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  #1  
Old 10-25-2006, 10:07 AM
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Anti-freeze, winterization, etc.

Last year I didn't fully winterize the boat because I kept it in my heated garage (keep in mind I am in Georgia), well I moved this year and the old S&S will be stored in the barn at our farm up in North Georgia. The local boat guy is going to charge me $100 to drain the block and suck up the antifreeze, how hard can this be? Can anyone P.M. me some step by step directions for doing this, down to what hose from where type of thing. I really don't want to mess up the engine.
I am going to stable the fuel at the same time, but wait to change the oil and impellar till spring, is that wrong? And what is the deal with fogging? My boat guy said we don't have to fog in Georgia because it doesn't get too cold and the boat will only be winterized for 4 or 5 months.
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Old 10-25-2006, 10:19 AM
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Change the oil when you winterize. That way you won't have old oil with contaminates sitting in your pan all winter. Take the impeller out now as well but don't install the new one until the spring. As for fogging it has nothing to do with cold but everything to do with corrosion. A little humidity and condinsation can cause rust over time. Fogging is easy and I would do it for any long layup. Just get some fogging oil and spray it down the carb throat until it kills or almost kills.

Lots of info about doing the anti-freeze thing. Someone else will chime in on that. I don't live in an area that gets all that cold so all I do is drain the hoses, block and manifolds on the freezing nights.
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Last edited by BrianM; 10-25-2006 at 10:21 AM.
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  #3  
Old 10-25-2006, 10:28 AM
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Workin' 4 Toys Workin' 4 Toys is offline
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Do you know where all the drain plugs are on your engine?
How mechanically inclined are you?
Brian is right, change the oil now, pull the impeller and install the new in spring.
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Old 10-25-2006, 10:41 AM
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Cast iron can rust in a day if it gets wet and if the cold motor is exposed to warm air (like on a warm day after it has been cold), any exposed iron can get wet. There are usually a couple of valves that stay open when the motor is off and you really do want to fog it. The light coating of oil is cheap insurance against motor damage. I have been in GA- it can be a lot more humid than Wisconsin (where I am) and I wouldn't let a motor sit over the winter without it.

Old oil is corrosive and has moisture in it. For the low cost and the little time needed, an oil change is another thing I wouldn't put off until spring.
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Old 10-25-2006, 10:44 AM
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vogelm1 vogelm1 is offline
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Winterizing is not really all that hard, and I might be cautious what you're getting for a $100 job. Around here winterizing is twice that amount which is why many of us here do it ourselves. If you do a search on this site, you should find a checklist of things you need to do...basics are StaBil the fuel, change oil, lube steering cable, trailer bearings, and drain the engine block (adding anti-freeze is optional and seems that 50% of folks do it and 50% don't).

I would highly recommend changing the oil now, rather than have all that contaminated oil sitting in your engine all winter. Dirty engine oil has corrosives in it that eat your bearings, etc in a worst case scenario.
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Old 10-25-2006, 10:48 AM
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Winterizing is not really all that hard, and I might be cautious what you're getting for a $100 job. Around here winterizing is twice that amount which is why many of us here do it ourselves. If you do a search on this site, you should find a checklist of things you need to do...basics are StaBil the fuel, change oil, lube steering cable, trailer bearings, and drain the engine block (adding anti-freeze is optional and seems that 50% of folks do it and 50% don't). My owners manual for 2005 PS197 says just drain.

I would highly recommend changing the oil now, rather than have all that contaminated oil sitting in your engine all winter. Dirty engine oil has corrosives in it that eat your bearings, etc in a worst case scenario.
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Old 10-25-2006, 10:52 AM
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vogelm1 vogelm1 is offline
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Winterizing is not really all that hard, and I might be cautious what you're getting for a $100 job. Around here winterizing is twice that amount which is why many of us here do it ourselves. If you do a search on this site, you should find a checklist of things you need to do...basics are StaBil the fuel, change oil, lube steering cable, trailer bearings, and drain the engine block (adding anti-freeze is optional and seems that 50% of folks do it and 50% don't). My owners manual for 2005 PS197 says just drain.

I would highly recommend changing the oil now, rather than have all that contaminated oil sitting in your engine all winter. Dirty engine oil has corrosives in it that eat your bearings, etc in a worst case scenario. Fogging the engine involves spraying "fogging oil" directly into the intake (carb or throttle body) while it's running, until white smoke appears at the exhaust, OR the motor stumbles and quits on it's own. The fogging oil coats the insides of the of the cylinders, and head preventing corrosion.
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  #8  
Old 10-25-2006, 12:23 PM
TRBenj TRBenj is offline
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Good advice so far. Winterizing is very easy, and doesnt take very long at all. All that is involved is:

1. add stabilizer to the fuel tank
2. warm up motor
3. fog motor
4. drain water
5. change motor oil and tranny fluid
6. fill motor with antifreeze

I believe on all PCM's there are 3 drains on the motor- 1 on each side and one between the thermostat housing and circulation pump. Drain the manifolds (1 plug on the rear of each). Make sure the tranny cooler is empty. Empty the strainer if you have one. Also blow the water out of the heater core and shower lines (if applicable).

I remove my RWP and store it inside for the winter- but thats not required. It does make it easier to fill the block with antifreeze, though. I pour the A/F into the hoses that connect to the RWP until it wont take any more. 2 gallons (mixed) should be enough, but it wouldnt hurt to keep 3 on hand.
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Old 10-25-2006, 03:34 PM
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I would change the order to:
1. add stabilizer to the fuel tank
2. warm up motor
3. change motor oil and tranny fluid
4. run motor to get fresh oil into the small spaces
5. drain water
6. Run motor on anti-freeze only and fog while still running

If filling from the top down, just fog it but pull the block plugs to make sure the anti-freeze got in where is should. Filling it through the raw water hose using gravity doesn't get it past the thermostat.
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Old 10-25-2006, 04:28 PM
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Mmo

I think in easties checklist it mentions Marvel Mystery oil. Anyone familiar with this stuff. I have found it everywhere I go, but it doesn't say anything about using it for fogging an engine. The label reads like it is more of an oil additive. Anyone use it for fogging? Thanks in advance
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