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  #191  
Old 03-07-2010, 07:46 AM
TMCNo1 TMCNo1 is offline
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Originally Posted by Jesus_Freak View Post
Looks excellent. Question: Seems like Harold's method (dont have time to find it now) includes dry sanding and eventually wet sanding after coats of oil are being applied. How do you keep from mucking up the sandpaper with oil? I tried to sand mine 3 weeks after the first coat "dried", and I cannot get through but about 4 seconds of sanding before my sheet is toast. What am I missing?
Having the sandpaper gumming up is a result of one of two things, one the oil is not dry enough and/or you need to wet sand using soapy water to allow the liquid to keep the sanding debris washed out of the sandpaper. The dry sanding should only be performed when the wood is dry and has not had any oil applied to it to be able to sand away the fuzzy raised fibers of the wood after the wood has dried and make it the last step other than taking a tac rag to it to remove the dust just before the first coat of oil is applied.
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  #192  
Old 03-07-2010, 08:20 AM
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bbymgr bbymgr is offline
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I had the same problem the first time a did #1's program. I bought a Wet Wedge to keep the paper fully wet and keep it from gumming up. Never had problems after that.

http://wetwedge.com/evanhorvath.htm
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  #193  
Old 03-07-2010, 08:24 AM
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Originally Posted by bbymgr View Post
I had the same problem the first time a did #1's program. I bought a Wet Wedge to keep the paper fully wet and keep it from gumming up. Never had problems after that.

http://wetwedge.com/evanhorvath.htm
Great product - I have never seen one of these before. I will definitely be ordering!
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  #194  
Old 03-07-2010, 08:30 AM
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Damn, 50 and sunny here today. Y'all gonna shame me into putting a coat on the platform today.
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  #195  
Old 03-07-2010, 09:59 AM
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Damn, 50 and sunny here today. Y'all gonna shame me into putting a coat on the platform today.
36 wiht rain forcasted for the week.
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  #196  
Old 03-07-2010, 10:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Jesus_Freak View Post
Looks excellent. Question: Seems like Harold's method (dont have time to find it now) includes dry sanding and eventually wet sanding after coats of oil are being applied. How do you keep from mucking up the sandpaper with oil? I tried to sand mine 3 weeks after the first coat "dried", and I cannot get through but about 4 seconds of sanding before my sheet is toast. What am I missing?
Use very thin coats of oil and plenty of water for lubrication. It is an exercise in repetition.
It does need to be 65f at a minimum.

You can make sure that the oil is dry enough and that you are using enough water by conducting a simple test. First, determnine the coefficient of friction of the sand paper across dry, oil free teak by calculating the amount of force required to pull the sanding block across a preset distance. Then, carefully spray water on the surface of the oil free teak and repeat the test. Now, apply oil in a sealed room at 80f with .05% humidity and let it dry for two months. Then, calculate the coefficient of friction without using water. Next divide the coefficient of friction of the sand paper across the dry teak oil by that of teak with no oil multiplied by 3.14 multiplied by the coefficient of friction when using water on teak without oil. If the result is within .0631% then the oil is dry enough and you are using enough water. Simple, really.
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  #197  
Old 03-07-2010, 10:36 AM
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  #198  
Old 03-07-2010, 10:49 AM
JJMorris3 JJMorris3 is offline
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I am surprised and excited about the results of oiling. Thanks for the advice Team Talk!
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  #199  
Old 03-08-2010, 01:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipper View Post
You can make sure that the oil is dry enough and that you are using enough water by conducting a simple test. First, determnine the coefficient of friction of the sand paper across dry, oil free teak by calculating the amount of force required to pull the sanding block across a preset distance. Then, carefully spray water on the surface of the oil free teak and repeat the test. Now, apply oil in a sealed room at 80f with .05% humidity and let it dry for two months. Then, calculate the coefficient of friction without using water. Next divide the coefficient of friction of the sand paper across the dry teak oil by that of teak with no oil multiplied by 3.14 multiplied by the coefficient of friction when using water on teak without oil. If the result is within .0631% then the oil is dry enough and you are using enough water. Simple, really.
What else did you think I was doing? Actually, you left out a few constants and a partial derivative, but I know what you mean.

Seriously, thank you all for the clarifications. I need to revise my methods...
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  #200  
Old 03-08-2010, 01:14 PM
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I got you brother....

I used this technique on my teak. Ran into the same problem. Once you wipe or brush on the teak oil, wipe off the excess after about 15 minutes. It doesn't all get absorbed by the wood. Then it will dry faster. You really need a lot of water. Keep it wet while you sand. Very time consuming. Takes a bunch of applications.
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