Go Back   TeamTalk > General MasterCraft Topics > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-07-2007, 12:24 PM
causewayskiier causewayskiier is offline
TT Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Boat: 1992 MC Prosport 205, 285 HP
Location: Mobile, AL
Posts: 105
Engine block freezing

Anybody have an idea how cold it has to get and for how long before there is a risk of engine damage? I un-winterized my boat then the temp dropped to around 27 I think, just wondering If that is cold enough to do damage?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-07-2007, 12:27 PM
east tx skier's Avatar
east tx skier east tx skier is offline
MC Hero
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Boat: 1998 Ski Nautique
Location: End of my rope.
Posts: 25,334
Stored inside or out? When you dewinterized your boat, did you run the engine in the water or just get it ready for the water?
__________________
Previous: 1993 Prostar 205

Red 1998 Closed Bow Ski Boat, Ford 351, 310 hp, Acme 4 blade, Perfect Pass SG.

FAQ


Tyler Ski Club


To me, this forum is about love of inboard boats. It is about the sharing of information and, on a good day, some humor. It is not about post count, brand of boat, or any other superfluous labels that lend themselves to a false sense of superiority. Please, respect one another, try to pass on accurate information, and keep your eye on the ball.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-07-2007, 12:53 PM
JKTX21's Avatar
JKTX21 JKTX21 is offline
MC Devotee
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Boat: 1996 Prostar 190, 350 EFI, PP, 13th Floor Tower
Location: Fort Worth
Posts: 1,012
Ooops, the link I wanted to post has been deleted.

If your boat was indoors, it would have to be 27 degrees for a pretty long time to freeze your block. If the temperature just went down to 27 for the night, you should be ok.
__________________
"I'm too drunk to taste this chicken."

Last edited by JKTX21; 03-07-2007 at 12:55 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03-07-2007, 01:31 PM
Skibumtx's Avatar
Skibumtx Skibumtx is offline
TT Regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Boat: Mastercraft Tristar, 89, 351
Location: Houston & Woodville TX
Posts: 70
I had the same question, the temp in Woodville TX dropped to 24 overnight a week ago; the boat is in a sling/boathouse about 2 feet over 60 degree water. I figured it would be alright and I did not want to drive 2 hours each way to fix it.

What does it take to freeze a block? I would think it would take a couple of days where the temp did not get above 32. Not much of a chance to winterize the boat this year, temp has been in the 50s-70s almost all winter.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-07-2007, 01:46 PM
Leroy
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
There isn't a clear answer because there are so many variables.

Google expansion force of ice and similar terms for some interesting reading. The science says when Ice freezes it expands 10%.


Jim Stringer
Physiology, Palo Alto Medical Clinic, California One of water's most remarkable properties is that it expands when it freezes to a volume that is always 10% greater than in the liquid state. In other words, 10 cups of water put into the freezer is going to turn into 11 cups of ice when it freezes. This expansion takes place with tremendous force, as anyone knows who has left a full container of water with a tight lid in the freezer. The force is enough to burst the strongest water pipes if the water in them freezes, which is why people in cold climates sometimes leave a little water trickling through the pipes on freezing nights. It is not possible to make a usable pipe strong enough to withstand this force. Freezing water can burst a cast iron pipe over a foot thick. Water expands when it freezes because the molecules of water are actually closer together in the liquid state than they are in ice. Water molecules are polar, which means that they have positive and negative ends like little magnets. When water freezes, the molecules are held together in a rigid crystal pattern called a lattice, lined up with opposite charges next to each other. When the ice melts, the water molecules can tumble over each other and briefly get a little closer than they are in the solid crystal. This expansion is a very important phenomenon in the natural world. The force of freezing water is enough to crack open rocks and speed up the erosion of mountains. If water did not expand, then it would be denser when it froze, and would sink and soon cover the bottom of a lake or ocean. The oceans would fill with frozen water, and life as we know it in the oceans and on land would not be possible.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-07-2007, 01:57 PM
kpickett's Avatar
kpickett kpickett is offline
TT Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Boat: 1994 Prostar 190 - LT1
Location: Northern California
Posts: 374
I haven't had a block freeze, but I talked about it with my mechanic. He told me that in his experience it needs to hit 26 degrees for three nights in a row to crack an undrained block....for what it's worth.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-07-2007, 02:10 PM
Bruce Bruce is offline
MC Fanatic
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Boat: 1999 MariStar 230 VRS 5.7 Indmar Vortec
Location: Lacombe, La.
Posts: 671
I am in the same boat (no pun intended) here. My boat is in a sling over water. I usually have lights in the engine compartment (V drive) to keep it warm. It warmed up I took out the lights closed the drain ran the engine with flush pro etc. Of course it turned cold again. 26 to 28 on a couple of nights. Local weather guy says 28 for four hrs. will freeze. I have observed that in my birdbaths. However, I don't think it is enough to bust a block. I guess I will find out in a couple of weeks.
__________________
"IT IS WHAT IT IS'
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-07-2007, 03:02 PM
Jesus_Freak's Avatar
Jesus_Freak Jesus_Freak is offline
MC Devotee
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Boat: Past: 1994 PS 205 --> Now: Nothing
Location: TN
Posts: 2,116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leroy
...If water did not expand, then it would be denser when it froze, and would sink and soon cover the bottom of a lake or ocean. The oceans would fill with frozen water, and life as we know it in the oceans and on land would not be possible.
Yes, and that is one of the many proofs God is amazing.

The biggest factor is time. How long does your boat experience x temperature? Environmental thermal changes have to diffuse into the water inside the block and then freeze some volume(s) of the water. These frozen volumes may be continuous or disperse. Obviously, to do damage, there has to be enough frozen to bridge a channel inside the block. In addition, I imagine that the crystalline structure of the frozen water (and hence its expansion compared to the liquid state) would have something to do with the rate at which it was frozen. So, I dont have the answer, but it can be solved.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03-07-2007, 03:34 PM
causewayskiier causewayskiier is offline
TT Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Boat: 1992 MC Prosport 205, 285 HP
Location: Mobile, AL
Posts: 105
Yea the boat was outdoors, with a cover on it, and an insulated motor box. I think the temp. was around 27 for 4-5 hours. I guess I'll know soon if everything is OK.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03-07-2007, 03:46 PM
Prostar Rich's Avatar
Prostar Rich Prostar Rich is offline
TT Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Boat: Mastercraft Prostar 190 1990 351 Ford
Location: Midwest
Posts: 348
4 to 5 hours would not be long enough to damge the block. You should be fine.

Prostar Rich


Quote:
Originally Posted by causewayskiier
Yea the boat was outdoors, with a cover on it, and an insulated motor box. I think the temp. was around 27 for 4-5 hours. I guess I'll know soon if everything is OK.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:37 PM.