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Old 02-11-2005, 03:24 PM
Ben Ben is online now
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Overhead Trailer Storage

I'm currently in process of doing some remodeling that will include a 2nd floor addition over my garage, and want to hang my trailer (without boat) from the ceiling for storage while boat is in the water. I was curious if anyone had seen anything done before or had any ideas.

The current plan is for 16" tall pre-fab wood I-joists for the ceiling. I'm trying to find a way to mount pulley's to the top (compression) side of the joists to pull the boat up with. One idea is a metal plate to span 2 or three of the joists at 3 locations to support the trailer. Then I could fasten a bolt or hook to the plate. Another idea is to replace 2 of the wood joists with steel I-beams and just weld something onto them. High steel prices probably would knock that one down though.

Any thoughts or suggestions would be welcome. I'm gonna figure 800 lbs or so for the tongue and 600 lbs or so for each back corner to give a saftey factor of about 2 for most calculations.
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Old 02-11-2005, 03:41 PM
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jayderwin1 jayderwin1 is offline
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do you have a boat dock you keep the boat at or do you just take it out for the day? what kind of trailer do you have?
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Old 02-13-2005, 10:24 PM
Ben Ben is online now
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House is on the lake, so boat will be on a lift / hoist. '94 MC trailer. THe lot is very small, so I don't want to leave the trailer in the driveway / yard.
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Old 02-14-2005, 12:07 AM
iokua iokua is offline
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Will there be anything directly on top of the joists? Have the joists been engineered taking into account the weight of the trailer? If not, span as many joists as you can to distribute the weight.

It sounds like you have the right idea.....I would not go with steel as you mentioned.....we've seen steel prices double in the last year in the commercial construction market.
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Old 02-14-2005, 12:27 AM
skimax
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I've seen this done before with the boat in a garage in Discovery Bay, Ca He had two ski boats on trailers hanging up above and was able to park two cars beneath.
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Old 02-14-2005, 01:05 AM
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AirJunky AirJunky is offline
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A neighbor of mine does this with a Hobie Cat trailer. He has the cable/pulley system in place & uses his truck to hoist the trailer up, then hooks shorter chains to the trailer to hold it up, and then releases the cable system.
Obviously this trailer is a lot less than yours. But I'm sure if you spread the load over several joists like your saying, it should work great.
Makes me wonder if it's possible to do in a carport I want to build in the near future!
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Old 02-14-2005, 07:23 AM
Ben Ben is online now
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Above the garage will be a storage room / attic (full height), so the joists will be on 16" centers. Since it is storage, I can have stuff coming through the floor if need be, for example, a cutout for the bow stop. The trailer will need to go up as high as possible, to clear the door when it's open. I'm planning to remove the guideposts to store it.

I have a pully setup at the current house for the truck cap, so I can remove / store it by myself, but I just bolted lagbolts into the bottom of the trusses since it only weighs about 200 lbs or so. Need to think a bit more for the 900 lb approx trailer. The main question is how to distribute the load over the top flange of a few beams. Probably will be 16" tall beams, I'll do all the math and stuff, then send it in for approval. The beams are really spec'd for distributed loading, which is why a steel plate sounds good, to spread it out nicely...
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Old 02-14-2005, 09:59 AM
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Thrall Thrall is offline
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Ben,
You definately need to have the joist system engineered for the add'l load. TJI's (Truss joists, as you described) are not your best choice for a hoist point. ANy cutting or modification will render them useless. If you ned 16" deep to span the garage, it's a pretty good span. Look at replacing a couple of the joists with LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber) beams designed to accept the additional load.
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Old 02-14-2005, 02:27 PM
iokua iokua is offline
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My only suggestion would be to think about using tube steel, angle iron, or C channel instead of steel plate across the top of the joists. Stronger shapes will spread the weight out more evenly across however many joists you decide to span. The plate will want to bend sooner and put more/most of the weight on the two joists adjacent to the lifting point.
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Old 02-14-2005, 03:13 PM
Ron Grover Ron Grover is offline
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I am not an engineer but I have done quite a bit of construction in my career.

HAVE YOU HAD AN ENGINEER CALCULATE LOAD CAPACITIES ON THE GARAGE STRUCTURE? I WOULD BET THE STRUCTURE WAS NOT DESIGNED TO ACCOMODATE THAT TYPE OF LOAD vertically or laterally!

Without the proper prep and engineering I can envison a picture of your trailer sitting on top of your car and your garage on top of your trailer.

My advice would be to check out a lift. No engineering and if you move you take it apart and take it with you. Plus no pulleys and hoists putting strain on your house structure.

As a FYI, (not endorsing this company) I did a quick search on google and for under $2000 a 4 post lift can be bought. http://www.directlift.com/

Just my $.02

Ron
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