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  #91  
Old 07-24-2018, 06:06 PM
06SUPERDUTY 06SUPERDUTY is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2016
Boat: 1989 Mastercraft Prostar 190
Location: Northwest
Posts: 73
We have a 1989 Prostar 190 with the factory trailer, I can't winch ours on either, I have found that if you back in till the bumper of our pickup is at the waters edge and drive the boat on as far as it will go without too much throttle and then get out of the boat and have the driver back the trailer back till the rear tires are in the water you can pretty much float the boat on enough to hook it up, some times you have to pull a little by hand or back the trailer a little more. We don't have a strait shot at loading so by doing this the boat seems to center better and you don't have to worry as much about hitting the prop on the trailer like you would by backing all the way in all at once. Ours always takes a hard left when it hits the bunks so this way works best at our boat ramp, it was a little iffy till we figured this out.
Good luck,
Randy
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  #92  
Old 07-24-2018, 06:58 PM
waterlogged882 waterlogged882 is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2004
Boat: 93 190
Location: lake
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jieiku View Post
Will keep that in mind and give it a try next trip down to the lake, Thanks!
These particular trailers are not meant (by design and intent) to be winched. They require drive off / drive on.

Easy peasy to load. There is a particular method. I have used these trailers for years and can get a boat loaded and cinched at the bow in less than a minute. Driver of the automobile pulls away. Takes me two minutes if I gave to get out and drive myself.

Randy...no cigar... You are working way too hard.

Floating the boat is nothing but issues awaiting at the v-bunk or the bump pad as you drag the bow eyelet across the bunk. The more the float, the higher the rear (relative to the trailer) / the lower the bow and drags across the bunk or the pad.

Each to their own but winching is the last thing you want to do for ease of loading.

.
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Last edited by waterlogged882; 07-24-2018 at 07:12 PM.
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  #93  
Old 07-24-2018, 07:47 PM
jieiku jieiku is offline
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Join Date: May 2017
Boat: 1986 Mastercraft Skier P-S 351w
Location: Pacific Northwest
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waterlogged882, How deep in the water are you putting your trailer when you drive the boat onto it? and is just idling enough speed to load?
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  #94  
Old 07-24-2018, 07:58 PM
waterlogged882 waterlogged882 is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2004
Boat: 93 190
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Originally Posted by jieiku View Post
waterlogged882, How deep in the water are you putting your trailer when you drive the boat onto it? and is just idling enough speed to load?
With these trailers (the 19 Skier model) I back in to about 3/4 - 7/8 to the top of the fender... and the same on the next generation of the Prostar 190 (mine currently is a 93). But the trick is getting the boat on and the safety bar attached in a single motion. Easy peasy. There are always considerations of the ramp but mostly speaking as I stated.

I approach the trailer at an idle and let the nose (keel) of the boat settle in on the bunks. Just idle the boat right up onto the bunks and stop for a second or two...let the boat settle. With a nudge of the throttle it will settle onto the bunks and also be ready for forward motion with the throttle. Bump it in gear and get the keel on the roller (a distinct change in feel). Then throttle up to get the keel into the v-bunk or on the bump pad.....however here is the trick; load the boat (bow/keel) beyond the point of attaching the bar. Actually over-shoot that target and run the boat up on the trailer a little too far (but not through the back of the vehicle ).

Leave the throttle in position as the boat will hold right there (do not leave the driver's seat if a pet is onboard to jump on the throttle lever). Get out on the deck and lay down to pick up the bar. As you lift the bar, wiggle your body enough to make the boat shift backwards and off the bunk. As it does, slip the safety bar onto the bow eye. Clip it off with the winch hook, back over the windshield and shut it down. Done deal.

With two people loading, you never have to cross the windshield. That second person is maneuvering the bar as you overshoot and then back off the throttle to slide back. Be cautious of any and all pinch points.

If you don't get far enough on the first shot, back off to the initial starting point and go forward in a smooth and easy (but persuasive) motion.

May sound ridiculous but it is a fail-proof method in just a few tries to discover your own sweet-spot preferences.

Been doing it that way for 39 years. The Boat Buddy on my 93 is also a handy gadget. I load it the very same way and merely bump the trip mechanism and it snaps shut. Done deal.

Unloading is about the same method and varies a tiny bit with one person solo or a second person driving the vehicle. Note: drop your bar before you get in the water. Same depth and back it off. Hammer on it if necessary (within reason). Too deep and the bow eye drags. Too shallow and the boat doesn't come off easy. Find your sweet spot and make it easy work. With a second person launching..... same trailer depth. Back off a little (maybe a foot...enough to clear the bow eye of the bunk), then the driver should back in deeper to float the boat (now clear of the bow eye dragging). Another easy method.

.

.
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Last edited by waterlogged882; 07-24-2018 at 08:45 PM.
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  #95  
Old 07-24-2018, 11:45 PM
jieiku jieiku is offline
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Join Date: May 2017
Boat: 1986 Mastercraft Skier P-S 351w
Location: Pacific Northwest
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Thank you everyone! I appreciate all the responses.

waterlogged882, I am going to try that method next time I am down at the lake, I will have second person with me so I wont even have to cross the windshield.
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  #96  
Old 07-25-2018, 09:42 AM
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tjrowbot tjrowbot is offline
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Boat: 2000 X5
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Great thread and great work! I just spent 25 minutes of "work" time reading the thread. Nice to see the dedication to your restoration and help of the good people on this site. Now the real fun starts... Maintenance!
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  #97  
Old 07-26-2018, 06:33 PM
jieiku jieiku is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 06SUPERDUTY View Post
We have a 1989 Prostar 190 with the factory trailer, I can't winch ours on either, I have found that if you back in till the bumper of our pickup is at the waters edge and drive the boat on as far as it will go without too much throttle and then get out of the boat and have the driver back the trailer back till the rear tires are in the water you can pretty much float the boat on enough to hook it up, some times you have to pull a little by hand or back the trailer a little more. We don't have a strait shot at loading so by doing this the boat seems to center better and you don't have to worry as much about hitting the prop on the trailer like you would by backing all the way in all at once. Ours always takes a hard left when it hits the bunks so this way works best at our boat ramp, it was a little iffy till we figured this out.
Good luck,
Randy
Randy, Just wanted to post saying thank you, because this method absolutely works if your at a lake where no motors are allowed, your boat is broken down, or you just dont want to power load.

So my boat was sitting waaaaaaay to far back a good 9" or so. I really didnt feel comfortable driving down the highway with it like this cause the boat being that far back made the trailer badly off balance.

So I took the boat to my local fishing lake (just around the corner from my house) and so I didnt have to go faster than 15 MPH. This lake dont allow power motors, electric only. So I tried your method and back the boat into the water until just before the back bumper of my full length bed touched the water.

I was able to then just grab the front of the boat and pull it forward and hookup the safety bar, clamp it with the winch and drive slowly out of the water, now my boat is sitting correctly on the trailer again!

Next time I am down at the big lake I will try out waterlogged882's method.
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