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Old 10-26-2016, 03:02 PM
brokenanew brokenanew is offline
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Boat: 1988 Mastercraft Tristar 190 351Ford
Location: Arkansas
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88 Tristar restore project some pics

Ok so here's a picture of the boat and few current projects.
Right now I have the shaft out, replacing the stuffing box hose, packing, exhaust hose, re glass the muffler etc.

1) My current project this weekend is to clean the fuel pick up valve. IS that in one of these pics?

Finally after reading enough, I will be redoing the bow eye. The backing place had crushed and pulled in the fiberglass. Turns out there was wood in that cavity and it was rotten completely. SO I cut open the cavity as you can see, pulled out all the rotten pieces. I will clean with acetone and give me your thoughts on this:
I'm using epoxy with some thickener and chopped fiberglass to fill that cavity where the wood was. Then Ill put the backing plate back.
2) HERES MY QUESTION: I'm going to get the epoxy to a near peanut butter consistency, HOW THICK can I lay each layer on (It will be 70-85 degrees this weekend) 1/8"? And its a medium set, how do I know when to put the next layer on to maximum hold and adherence? When its tacky? Just don't want to cause a fire.
3) And next. That middle piece of flooring (Notice Im trying to pull the carpet out)m how do I get that thing out?! I can move the pole, but the seating frame IS PART OF THE HOLE BOAT/HULL. I'm going to have to repair or replace it because its cracked and gives way to weight. I may just fiberglass wood underneath it to strengthen it.

All help is appreciated! Thanks!
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Old 10-26-2016, 11:47 PM
MikeyOrange88 MikeyOrange88 is offline
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Boat: 1988 Tristar 190 Sport (Closed Bow), 351W w/ GT-40's
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1 Yes, third photo, the square aluminum block that the hose is connected to is the pickup tube. There is a check ball inside the aluminum fitting (it unscrews from tank), make sure it isn't gummed up. Also, a screen in the bottom of the tube can collect stuff. The other item in the top there is the fuel gauge, probably just leave that one alone.

3) The center piece of floor will come out, but it takes some coercion and prying. The pylon will have to come out as well as the drivers seat and base. It has been awhile since I did my carpet, but the panel will come out. Cant remember exactly how I did it, but you can try pushing it all the wall forward (it might help since you have the bow eye out of the way too) and then lift the back up and try to pull it back thru the seat back opening. If that doesn't work, it will have to come out on the drivers side. Dang memory thing, sucks getting old. Mine panel had cracks between the access hole and the pylon hole. I just added some fiberglass to the bottom.

Boat looks very familiar, mine is the same model, year, and color.
Good luck with your efforts.
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Old 10-27-2016, 02:45 AM
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wheelerd wheelerd is offline
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All the floor pieces will come out . . . eventually. I did the complete carpet on mine. To get the walkway piece out you need to jack up both sides of the dash. There is a thread on TT somewhere about this.
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Old 10-27-2016, 05:46 PM
brokenanew brokenanew is offline
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Boat: 1988 Mastercraft Tristar 190 351Ford
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Thanks for the input. I didnt think about pushing the panel TOWARDS thebow. Ill try that. Do you think its safe to put the epoxy on 1/8" thick at a time?
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Old 12-19-2016, 06:52 PM
brokenanew brokenanew is offline
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Ok so my health has gone to crap. Ive had surgery so between the financial blow and slowing down. I havent gotten as much done as Id hoped.
The pics show me filling in tge void where THERE WAS completely rotted wood.
Then I put a layer of fiberglass over it the bondo. Then bondoed the backing plate to be sure its even.
Its stout. Not super pretty. But very strong.

Tge fiberglass piece of middle flooring where the pylon was at was toast. It was beyond saving. So Im replacing with marine grade 3/4 plywood. Ill insert that back in as I replace all the carpet.

Replaced the exhaust hosing as the were bubbled up on the inside.

Had a machine shop check shaft. Its perfect. Replaced packing and stuffing box hose.
Waiting for new cutlass bearings.

New blower. New switch panels. Still working on installing those switches. 15 a pop! Anyone know where to get the cheap? Ill putup more pictures when I can
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Old 12-19-2016, 07:15 PM
waterlogged882 waterlogged882 is offline
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I hope you are better in health and prosperity as well. Good to see you back in action.

Your work looks good. The bondo is OK for that work in particular with a layer of epoxy under it. You asked in an earlier post about the thickness of medium cure epoxy...realizing that the work is completed, I will say FYI that you could have laid in the entire thickness to match the hull with no problems of heat. The medium cure epoxy typically heats up (significantly) in a very confined or small volume space. I'd have laid that in in one shot.

Your work still looks great and I like the bondo due to the ease of workability and sanding if were needed.

Best luck with your progress. I'm working on finishing a 1981 restoration and have been down most of the issue roads as such so I know how it can be to stumble upon an unanticipated issue.

.
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Old 12-19-2016, 07:40 PM
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wheelerd wheelerd is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brokenanew View Post
.

Tge fiberglass piece of middle flooring where the pylon was at was toast. It was beyond saving. So Im replacing with marine grade 3/4 plywood. Ill insert that back in as I replace all the carpet.
Looks good.
For that center floor section, cover it all the way around with fibreglass matting and then spread resin. That will seal the wood. I did that on my 91 Tristar.
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Old 12-19-2016, 07:50 PM
waterlogged882 waterlogged882 is offline
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Not to contradict the advice of the previous poster but I will say this...as a matter of preference and best results for me...If you are just looking to seal the wood, I would not recommend cloth at all. It serves no purpose. If you want a stiff floor, cloth may work to some degree (??). However 3/4" compressed marine grade wood should be pretty stiff. The best bet all around is to lay in an under-floor support between the stringers if there is room under the floor (fuel cell).

If you choose to cloth the floor piece I would do this: wet your cloth first then lay it in. Wetting dry cloth with a brush, in place, is not the best way to get the cloth in place without ravels and runs to the cloth. Just my preference but I've tried it all..

Get a cheap aluminum rectangle pie pan from the Dollar Store and cut the cloth in manageable strips or swaths as you prefer (consider how much epoxy you want to mix and its pot life). Lay the cloth in the pan (multi-layer if necessary), mix the resin and hardener then pour the epoxy onto the cloth at the different layers. Use a cheap (Harbor Freight - 12 - 3" chip brushes for $8.00) chip brush to spread the epoxy across the cloth and wet it completely. Leave the cloth in the pan, take the pan to the floor then transfer the cloth onto the area. Use the brush as a spatula to put the cloth in place. Use as little as only necessary. Get a roller (for cloth and epoxy) and roll out any air bubbles or wrinkles, which is typically not an issue on a flat surface but have one on hand anyway. Nine ounces of epoxy resin will wet out about 270 in sq. or a 9" wide x 30" long- biaxial 12 oz. cloth. Any more resin than that and you risk the mixture popping on you before you get it laid in.

If you have a sprayer that is an entire different approach. I'd love to have one

Your call but dry cloth is really hard to manage and wet while in place where you want it to land (compared to the other wetting method).

I use cloth for structural integrity. Sealing wood can be done with an epoxy resin and hardener mixture. Do not be tempted to use the less expensive poly-resin. It is not waterproof.

None of these recommendations in this post are right or wrong...just my experience over the last few months of working with a restoration project.

Here are two pieces I sealed just last week. Make sure and wipe the under-edges for drips before they cure. Much less sanding for the finished product as the floor goes down. I mixed 12 (total ounces - 2:1 mix) in a 20 oz. red plastic cup (re-usable for another batch) and then poured it out on the surface(s), thus extending the pot life exponentially over being kept in the container. Brush it out a little at a time. You're on the right track and find what works best for you.

.
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Last edited by waterlogged882; 12-19-2016 at 09:42 PM.
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Old 01-18-2017, 01:09 PM
brokenanew brokenanew is offline
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Thanks for the input fellas. Due to it being ridiculously cold, Ive held off on some work. I think I might forgo the cloth and just put a good layer of resin on the plywood. Ive already got it cut exactly to match the piece I pulled out.

Thanks for the how-to, Waterlogged. I figured I could have gotten away with laying teh bow eye epoxy in one go after I did the first. I think I did it in 3 batches, sanding between each batch. Either way, it is definitely solid. I used 5200 sealant on the holes of the bow eye as well.

Ive still got to replace the cutlass bearing and install/ align the shaft. Anyone know of any tutorials for shaft alignment?

Ive also got to re glass one of the mufflers. Already did one and replaced the hosing. Need to do the other. On top of the need to replace the carpet as well. So much work to do before the next season comes around.

Less expensive epoxy?
Ive used Total Boat and seems to do well. Ive heard some other positive performance reviews on the epoxy. Whats your thought?
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Old 01-27-2017, 12:32 AM
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gr82bgreen gr82bgreen is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waterlogged882 View Post
Not to contradict the advice of the previous poster but I will say this...as a matter of preference and best results for me...If you are just looking to seal the wood, I would not recommend cloth at all. It serves no purpose. If you want a stiff floor, cloth may work to some degree (??). However 3/4" compressed marine grade wood should be pretty stiff. The best bet all around is to lay in an under-floor support between the stringers if there is room under the floor (fuel cell).

If you choose to cloth the floor piece I would do this: wet your cloth first then lay it in. Wetting dry cloth with a brush, in place, is not the best way to get the cloth in place without ravels and runs to the cloth. Just my preference but I've tried it all..

Get a cheap aluminum rectangle pie pan from the Dollar Store and cut the cloth in manageable strips or swaths as you prefer (consider how much epoxy you want to mix and its pot life). Lay the cloth in the pan (multi-layer if necessary), mix the resin and hardener then pour the epoxy onto the cloth at the different layers. Use a cheap (Harbor Freight - 12 - 3" chip brushes for $8.00) chip brush to spread the epoxy across the cloth and wet it completely. Leave the cloth in the pan, take the pan to the floor then transfer the cloth onto the area. Use the brush as a spatula to put the cloth in place. Use as little as only necessary. Get a roller (for cloth and epoxy) and roll out any air bubbles or wrinkles, which is typically not an issue on a flat surface but have one on hand anyway. Nine ounces of epoxy resin will wet out about 270 in sq. or a 9" wide x 30" long- biaxial 12 oz. cloth. Any more resin than that and you risk the mixture popping on you before you get it laid in.

If you have a sprayer that is an entire different approach. I'd love to have one

Your call but dry cloth is really hard to manage and wet while in place where you want it to land (compared to the other wetting method).

I use cloth for structural integrity. Sealing wood can be done with an epoxy resin and hardener mixture. Do not be tempted to use the less expensive poly-resin. It is not waterproof.

None of these recommendations in this post are right or wrong...just my experience over the last few months of working with a restoration project.

Here are two pieces I sealed just last week. Make sure and wipe the under-edges for drips before they cure. Much less sanding for the finished product as the floor goes down. I mixed 12 (total ounces - 2:1 mix) in a 20 oz. red plastic cup (re-usable for another batch) and then poured it out on the surface(s), thus extending the pot life exponentially over being kept in the container. Brush it out a little at a time. You're on the right track and find what works best for you.

.
If you just want to seal the wood and not use cloth what product would you use?
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