Go Back   TeamTalk > Off Topic > Off Topic Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old 03-26-2013, 07:34 PM
JimN's Avatar
JimN JimN is offline
MC Master Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 11,447
Quote:
Originally Posted by Table Rocker View Post
I always understood a cold air intake to be a means of getting cool air to the intake instead of air that has been through the radiator (and possibly a/c condenser coil & aux transmission cooler). Cool air is denser and has the effect of more oxygen per cubic foot of air. A hood scoop that is sealed to the air cleaner housing would be an example of a cold air intake. Most cars have the air intake plumbed to a fender well or behind a headlight to get cool air.

Our boats don't have radiators obviously, so the air being sucked in via the vent hoses shouldn't be too hot. I have seen a motor box scoop on eBay or somewhere, but I doubt it would change performance much. Propping the motor box open a couple of inches would have the same effect.
At any speed above barely moving, the difference in temperature between hot air under the hood and ambient is minimal- at higher speeds, it's negligible.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 03-26-2013, 07:39 PM
JimN's Avatar
JimN JimN is offline
MC Master Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 11,447
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyle View Post
I had a '91 Chevy short bed reg cab. I put a throttle body spacer in it. That helped out a LOT. I also added a K&N filter and a superchips chip. You remove the cover to the ECM and plug the chip in and put the cover back on. Extremely easy. I could do a real nice burn out afterwards.

That added lots of cheap costing but very good power.


I upgraded a few years later to a '94 Chevy ext cab with 6" lift and over sized tires. I did the same exact mods to engine and added a set of gears to it. That truck was almost as fast and could boil the tires.


The upside down air cleaner won't do a darn thing for you. James is pulling your leg lol but I will admit I ran my air cleaner upside down but with a K&N filter. (Water will collect on the upside down dish when washing the engine or going mudding and the filter gets dirty fast)



The chip obviously works but the throttle body spacer itemizes the air fuel better. It is very well worth it. I can't say enough about the combo upgrade. It is very good bang for your buck without adding heads, cam, big boy expensive mods.

The spacer kind of compares to this analogy. Take a nitrous kit and install it on a TBI system through the air intake tube. If you put it close to the tbody it will work. Move it back 6"-8" away and that spray will romp the heck out of the system. It has more time to itemize. I had to repair many of DIY systems that came back into the shop bc the system did not work. All I did was move the nozzle away from the tbody.


The spiral cut in the tbody spacer spins the air and fuel so you get not only a better mix but more air. The engine is an air pump. More air is more power.



All I can say is if you spent the cash for a cold air kit vs a chip and spacer then don't expect a big gain. If you dyno by the seat of the pants then spacer and chip will be night and day. The cold air is the last item I would add. Not real noticeable.


Chip and spacer also helped gas mileage too. Although I gave it all back bc my foot got real heavy.


Chip prolly $100-$150

Spacer prolly $50 or so.
I just sold a '90 Silverado with the 5.7L TBI. One of the first things I did was remove the baffle in the cold air intake and it was a noticeable change. Added to the K&N, it wasn't bad but the comnflicting info I got about throttle body spacers made me hold off. If I get something like that again, I'll probably do it.

I'm waiting for the fuel line magnets- my Astro is gonna run wild with those! I just know it! Honest! They said they really work!
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 03-26-2013, 09:56 PM
Table Rocker's Avatar
Table Rocker Table Rocker is online now
MC Devotee
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Boat: '96 ProStar 205, Sammy Duvall, LT-1
Location: Fayetteville, Arkansas
Posts: 1,571
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimN View Post
At any speed above barely moving, the difference in temperature between hot air under the hood and ambient is minimal- at higher speeds, it's negligible.
I bet that is correct. About 300 cubic feet of air per minute being sucked in the intake and sent out the exhaust could keep the heat from building up too much.
__________________
'96 ProStar 205 SD LT-1
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 03-27-2013, 11:48 AM
east tx skier's Avatar
east tx skier east tx skier is offline
MC Hero
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Boat: 1998 Ski Nautique
Location: End of my rope.
Posts: 25,185
Stock air intake systems on many vehicles are designed to be quiet. The heat shielding aspect of these intakes is, as Jim mentioned, of minimal importance. What tends to happen is that these intakes and filters offer a less convoluted air flow path and improved flow at the filter.

On my turbo charged car, the heat shielding aspect makes even less sense since the compression at the turbo is going to heat the air up significantly. If I were worried about the heat, an upgraded intercooler would be a better way to go about it. But what the intake does achieve is a straightline path for intake air, which is a noticeable (butt dyno) feel versus the loop-the-loop intake on the stock motor.

I could probably improve it by removing the heat shield and leaving the filter stub there all by its lonesome. But the shield looks pretty cool.
__________________
Previous: 1993 Prostar 205

Red 1998 Closed Bow Ski Boat, Ford 351, 310 hp, Acme 4 blade, Perfect Pass SG.

FAQ


Tyler Ski Club


To me, this forum is about love of inboard boats. It is about the sharing of information and, on a good day, some humor. It is not about post count, brand of boat, or any other superfluous labels that lend themselves to a false sense of superiority. Please, respect one another, try to pass on accurate information, and keep your eye on the ball.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 03-27-2013, 01:13 PM
CantRepeat's Avatar
CantRepeat CantRepeat is online now
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Boat: 06 X30
Location: Roll Tide!!
Posts: 8,076
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimN View Post
At any speed above barely moving, the difference in temperature between hot air under the hood and ambient is minimal- at higher speeds, it's negligible.
You don't think the heat from then engine would raise the under hood temp enough to make a bigger difference even while moving? If for no other reason the increase in temp from the air being heated as it passing through the radiator into the engine compartment combined with the engine temp. More airflow at great speeds seem like it would be offset by the increase in exhaust temp passed into the engine compartment as well.

It seems that a lot of cars/trucks have ducted air to the intake which I thought increased HP from the cooler more dense air source.

I could be wrong. I'm just a rocket surgeon after all.
__________________
Tim
Gone, surfing.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 03-27-2013, 02:29 PM
1redTA's Avatar
1redTA 1redTA is offline
MC Devotee
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Boat: 1981 MasterCraft Limited 351W slot
Location: Pace, FL
Posts: 1,023
The cold air on my 96 TA , not ram air then, would show a big decrease in air inlet temps when moving over LT1 edit programming software. as soon as you got above 5-10 it would just drop even on south Alabama black top in summer
__________________
1981 MasterCraft
19' Skier 351W PowerSlot Deluxe
Long gone is the Trans AM waiting for another
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 03-27-2013, 02:56 PM
JimN's Avatar
JimN JimN is offline
MC Master Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 11,447
Quote:
Originally Posted by CantRepeat View Post
You don't think the heat from then engine would raise the under hood temp enough to make a bigger difference even while moving? If for no other reason the increase in temp from the air being heated as it passing through the radiator into the engine compartment combined with the engine temp. More airflow at great speeds seem like it would be offset by the increase in exhaust temp passed into the engine compartment as well.

It seems that a lot of cars/trucks have ducted air to the intake which I thought increased HP from the cooler more dense air source.

I could be wrong. I'm just a rocket surgeon after all.
At high speeds, the space under the hood isn't hot- it's very close to ambient temoerature. The only time it's hot is after the engine has been shut off/left to sit or if it only has the fan blowing air around. The engine and everything else is constantly losing heat and when the air is moving fast, it loses a lot of heat. The cooling surface area, coupled with high speed air flow cools extremely effectively.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:27 PM.