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Old 08-29-2014, 09:45 AM
Theomedic Theomedic is offline
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Going to try surfing for the 1st time

We finally found a board to try out wake surfing. Found a good deal on a used Phase 5 from the next lake over. The Kids are super excited! It's not going to be the greatest since we have a 209 with stock ballast but we are going to give it a shot and have some fun! Any tips for us? Riding tips, set up, speeds? I'll post some pics if we have any success. Thanks, have a fun and Safe Labor Day Weekend!
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Old 08-29-2014, 09:51 AM
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mzimme mzimme is online now
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Lots and lots of weight in the back surf corner, go about 10-12mph. Watch this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQVayRd4VVw
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Old 08-29-2014, 10:10 AM
jgraham37128 jgraham37128 is offline
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I'll help you out.

There's brake and gas on a surfboard.

Gas means lean forward (front foot) , it will push you toward the boat.
Brake means pressure on the rear foot it will put distance between you and the boat.

All anyone has to do to surf without a rope is understand the gas and brake method, once they are up. If you stay in the pocket and adjust by gas and brake then you will surf as long as the boat can run...Or until your rear calf/foot can't take anymore!

You'll find that people will throw the rope in the boat and surf a minute and fall to far back and leave the wave. This is due to too much brake. Have them adjust by leaning forward. A great surfer knows you're on the gas a whole lot more than the brake.

I hope this helps and enjoy.
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Old 08-29-2014, 01:08 PM
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BMcD BMcD is offline
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Getting Set Up For Surfing

Congrats on entering the world of wakesurfing!

Best tips we have at Day1, go out and have fun, don't over think it, relax, and keep smiling.

OK, for the technical stuff:

Weighting/setup:
- You will need more than stock ballast in the long run. If you don't have ballast bags and a pump, play around with the position of people in the boat. You will need the majority of your weight in the surfside rear corner, also play with weight in the bow on the surf side. This will extend your wake and firm it up a bit
- Also try counterweight. Some boats need a little weight on the non-surf side to create the best wake. If you have the center KGB tank, really play around with that. Some people run with it full, some empty, and others anywhere in between. It really just depends on the boat and other weight that has been added (including people)
- Use a true surf rope, DO NOT try to use a ski line. This is a safety issue more than anything.

Driver:
- Ease your rider up, this is not waterskiing or wakeboarding. The term "hit it" doesn't really apply here.
- Take the slack out of the line, give the rider a little tension, then ease the throttle up (especially for beginners) so that they can roll up onto the board and stand up.
- Watch the board/rider. When the board goes from laying flat on the surface of the water to popping up onto the bottoms of the rider's feet, the rider will have enough resistance to stand and you can get to your 10-12 mph range without pulling the rider over on their face
- When the rider falls, back off the throttle and let the wake pass, turn to the non-weighted side of the boat, inside the wake you just created, so you don't swamp the bow

Rider:
- Place your heels on the heel-side edge of the board. While floating in the water you should be able to apply downward (not outward) pressure with your heels to the board and see the opposite rail begin to bob in the water, almost popping out. This is good. Once the boat is in motion you will want to push your heels to the bottom of the lake to engage the rail and get the board to pop up into the bottom of you feet.
- Make sure the board is perpendicular to the boat (between you and the boat). The start position is very similar to wakeskating and wakeboarding. If you've done this you will get right up.
- Have the driver take the slack out of the line so that you can begin to feel a little pull and are not going to get whipped when the boat accelerates.
- Tell the boat you are ready, with knees bent in to your chest (think fetal position), arms straight, and have them begin to throttle up.
- Don't try to pull yourself up, this is a technique and finesse sport. You will feel the board pop up onto the bottoms of your feet and will feel surface resistance on the water. Once you are going about 2-3 mph, feeling the resistance beneath you, try to stand up just as you would out of a chair or from a squatted position.
- Even though you are being pulled forward, do your best to stand up at the waist rather than breaking/bending at the waist. This will give you the greatest stability and ability to keep surfing. If you need to absorb waves, or changes in speed, try to do so with your knees. Every beginner breaks at the waist, so don't get discouraged. Once you are conscious of this, however, you can correct it, keep your shoulders and chest up, and have greater control of the board.
- Once up and riding, try to cheat your front foot to the toe-side rail. When you get up, both of your feet will be closer to the heel-side rail. On your board, you have a rear arch bar that will give you good bearing for your rear foot. Your front foot, however, will need to "crab walk" with your toes to get it closer to the toe-side rail. This will give you much better control of the board and direct the board to pointing the right direction.
- Square your hips to the wake. This is easiest to do once you move your front foot close to the toe-side rail. Many beginners feel they are being pulled away from the wake. By placing the rope in your front hand, putting your rear hand in the small of your back, and doing your best to point the nose of the board at the back of the boat, you will improve the likelihood that you can get the board going the right direction and into the sweet spot.
- When you fall, protect your head. Remember that duck and cover position? It is always a good idea to put your arms in front of your face and grab the back of your head. More than one rider has been bonked by a buoyant board that either got airborne or caught it's own wave right back into them. This is a really fun and relatively safe sport, it's too bad when a rider catches a fluke board to the head/face.

I'm sure I've missed some things and/or provided info slightly different than others may. There is also quite a bit of information to take in, so just go out and have fun. You will get a feel for what works and with any luck, everyone in the boat will be riding ropeless by the end of the weekend!

Enjoy the holiday!

BMcD
Day1 Wake

'06 X45 8.1L Surf Machine
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Old 08-29-2014, 01:27 PM
Theomedic Theomedic is offline
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Great info! Thanks, can't wait to get on the water. We appreciate the tips!
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  #6  
Old 08-30-2014, 12:02 AM
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blackhawk blackhawk is offline
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Biggest thing for me the first time was just getting up on the board. Here are the tips that I learned.
-Lay in the water, resting your heels on the board with toes facing up.
-As soon as you feel tension on the rope, push down on your heels to bring the board up to meet your toes.
-When the board comes up to your toes you will already start being pulled up by the rope and then you AND the board can just roll right up onto the water.

If you have done much wakeboarding, it will be pretty easy getting up if you remember to push down on your heels and get the board vertical before trying to stand up.
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Old 08-30-2014, 05:05 PM
Theomedic Theomedic is offline
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Thanks for all the advice. I got up first try and had a blast! Even tossed the rope, didn't go to far as we need more ballast, but it was fun. My daughter even got up as well. We'll try it again tomorrow. 20mph winds today ---
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Old 08-31-2014, 12:02 AM
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blackhawk blackhawk is offline
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Well done!
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Old 08-31-2014, 12:19 AM
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Aric'sX15 Aric'sX15 is online now
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Thats a hard board to learn on, well done
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Old 08-31-2014, 10:08 PM
Theomedic Theomedic is offline
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Youngest

Even the kids got up
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