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  #21  
Old 02-28-2013, 08:41 PM
cewilkins cewilkins is offline
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thanks SWGA, I am planing on the same method your doing, What do you mean by (a/b) plywood iam up to date on most types of building lumber being in the construction industry but not sure what you mean, What about a cabniet grade plywood such as birch for the decking?
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  #22  
Old 02-28-2013, 08:55 PM
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A/B or A/C would be the plywood "grade". With higher grades the knots/voids are filled with patches so the panel is smooth. The A (top) side will be smooth and knots filled. The C (bottom) side the knots are not filled and left as the voids you see. I think any A/B or A/C plywood would be fine for the boat deck.

You would not want to use cabinet grade plywood (even though it is smooth/free of knots and voids) because the glue is not rated for exterior use. Look for something like ACX plywood. A (top) C (bottom) X for exterior glue.. Most big box home stores are going to carry ACX.

Hope this helps.
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  #23  
Old 03-01-2013, 06:51 AM
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Spend the money on marine ply. Exterior will delaminate over time. I have seen this in the wood boat forums I surf in...
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  #24  
Old 03-01-2013, 08:57 AM
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Use marine grade plywood. The glue used to bind the lamination together is able to withstand water. Anything else will not hold up well and you will be back at in a few years. Douglas Fir is the most commonly used wood for the stringers. Boat building websites such as Glen-L marine also recommend white oak. Not red oak, supposedly you can use red oak like a straw because it is so porous.
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  #25  
Old 03-01-2013, 09:31 AM
cewilkins cewilkins is offline
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Just watched some stringer replacment vidieos and these guys are saying not to let the stringer touch the bottom of the hull they put foam spacers in. I was just gona set mine down to the hull will this be ok?
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  #26  
Old 03-03-2013, 09:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CCAnderson View Post
Use marine grade plywood. The glue used to bind the lamination together is able to withstand water. Anything else will not hold up well and you will be back at in a few years. Douglas Fir is the most commonly used wood for the stringers. Boat building websites such as Glen-L marine also recommend white oak. Not red oak, supposedly you can use red oak like a straw because it is so porous.
And if you use white oak make sure you rough it up of the epoxy won't bond.
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  #27  
Old 03-05-2013, 07:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psychobilly View Post
And if you use white oak make sure you rough it up of the epoxy won't bond.
Not to high jack the thread, but the douglas fir I have for my stringers is 2x rough cut. I had planned on either sanding them or running them through a planer. Do you think the rough cut will make for a better bond. I plan on coating with slow kick resin/styrene before bedding the stringers in the boat. What do you think? This may also give the OP some points to ponder....
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  #28  
Old 03-06-2013, 01:13 PM
cewilkins cewilkins is offline
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I picked my douglas fir stringers up today from the local lumber yard, Man thats some pretty wood, Why is douglas fir the best choice for stringers?, Iam planing on beding my stringers in with resin and aerosil mix, I got to get yall some pics up LOt more grinding to do. I guess iam going to go with marine plywood for the deck, 99 dollars a sheet though! I cant seem to get a straight answere on using it, If the glue is the same in exterior grade ply wood then what would be the defference?
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  #29  
Old 03-06-2013, 01:55 PM
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thatsmrmastercraft thatsmrmastercraft is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cewilkins View Post
I picked my douglas fir stringers up today from the local lumber yard, Man thats some pretty wood, Why is douglas fir the best choice for stringers?, Iam planing on beding my stringers in with resin and aerosil mix, I got to get yall some pics up LOt more grinding to do. I guess iam going to go with marine plywood for the deck, 99 dollars a sheet though! I cant seem to get a straight answere on using it, If the glue is the same in exterior grade ply wood then what would be the defference?
Marine plywood has more layers with a more perfect finish. Marine plywood is a little prettier than the exterior grade plywood, but since the plywood is being used for a carpeted floor, there really isn't a reason to use anything other than ACX.

Defining Exterior Grade
Exterior sheets of plywood are graded with the letters A through D for each side, and the letter X that represents it has been made for exterior use. Plywood has a front and a back, and the front or face of the plywood will always be a better grade than the back. The letter A signifies that the plywood has no knots or blemishes, is sanded smooth on the face, and is suited for fine finishing. The letter D is the lowest quality of plywood, and is used most often for construction purposes. There is no need for construction grade plywood to be blemish free or finely sanded.


Read more: What Is Exterior Grade Plywood? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_6609028_ex...#ixzz2MmrkcTyl
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  #30  
Old 03-06-2013, 02:26 PM
cewilkins cewilkins is offline
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Thanks thatsmrmastercraft, So you agree that I would be just fine using a ACX or a BCX grade plywood?
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