Go Back   TeamTalk > Maintenance Tips, How-tos and Refurbishing Topics > Appearance

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #341  
Old 03-22-2011, 02:46 PM
Grantx15 Grantx15 is offline
TT Regular
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Boat: Mastercraft X-15ss 6.0
Location: East coast
Posts: 88

begging to be refinished!



light sanding on the first board of the deck, to compare.
the entire deck is now sanded and just waiting for some warm weather to finish it up with linseed oil / mineral spirits.

send some heat to NJ!

Last edited by Grantx15; 03-22-2011 at 02:58 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #342  
Old 03-22-2011, 03:36 PM
east tx skier's Avatar
east tx skier east tx skier is offline
MC Hero
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Boat: 1998 Ski Nautique
Location: End of my rope.
Posts: 25,221
This is an interesting write up considering how many people are mixing their own teak oil this year. The fact is that using linseed oil or tung oil cut with mineral spirits is not terribly dissimilar to what you can buy already mixed up. It may be cheaper for the bulk you are buying, but the primary difference appears to be some some UV protectants and mildew retardants in the commercially produced "teak oils." This seems like it will be beneficial over the long haul depending on how much exposure your platform has. It also explains the mineral spirits component in the Teak World method, but only suggests that it be used for the first coat. Anyhow, for what it's worth ....

Link

Oiling teak on boats is a time-honored tradition. Oil intensifies the colors and grain patterns of wood and gives the wood a rich, warm appearance. Because it simply enhances the inherent beauty of the wood---more like salt than sauce---oiling is arguably the most attractive of all wood finishes, and it restores some of the teak's natural oils and resins. Unfortunately, the benefit of oiling exterior teak is extremely transitory. The sorry truth is that teak will last just as long if you don't oil it-longer really, since repeated between---coat scrubbing wears the wood away. But oiling teak isn't about protecting the wood; it's about recovering and maintaining that golden glow that made us want teak on the boat in the first place.

Teak oils are primarily either linseed oil or tung oil, bolstered by resins to make them more durable. Linseed oil tends to darken the teak, but it is significantly cheaper. Tung oil doesn't darken the wood, and it is more water resistant than linseed oil-a notable advantage for boat use. However, a month or two after application, it may be hard to discern that much difference since both oils carbonize in the sun and turn dark. Proprietary teak oils address this problem with various additives, including pigments, UV filters, and mildew retardants. Some that perform admirably in one climate are reviled in another. If you are going to oil your teak, make your teak oil selection based on the recommendations of other boat owners in your area.

Apply teak oil with a paint brush. Immediately wipe up (with a spirits-dampened cloth) any drips or runs on fiberglass or painted surfaces, or the resins the oil contains will leave dark, nearly-impossible-to-remove stains. Watch out for sneaky runs below the rail.

Oiling requires multiple coats. The wood will initially "drink" the oil, and thinning the first coat about 20% with mineral spirits or turpentine encourages it to penetrate the wood more deeply. By the third coat, oil will begin to stand in some areas. Wipe up excess oil with a cloth. Continue to brush on the oil and wipe away any excess until the wood is saturated. The wood should have a matte finish without any shiny spots.
__________________
Previous: 1993 Prostar 205

Red 1998 Closed Bow Ski Boat, Ford 351, 310 hp, Acme 4 blade, Perfect Pass SG.

FAQ


Tyler Ski Club


To me, this forum is about love of inboard boats. It is about the sharing of information and, on a good day, some humor. It is not about post count, brand of boat, or any other superfluous labels that lend themselves to a false sense of superiority. Please, respect one another, try to pass on accurate information, and keep your eye on the ball.

Last edited by east tx skier; 03-22-2011 at 03:53 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #343  
Old 03-22-2011, 03:52 PM
east tx skier's Avatar
east tx skier east tx skier is offline
MC Hero
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Boat: 1998 Ski Nautique
Location: End of my rope.
Posts: 25,221
I just posted this in another thread, but it bears repeating

This is an interesting write up considering how many people are mixing their own teak oil this year. The fact is that using linseed oil or tung oil cut with mineral spirits is not terribly dissimilar to what you can buy already mixed up. It may be cheaper for the bulk you are buying, but the primary difference appears to be some some UV protectants and mildew retardants in the commercially produced "teak oils." This seems like it will be beneficial over the long haul depending on how much exposure your platform has. It also explains the mineral spirits component in the Teak World method, but only suggests that it be used for the first coat. Anyhow, for what it's worth ....

Link

Oiling teak on boats is a time-honored tradition. Oil intensifies the colors and grain patterns of wood and gives the wood a rich, warm appearance. Because it simply enhances the inherent beauty of the wood---more like salt than sauce---oiling is arguably the most attractive of all wood finishes, and it restores some of the teak's natural oils and resins. Unfortunately, the benefit of oiling exterior teak is extremely transitory. The sorry truth is that teak will last just as long if you don't oil it-longer really, since repeated between---coat scrubbing wears the wood away. But oiling teak isn't about protecting the wood; it's about recovering and maintaining that golden glow that made us want teak on the boat in the first place.

Teak oils are primarily either linseed oil or tung oil, bolstered by resins to make them more durable. Linseed oil tends to darken the teak, but it is significantly cheaper. Tung oil doesn't darken the wood, and it is more water resistant than linseed oil-a notable advantage for boat use. However, a month or two after application, it may be hard to discern that much difference since both oils carbonize in the sun and turn dark. Proprietary teak oils address this problem with various additives, including pigments, UV filters, and mildew retardants. Some that perform admirably in one climate are reviled in another. If you are going to oil your teak, make your teak oil selection based on the recommendations of other boat owners in your area.

Apply teak oil with a paint brush. Immediately wipe up (with a spirits-dampened cloth) any drips or runs on fiberglass or painted surfaces, or the resins the oil contains will leave dark, nearly-impossible-to-remove stains. Watch out for sneaky runs below the rail.

Oiling requires multiple coats. The wood will initially "drink" the oil, and thinning the first coat about 20% with mineral spirits or turpentine encourages it to penetrate the wood more deeply. By the third coat, oil will begin to stand in some areas. Wipe up excess oil with a cloth. Continue to brush on the oil and wipe away any excess until the wood is saturated. The wood should have a matte finish without any shiny spots.
__________________
Previous: 1993 Prostar 205

Red 1998 Closed Bow Ski Boat, Ford 351, 310 hp, Acme 4 blade, Perfect Pass SG.

FAQ


Tyler Ski Club


To me, this forum is about love of inboard boats. It is about the sharing of information and, on a good day, some humor. It is not about post count, brand of boat, or any other superfluous labels that lend themselves to a false sense of superiority. Please, respect one another, try to pass on accurate information, and keep your eye on the ball.
Reply With Quote
  #344  
Old 03-22-2011, 03:53 PM
CantRepeat's Avatar
CantRepeat CantRepeat is online now
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Boat: 06 X30
Location: Roll Tide!!
Posts: 8,115
Great info eastie!! Thanks.
__________________
Tim
Gone, surfing.
Reply With Quote
  #345  
Old 03-22-2011, 03:55 PM
east tx skier's Avatar
east tx skier east tx skier is offline
MC Hero
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Boat: 1998 Ski Nautique
Location: End of my rope.
Posts: 25,221
Quote:
Originally Posted by CantRepeat View Post
Great info eastie!! Thanks.
I had heard several years ago that teak oil was mostly linseed oil, but I couldn't remember the source. No matter the method or product you choose, it's good to understand it all a bit better.
__________________
Previous: 1993 Prostar 205

Red 1998 Closed Bow Ski Boat, Ford 351, 310 hp, Acme 4 blade, Perfect Pass SG.

FAQ


Tyler Ski Club


To me, this forum is about love of inboard boats. It is about the sharing of information and, on a good day, some humor. It is not about post count, brand of boat, or any other superfluous labels that lend themselves to a false sense of superiority. Please, respect one another, try to pass on accurate information, and keep your eye on the ball.
Reply With Quote
  #346  
Old 03-22-2011, 08:26 PM
Kyle's Avatar
Kyle Kyle is offline
MC Maniac
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Boat: 93 Prostar 190
Location: Fort Worth, TEXAS
Posts: 3,164
Quote:
Originally Posted by DemolitionMan View Post
Kyle is this what you used on your teak?
Any type of boiled linseed oil will work.
__________________
Rollin' Gangsta Style

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thrall View Post
"Heavy" beer is for wine drinkers that are too embarrassed to drink wine in front of their buddies. "Light" beer is a drinkin' man's beer!
Quote:
Originally Posted by thatsmrmastercraft View Post
If you want bling like the big dawgs, ya gotta lift your leg a little higher.....
Reply With Quote
  #347  
Old 03-22-2011, 10:23 PM
CardenFam's Avatar
CardenFam CardenFam is offline
TT Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Boat: 2006 red and white x2
Location: Greers Ferry, Arkansas
Posts: 126
Since we are on the topic of teak restoration I have a question myself. I have an 06 X2 that I am working on and I guess the PO had an issue with the platform. When I went to remove it this winter to store in my garage I had to unscrew the platform from the brackets because it was mounted to close to the boat and would hit the boat when I would lift up on it, making it unable to be removed as intended. My question is how much gap is there between the platform and the back of the boat?

And it does have the transom saver, I'm not sure if they all do or not.
__________________
IF YOU'RE NOT GRINNIN' THE MEAN ONES ARE WINNIN'
Reply With Quote
  #348  
Old 03-22-2011, 11:47 PM
east tx skier's Avatar
east tx skier east tx skier is offline
MC Hero
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Boat: 1998 Ski Nautique
Location: End of my rope.
Posts: 25,221
Quote:
Originally Posted by CardenFam View Post
Since we are on the topic of teak restoration I have a question myself. I have an 06 X2 that I am working on and I guess the PO had an issue with the platform. When I went to remove it this winter to store in my garage I had to unscrew the platform from the brackets because it was mounted to close to the boat and would hit the boat when I would lift up on it, making it unable to be removed as intended. My question is how much gap is there between the platform and the back of the boat?

And it does have the transom saver, I'm not sure if they all do or not.
Transom saver is an option.

There wasn't much of a gap on my 93. 1/4" tops.



__________________
Previous: 1993 Prostar 205

Red 1998 Closed Bow Ski Boat, Ford 351, 310 hp, Acme 4 blade, Perfect Pass SG.

FAQ


Tyler Ski Club


To me, this forum is about love of inboard boats. It is about the sharing of information and, on a good day, some humor. It is not about post count, brand of boat, or any other superfluous labels that lend themselves to a false sense of superiority. Please, respect one another, try to pass on accurate information, and keep your eye on the ball.
Reply With Quote
  #349  
Old 03-28-2011, 10:26 PM
wtrskr wtrskr is offline
TT Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Boat: '94 prostar 190
Location: Midwest
Posts: 253
I used Starbrite Tropical Teak Sealer to refinish my teak. I had done so because I had found an older thread that recommended Sealer. I'm happy with the results but have only gone through half a season so I'm not sure how it will be for the long run.

Everybody seems to being going with teak oil not teak sealer. I'd be curious to hear what others say about this choice? I've only done it this one way so I can't say whether you'd be better off with the sealer or oil.
Reply With Quote
  #350  
Old 03-29-2011, 08:10 AM
aquaman's Avatar
aquaman aquaman is online now
MC Fanatic
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Boat: 93 Barefoot 200 Yamaha 225F
Location: At the Helm
Posts: 884
Quote:
Originally Posted by wtrskr View Post
I used Starbrite Tropical Teak Sealer to refinish my teak. I had done so because I had found an older thread that recommended Sealer. I'm happy with the results but have only gone through half a season so I'm not sure how it will be for the long run.

Everybody seems to being going with teak oil not teak sealer. I'd be curious to hear what others say about this choice? I've only done it this one way so I can't say whether you'd be better off with the sealer or oil.
I have heard that the sealer does not allow the teak to breath and dry. Mold can then form on the damp teak....but under the sealer. Not pretty.

For ski platforms, teak does not need to be sealed.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:56 AM.