Go Back   TeamTalk > Off Topic > Off Topic Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-07-2017, 10:31 PM
lopott's Avatar
lopott lopott is offline
TT Regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Boat: 2013 X30 6.0L
Location: Midwest
Posts: 51
House wifi

Just bridging off previous audio thread. I have previously run a router and extender but hAve problems when extender will not drop device as you move away and into the router area.

In comes mesh/whole house wifi.
As far as I can tell consumer systems are Orbi,eero,luma, and google.

What would you do?
Walls are open should I link them via cat 5?

New house 4500 sq ft attached 3 car garage with upstairs apartment and detached by 50 ft. 3 car garage.

I have cat 5 tools. Will need YouTube to remember how to build connector.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-08-2017, 02:12 AM
h_2_o h_2_o is offline
TT Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Boat: 89 Prostar 190
Location: midwest
Posts: 376
ubiquiti
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-08-2017, 02:38 AM
JimN's Avatar
JimN JimN is offline
MC Master Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 12,735
Quote:
Originally Posted by lopott View Post
Just bridging off previous audio thread. I have previously run a router and extender but hAve problems when extender will not drop device as you move away and into the router area.

In comes mesh/whole house wifi.
As far as I can tell consumer systems are Orbi,eero,luma, and google.

What would you do?
Walls are open should I link them via cat 5?

New house 4500 sq ft attached 3 car garage with upstairs apartment and detached by 50 ft. 3 car garage.

I have cat 5 tools. Will need YouTube to remember how to build connector.
Hard wire anything that's not portable.

I haven't used it but I may try the Eero to test it- since I'm a dealer, I can return it within 30 days if I don't think it will work for my applications but as I posted in the other thread, look for devices that are 802.11k/r compliant.

Pick one-

https://www.utm.edu/staff/leeb/568/568.htm

If you'll be using a structured wiring enclosure with network punch-down panel(s), you have a choice but if you use the small modules that mount in a panel and have 8 ports, use 568A because that's how they're marked- trying to use 568B becomes confusing and servicing it later will be more difficult.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-08-2017, 03:03 AM
lda6339 lda6339 is offline
MC Fanatic
 
Join Date: May 2016
Boat: 2016 Mastercraft X-30 6.0L
Location: Dallas Texas
Posts: 827
Not sure what router you have, but we have an Apple Time Capsule and two Apple Air Port Extremes. The airport extremes are set to wirelessly extend the time capsule, so its 3 devices but one network. You're phone or computer will switch from router to router as you move about the house to whichever is capable of providing the fastest internet. Wasnt cheap but is well worth it. You can get our wifi signal almost anywhere on the 1/2 acre property. I'm also pretty sure that the airport extreme doesn't need an apple router that sends out the main signal in order to be set up in extend mode. Its also an easy set up, can do it from an app on your iphone or any laptop.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-08-2017, 05:25 AM
jafo9's Avatar
jafo9 jafo9 is offline
MC Devotee
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Boat: 2002 X30 LTR
Location: Southeast
Posts: 1,056
I agree with JimN. I'd wire anything I could. I did the whole house wifi thing at our main residence with bridges/extenders and while functional, I finally gave up and made several runs of CAT6 (same tool at CAT5 iirc) to the places I needed speed and reliability (particularly for HiDef streaming). I did put one of the new(er) alien looking Netgear routers at the lake house, and I am very impressed with its signal strength. A lot of this may have to do with the fact that there isn't much interference as we don't have a bunch of neighbors with their own wifi networks competing for channels.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-08-2017, 06:20 AM
h_2_o h_2_o is offline
TT Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Boat: 89 Prostar 190
Location: midwest
Posts: 376
I did not read it correctly yes hard wire as much as possible and put in extra where you think you might need it. since it is open wire the ceiling areas for wifi for future proofing it. as far as wifi i still say ubiquiti best bang for the buck for home and small to medium business use.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-09-2017, 10:46 AM
DHPRO's Avatar
DHPRO DHPRO is offline
TT Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Boat: 2014 Gen II X30 SS
Location: NorthEast
Posts: 359
Hard wiring is preferred whenever possible. I use EERO at my weekend place and Apple Time Capsule/extenders at home. Extenders are notoriously weak as they operate on only 1 band and the bandwidth gets degraded - my house isnt big and open concept, anbd this latter setup ***!
EERO isnt cheap (~$500 for 3), but my experience so far has been exceptional (customer service likewise). I did have an issue with the type of modem interfacing between EERO and Apple TV, but once I changed it out system is flawless. Essentially costs about the same as one of those alien looking routers and mesh setups.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-09-2017, 11:52 AM
kscrib's Avatar
kscrib kscrib is offline
TT Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Boat: 2015 X23 w/ 6.2
Location: Midwest
Posts: 395
Cat 6 is a bit thicker wire than Cat 5. Which means you need to match punch down and wire. As far as functionality, they both use the same RJ45 end piece. I went with cat 6 since some of my runs were longer than 100 ft. There are a lot of little difference in the cables, I went for Cat 6 that was certified at 550 MHz. That is supposed to get GB speed at 300 feet. I have a two 225 ft runs that are both getting GB speed, so it is working for me.

Running conduit in open walls gives you opportunity to make changes later. I created a network rack in the basement and ran conduit to several places that would be impossible to run cable later. It is time consuming, but I hope it provides flexibility in the future. Who knows, some day we may need fiber runs in house and I will have the ability to do that if needed.

Moving from one AP to another looks to take to protocols (802.11r and 802.11k). I am still researching that, but it looks like both the client (phone/tablet/etc) and the AP have to support it.

Since my last post on the audio thread, I found that Netgear WAC7x0 APs supports 802.11k. I enabled that last night, but did not spend any time to see if moving throughout the house was better.

Wish I was closer, I would come help you wire.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-09-2017, 12:24 PM
JimN's Avatar
JimN JimN is offline
MC Master Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 12,735
Quote:
Originally Posted by kscrib View Post
Cat 6 is a bit thicker wire than Cat 5. Which means you need to match punch down and wire. As far as functionality, they both use the same RJ45 end piece. I went with cat 6 since some of my runs were longer than 100 ft. There are a lot of little difference in the cables, I went for Cat 6 that was certified at 550 MHz. That is supposed to get GB speed at 300 feet. I have a two 225 ft runs that are both getting GB speed, so it is working for me.

Running conduit in open walls gives you opportunity to make changes later. I created a network rack in the basement and ran conduit to several places that would be impossible to run cable later. It is time consuming, but I hope it provides flexibility in the future. Who knows, some day we may need fiber runs in house and I will have the ability to do that if needed.

Moving from one AP to another looks to take to protocols (802.11r and 802.11k). I am still researching that, but it looks like both the client (phone/tablet/etc) and the AP have to support it.

Since my last post on the audio thread, I found that Netgear WAC7x0 APs supports 802.11k. I enabled that last night, but did not spend any time to see if moving throughout the house was better.

Wish I was closer, I would come help you wire.
Cat5e is rated at 350MHz at 350 meters- there's almost no house that needs Cat6 unless they want to be ready for 10-20 years out and by that time, I would hope they would have changed to fiber.

If the router supports k/r, it will be better than if it doesn't. Best case is a mesh network or using a managed switch and access points and it's really coming to that, but really, it's only needed for people who want seamless roaming/fast handoff. If they stay put most of the time, it only requires local WiFi, preferably not extending to the area covered by another access point.

I use Venn diagrams as a similar concept whn I explain this to people and oddly, many remember those from Math class (even though a lot of people would say "I don't know why I have to learn this- I'll never use it after I graduate"). Another analogy is that a router is like a desk lamp- put it in the corner of a house and there's not much chance that it will cover the whole place.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 01-09-2017, 01:00 PM
JimN's Avatar
JimN JimN is offline
MC Master Poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 12,735
Quote:
Originally Posted by lda6339 View Post
Not sure what router you have, but we have an Apple Time Capsule and two Apple Air Port Extremes. The airport extremes are set to wirelessly extend the time capsule, so its 3 devices but one network. You're phone or computer will switch from router to router as you move about the house to whichever is capable of providing the fastest internet. Wasnt cheap but is well worth it. You can get our wifi signal almost anywhere on the 1/2 acre property. I'm also pretty sure that the airport extreme doesn't need an apple router that sends out the main signal in order to be set up in extend mode. Its also an easy set up, can do it from an app on your iphone or any laptop.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Is your Extreme roughly 4" x 4" and about 6" tall? That IS a router, but all of the Airport devices can be used in Bridge mode, with no NAT and DHCP (a bit of a waste, since the Airport Express is only $99).

FYI- if you have the Express and want to place it in a spot that's not a table, desk, etc- Amazon has a mount for these that lets you put it just about anywhere and they come in white (if you want to mount an Airport) or black (for AppleTV). They're less than $15.

You have signal, but what about the speed of transmission? Using any device as a repeater cuts the speed in half- I have used Airport Express and Extremes, but always hardwired- the typical loss of speed is only a few Mbps and it's easy enough to do a speed test- Ookla has a site called www.speedtest.net; you need the app for a smart phone but it's a good tool. I also use Inssider to see how many networks are in the area, the signal strength, channel and it lets me walk a property with. the ability to see where I'll have problems, or not
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:16 AM.