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  #11  
Old 03-11-2013, 10:09 PM
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96prostar190 96prostar190 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloaked View Post
Looks like the trailer is for a 205 model.

.
I thought so initially, but checked the serial number and it's for a 190... So crazy! I don't know how the dude I bought it from ended up with this trailer. I shoulda asked!
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  #12  
Old 03-11-2013, 10:10 PM
88 PS190 88 PS190 is offline
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Right, your pin needs to hit, but where the pin hits can be moved in most cases, it might require a welding shop to put a plate in there and some paint, but it can be shifted.

I had my factory trailer modified because it had that hinged bar which was garbage.
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  #13  
Old 03-11-2013, 10:16 PM
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Originally Posted by 88 PS190 View Post
Right, your pin needs to hit, but where the pin hits can be moved in most cases, it might require a welding shop to put a plate in there and some paint, but it can be shifted.

I had my factory trailer modified because it had that hinged bar which was garbage.
Hmm, never thought of that. Thanks for the idea! I'll have to take a look at that.
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  #14  
Old 03-11-2013, 10:20 PM
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Looks like a 205 trailer to me. Not sure about the serial number but the MC plate on the trailer should clearly state if it is a 190 or 205.

...anyway the cheep and easy fix would be to take it to a weld shop and have them move the front assembly back until your happy with the fit, otherwise post it here for sale and use the summer to find the right 190 trailer for your length. Good luck. Interesting how some boats loose their matching trailer???
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  #15  
Old 03-11-2013, 10:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barefooter92 View Post
Looks like a 205 trailer to me. Not sure about the serial number but the MC plate on the trailer should clearly state if it is a 190 or 205.

...anyway the cheep and easy fix would be to take it to a weld shop and have them move the front assembly back until your happy with the fit, otherwise post it here for sale and use the summer to find the right 190 trailer for your length. Good luck. Interesting how some boats loose their matching trailer???
I know right?! It's so crazy, I wish I woulda pulled my head out of my *** and asked him what happened to the original one! haha. It's def. a 190 trailer but you guys are making me question my self now. I'll have to look again tomorrow. Pretty positive it said 190... I guess we'll see.

Thanks for the help though!
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  #16  
Old 03-11-2013, 10:25 PM
88 PS190 88 PS190 is offline
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You see it more in the south.

Boats can stay in the water with no winterization, some are purchased with out trailer.

Others the trailers spend so much time sitting out in the weather that by the time you get to boats from the 80s or 90s the trailers have rusted and rotted.

Lastly trailers get stolen and they get damaged when blow outs occur.
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  #17  
Old 03-11-2013, 10:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 88 PS190 View Post
You see it more in the south.

Boats can stay in the water with no winterization, some are purchased with out trailer.

Others the trailers spend so much time sitting out in the weather that by the time you get to boats from the 80s or 90s the trailers have rusted and rotted.

Lastly trailers get stolen and they get damaged when blow outs occur.
Do you think this trailer will work for a while if I have to leave it on for a while? Like another year or two?
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  #18  
Old 03-11-2013, 10:43 PM
88 PS190 88 PS190 is offline
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Trailer fit is primarily where the support is in relation to the stringers in the hull, so long as those are adjusted (most can be slid) then its safe.

Its more a question of: Is it a pain to get the boat on/off?

Does the prop get endangered by the trailer supports?

Does it tow safely? Trailer fit is important due to where the weight sits, you need a safe % of tongue weight, boat too far forwards puts more weight on the vehicle, too far to the rear you get a light tongue, which causes the trailer to buck like a mule and makes towing unsafe.

I would personally slip the boat back on the trailer, then measure the weight distribution, or atleast make sure the tongue isn't super light.

Double axles tend to resist problems better than single axles which don't balance well and buck back and forth.

My folks have a I/O on a trailer that is too big, and it darned near put me in a ditch a few summers ago when I was pulling it to the upholstery shop. Single axle, boat is too far rearwards of axle, yet is as far onto the trailer as the bunks allow.

Larger boat would extend much further forwards and get some tongue weight on the tow vehicle. As is the low tongue weight lifts the back of the tow vehicle. I usually put all my full fuel cans in the bow before towing it now.
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  #19  
Old 03-11-2013, 10:45 PM
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I would look into moving the now stop back as others have suggested.

You can load the boat that way at the ramp and make sure there is still ample tongue weight before having the mid done. Then the trailer should be good for a long time.

This is all provided you have validated the bunks fit the boat nicely in the "new" position.

That is what I would try.
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  #20  
Old 03-11-2013, 10:46 PM
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96prostar190 96prostar190 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 88 PS190 View Post
Trailer fit is primarily where the support is in relation to the stringers in the hull, so long as those are adjusted (most can be slid) then its safe.

Its more a question of: Is it a pain to get the boat on/off?

Does the prop get endangered by the trailer supports?

Does it tow safely? Trailer fit is important due to where the weight sits, you need a safe % of tongue weight, boat too far forwards puts more weight on the vehicle, too far to the rear you get a light tongue, which causes the trailer to buck like a mule and makes towing unsafe.

I would personally slip the boat back on the trailer, then measure the weight distribution, or atleast make sure the tongue isn't super light.

Double axles tend to resist problems better than single axles which don't balance well and buck back and forth.

My folks have a I/O on a trailer that is too big, and it darned near put me in a ditch a few summers ago when I was pulling it to the upholstery shop. Single axle, boat is too far rearwards of axle, yet is as far onto the trailer as the bunks allow.

Larger boat would extend much further forwards and get some tongue weight on the tow vehicle. As is the low tongue weight lifts the back of the tow vehicle. I usually put all my full fuel cans in the bow before towing it now.
I've had no issues at all with it... driving it, getting the boat on and off etc... It's actually been pretty easy considering its the wrong trailer. I think the weights good also. The boats weight is supported I just worry about the wood breaking eventually in the back.
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