017, 04:41 PM
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bturner2 bturner2 is offline
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Depending on how crazy you want to get (or how good you want the end result) you'll want to remove at least the center grab bar to get an even result. As to the lettering..... I did a 97 ProStar this spring that looked as bad if not worse than what you have. Getting it perfect will be difficult if not near impossible as the UV damages the gelcoat even below the surface. You'll get it much, much better but perfect is a stretch.

The key as others have mentioned is in sanding only the amount off needed to get the desired end result. To do this you'll need a process that will include a series of sandings with various grits as well as rubbing out the effected areas with a series of different compounds.

After jumping into my project with 600 I quickly discovered I was starting off with far too aggressive grit. I also learned that the gelcoat had dirt embedded in it that would break free during the initial sanding and cause unwanted scratches. Below is the process that worked for me.....

1. Thoroughly wash/scrub the area to get as much dirt off as possible.
2. Use a clay bar on the area before sanding to pull out any dirt that the washing didn't get out (I was really surprised how effective this was).
3. Start the wet sanding process with 1000 - 1200. You're going to be much further ahead sanding more with finer paper than trying to remove deeper scratches.
4. Only sand using a rubber block. If you don't use a block you'll tend to sand groves into the gelcoat. I got a 4"x 2" rubber block from O'Reiley's that was perfect for the job.
5. I like to work on a single section so I can perfect the process required area then move to the next. Knock the surface down until the entire surface is flat being sure to rinse/clean your sand paper frequently. Then move to the next finer paper.
6. Once the sanding is done you're off to wheeling out the area you just finished. I like the 3M perfect it products which you can buy as a system. You can find information on them here....

http://3mmarine.com/products/compounds-polishes/buffing

They have full videos on how to approach the restoration process.

I like to run through the entire process section by section so I can see if I need to adjust my choice of initial sanding grit. With my rather badly weathered transom 1000 was all I needed. When I moved on to areas that were less damaged I adjusted to 1500 then just the compounds.

Every boat is going to be different but you're always going to be farther ahead using the least aggressive tool/product possible to get the job done.
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  #9  
Old 10-03-2017, 12:00 AM
BaLuna BaLuna is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2016
Boat: Prostar 205V
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Tried using some goo gone adhesive remover. It took off the remaining adhesive behind the letters but it appears the gel coat is still raised though there is no adhesive there. I used a hear gun to remove the vinyl letters initially. Didn’t see the difference in thickness anywhere else on the boat behind letters.

Thanks for all the good info. I’ve got some 800, 1000, and 1200 grit paper and the 3m marine compound and finishing, and the perfect it machine polish. Have a DA polisher from harbor freight. I’m in the process of continuing to clean and remove the upholstery and grab rails from the interior and exterior. The interior of the boat also needs quite a bit of work it appears. Lots of oxidation and chalky residue all over. It’s basically a hit and start over job on the whole boat.

Thanks for all the great info!


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