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  #5101  
Old 09-22-2010, 03:38 PM
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Originally Posted by TX.X-30 fan View Post
Sunday, September 19, 2010 3:14 AM EDT


Colleges: Where the money goes

By Andrew Hacker and Claudia Dreifus


Williams College in Massachusetts charges $41,434, or an inflation-adjusted 3.2 times what it did 30 years ago. The University of Southern California's current tab of $41,022 is a 3.6 multiple of its 1980 bill.

Tuition at public universities, in a time of ailing state budgets, has risen at an even faster rate. The University of Illinois' $13,658 is six times its 1980 rate after adjusting for inflation. San Jose State's $6,250 is a whopping 11 times more.

If you look at how that added revenue is being spent, it's hard to argue students are getting a lot of extra value. Why? Colleges aren't spending their extra revenues, which we calculate to be about $40 billion a year nationally over 1980 revenues, in ways that most benefit students.

One thing colleges are spending more on is athletic teams, which have become a more pronounced and costly presence on campuses everywhere. Even volleyball teams travel extensively these days, with paid coaches and customized uniforms. Currently, 629 schools have football teams, 132 more than in 1980. All but 14 lose money.

Williams College in Massachusetts charges $41,434, or an inflation-adjusted 3.2 times what it did 30 years ago. The University of Southern California's current tab of $41,022 is a 3.6 multiple of its 1980 bill.

Tuition at public universities, in a time of ailing state budgets, has risen at an even faster rate. The University of Illinois' $13,658 is six times its 1980 rate after adjusting for inflation. San Jose State's $6,250 is a whopping 11 times more.

If you look at how that added revenue is being spent, it's hard to argue students are getting a lot of extra value. Why? Colleges aren't spending their extra revenues, which we calculate to be about $40 billion a year nationally over 1980 revenues, in ways that most benefit students.

One thing colleges are spending more on is athletic teams, which have become a more pronounced and costly presence on campuses everywhere. Even volleyball teams travel extensively these days, with paid coaches and customized uniforms. Currently, 629 schools have football teams, 132 more than in 1980. All but 14 lose money.
Now I don't fee; so bad about having a lousy football coach who lost to the South Dakota Coyotes.
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  #5102  
Old 09-22-2010, 06:42 PM
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Top College Football Revenues
Texas $60.9 million
Ohio State $60.8 million
Georgia $58.7 million
Michigan $50.4 million
Florida $48.2 million


Top College Football Profits
Georgia $44.1 million
Texas $42.5 million
Michigan $37.6 million
Florida $32.4 million
Ohio State $28.5 million

This was two years ago.
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  #5103  
Old 09-22-2010, 09:21 PM
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Originally Posted by DemolitionMan View Post
Top College Football Revenues
Texas $60.9 million
Ohio State $60.8 million
Georgia $58.7 million
Michigan $50.4 million
Florida $48.2 million


Top College Football Profits
Georgia $44.1 million
Texas $42.5 million
Michigan $37.6 million
Florida $32.4 million
Ohio State $28.5 million

This was two years ago.
Sweet!!!
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  #5104  
Old 09-22-2010, 10:09 PM
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Found this on Forbes.

Forbes' Most Valuable College Football Teams
Ten college football programs last year brought in at least $45M in revenues, compared to none five years ago, according to Peter Schwartz of FORBES. The Univ. of Notre Dame at $101M is the "most valuable team in college football." The school's athletic department operates "under the umbrella of the university and is not run as its own distinct entity," and as a result a "much higher share of profits are retained by the school for academic use." The Univ. of Texas was the "most profitable team last season, earning $46.2[M], of which $4.7[M] went to academics." Premium and club seating at Texas' Darrell K. Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium generates $12M per year. Of the 20 most-valuable teams, 16 have undergone "major stadium expansions and renovations" over the past ten years, and three others have renovation plans "in the works." Meanwhile, TV arrangements will "only further drive up" team values. Big 12 Conference schools will see a "$16[M] boost in TV revenue" next year from existing deal with FSN and ESPN, with "some schools projected to make as much as $10[M] in 2008, based on thier number of TV appearances and scheduling" (FORBES.com, 11/20)

RK SCHOOL VALUE PROFIT NOTES
1 Notre Dame $101M $45.8M Contributed $21.1M to academic programs last season, more than any other team; $9M from NBC each year
2 Texas $92M $46.2M Earns $12M annually from premium seating, which will rise with 44 new luxury suites and 2,000 club seats in their stadium before kick-off next season.
3 Georgia $90M $43.5M $60.3M in football revenue last season highest in SEC.
4 Michigan $85M $36.2M Will add 83 luxury suites and 3,200 club seats to "The Big House" next year at a cost of $226M.
5 Florida $84M $38.2M Football revenue increased by $11M, to $58.9M, during their national-title season last year.
6 LSU $76M $31.7M Addition of an eighth home game helped LSU's value increase 11% in one year.
7 Tennessee $74M $17.3M* Four Neyland Stadium renovation projects in ten years added more than 10,000 seats and 78 suites.
8 Auburn $73M $33.9M Each season, Tigers home games result in an estimated $50M of incremental spending in Lee County, Ala.
9 Alabama $72M $31.8M Coach Nick Saban's $4M average annual salary is highest in college football history.
10 Ohio State $71M $26.6M At $59.1M, led the Big Ten in revenue last season, but also led all of college football in expenses. Also spent $32.5M on football, 71% of that on game days.
11 Oklahoma $70M $18.5M '04 renovation to stadium, which added 27 suites and 2,500 club seats, leading to increased revenue
12 South Carolina $69M $28.9M South Carolina's value increased 22% over the course of the last year, more than any other team in the top 20.
13 Penn State $69M $29.4M Sells out each game with nation's second-largest stadium
14 USC $53M $13.0M Most-valuable program in the Pac-10 has seen a 7% increase in team value over the past year.
15 Arkansas $53M $19.3M Each home game results in $7.3M of incremental spending throughout the county.
16 Texas A&M $50M $20.5M Projects $9.5M in broadcast revenue next season.
17 Washington $50M $19.9M AD is lobbying for support of expansion to stadium, as well as the creation of a new "Huskies Athletic Village."
18 Nebraska $49M $12.4M Tom Osborne just named new interim AD
19 Michigan State $44M $18.3M Plans to increase contributions to academics as a result of revenue from the Big Ten Network.
20 Wisconsin $43M $14.3M Fell five spots in the rankings owing to a $7.6M drop in football profit since last year.

NOTES: * = Football program was directly responsible for $16.2M in donations to the Volunteer Athletic & Scholarship fund via ticket reservation fees.

METHODOLOGY: Rankings are based on what the football programs contribute to four important beneficiaries: their university (the value of contributions from football to the institution for academic purposes, including scholarship payments for football players); athletic department (the net profit generated by the football program ultimately retained by the department); conference (the distribution of bowl game revenue); and local communities with a vested interest in the team (incremental spending in the county during home-game weekends). The Forbes system weighs those four elements in declining order.
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  #5105  
Old 09-22-2010, 10:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TX.X-30 fan View Post
I do have a clue compadre, look at the degrees and if thats true in bama then more power to bama buts its not nationwide and look at the degrees. The quarterback example is anecdotal at best.

Look more at what these football programs spend and then look at the steadily rising tuition's at these universities, these programs may pay for some sports but virtually nothing goes back to education. What is a college for anyway to promote education or football? The major programs are only part of these universities in name .

Just as in the nation as a whole the priorities at most have been hijacked.
TX, just because I love to argue with you......

During The National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame’s 46th Annual Awards dinner, before a sold out crowd at the Waldorf-Astoria, it was announced by NFF Chairman, Jon F. Hanson, that Craig Krenzel of The Ohio State University was the 2003 Vincent dePaul Draddy Award winner. Often referred to as the “Academic Heisman,” the Draddy Award is given to the nation’s top scholar-athlete and awards a $25,000 postgraduate scholarship. Krenzel is one of 15 national scholar-athletes that were recognized.

Seldom does a player rise to the top of both the academic and athletic world like Craig Krenzel has. His 3.68 GPA in Molecular Genetics proves his academic prowess, and his leadership on the gridiron led Ohio State to their first National Championship in 32 years. Named 2003 Academic All-America of the Year, Krenzel received The Sporting News Socrates Academic Award and recorded a perfect 4.0 in four quarters. A three-time Academic All-BIG TEN Conference selection, he received the Ohio State Academic Achievement Award three times, Dean’s List recognition six times and the Ohio State Exceptional Academic Award 11 times.

Under center, Krenzel led the Buckeyes to a perfect 14-0 season including a victory over top-ranked and defending national champion Miami in the 2003 Tostitos Fiesta Bowl, of which he was named Offensive MVP. A Second Team All-Conference pick, Krenzel compiled 2,478 yards of total offense in 2002, 5th best all-time at OSU. Named Archie Griffin Offensive Player of the Year and voted OSU’s Co-MVP for the 2002 season, he ranks eighth all-time with over 4,300 career passing yards. Named 2003 Team Captain, Krenzel is a frequent visitor to the James Cancer Hospital and Children’s Hospital. A speaker at numerous engagements, he also volunteers at a local food pantry, charity fundraisers and during Right To Read Week.

Past recipients of the award include: Brandon Roberts, Washington University in St. Louis (2002); Joaquin Gonzalez, University of Miami (2001); Kyle Vanden Bosch, University of Nebraska (2000); Chad Pennington, Marshall University (1999); Matt Stinchcomb, University of Georgia (1998); Peyton Manning, University of Tennessee (1997); Danny Wuerffel, University of Florida (1996); Bobby Hoying, Ohio State University (1995); Rob Zatechka, University of Nebraska (1994); Thomas Burns, University of Virginia (1993); Jim Hansen, University of Colorado (1992); Brad Culpepper, University of Florida (1991); Chris Howard, U.S. Air Force Academy (1990).

College football playing student-athletes must be a senior or graduate student in their final year of eligibility, have a grade point average of at least 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale), have shown superior academic application and performance, have outstanding football ability as a first team player, and have demonstrated outstanding leadership and citizenship to be eligible for The National Football Foundation’s Scholar-Athlete Awards.

With 119 chapters and over 13,000 members nationwide, The National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame, a non-profit educational organization, runs programs designed to use the power of amateur football in developing scholarship, citizenship and athletic achievement in America’s young people. NFF programs include the College Football Hall of Fame in South Bend, Ind., PLAY IT SMART, The NFF Center for Youth Development Through Sport at Springfield College (Mass.), the NFL-NFF Coaching Academy, and scholarships of nearly $1 million for College and High School Scholar-Athletes.

Two Buckeyes winning award since 1990.
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Last edited by captain planet; 09-23-2010 at 12:08 PM.
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  #5106  
Old 09-23-2010, 06:41 PM
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Did OHIO st. really spend 30 million dollars last year on its football program?? Justify that priority and yes others schools spent tooooooo much but you guys spent the most........
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  #5107  
Old 09-24-2010, 09:56 AM
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Originally Posted by TX.X-30 fan View Post
Did OHIO st. really spend 30 million dollars last year on its football program?? Justify that priority and yes others schools spent tooooooo much but you guys spent the most........
Not going to respond to the Vincent dePaul Draddy Award post, eh TX?
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  #5108  
Old 09-24-2010, 10:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TX.X-30 fan View Post
I do have a clue compadre, look at the degrees and if thats true in bama then more power to bama buts its not nationwide and look at the degrees. The quarterback example is anecdotal at best.

Look more at what these football programs spend and then look at the steadily rising tuition's at these universities, these programs may pay for some sports but virtually nothing goes back to education. What is a college for anyway to promote education or football? The major programs are only part of these universities in name .

Just as in the nation as a whole the priorities at most have been hijacked.
FWIW TX, I went to Kent State and we all know what a powerhouse the Golden Flashes are in football. Every year I attended KSU, the tuition was raised the maximum amount (5%) it could be raised in a single year. In the 6 years I went to school, the tuition was raised 34% from the time I walked onto campus until the time I walked off campus. Based on the stands in Dix Staduim....they aren't making much on football.
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  #5109  
Old 09-24-2010, 10:11 AM
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I think TX point is that the as the football programs are so profitable, that money should be sunk back into the school to keep the tuition from rising as much as it has. This would go a long ways to improving the quality of education the STUDENTS get as well as opening up the ability of less forunate to attend college as well. God knows that in iteself would go a long ways toward improving the overall success of the public as a whole...
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  #5110  
Old 09-24-2010, 02:29 PM
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Without football there would be far less money going into education and about 400 student athletes that were no longer receiving scholarships. Seems to me that's a bad idea. Maybe I am jaded because my two schools are making a profit in the Athletics Departments and donating money back to the overall operating budgets.

I can see if a school was losing money where there could be a problem but you still have to take into account the number of scholarships awarded. Remove that amount from the "loss" and see if it is still a loss.

I know at Alabama all athletic scholarships are full value. The AD has to pay the University the max cost of an education. No discounts at all and since a good portion of the SA's are from out of state that amount is much higher than a normal student tuition would be.
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