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  #11  
Old 09-17-2018, 01:57 PM
jkski jkski is offline
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Sticking with the simple things approach.....
Is the engine turning over at all/trying to fire or is a case of you turn the key and nothing (not even a click)?

If it is the later of the 2 it very well could be a neutral safety switch of sorts. If so, try wiggling the throttle back and forth and then hit the key. Most boats act completely dead when the throttle is not in exact neutral.
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  #12  
Old 09-18-2018, 01:03 AM
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Quote:
If you have the Ignitor electronic ignition I don't know which electronic ignition I have, you probably have the ballast resistor still connected unless you have the Flamethrower coil with the resistor built in. I have a new FT coil, does that mean it has the built-in resistor?

You should have battery voltage to the coil, or ballast resistor if used with the key on/engine off, and while cranking or running. I only have 10 volts

Pertronix ignitions have internal circuit protection which won't allow spark below a certain voltage (I think 10.5 volts). You can disconnect the power wire to the coil and temporarily use a jumper wire direct from the battery.
So why is there only 10 volts at the coil?
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  #13  
Old 09-18-2018, 02:43 AM
FrankSchwab FrankSchwab is offline
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Weak battery, corrosion on the connectors between the battery and the coil, etc. It's kinda weird, but the battery power goes to the helm, through the ignition switch, and back to the coil - it's a long way with a lot of connections to go bad. The coil pulls a significant amount of current, so a high-resistance connection will drop significant voltage.
It's also possible the coil shorted out, which would pull a lot more current through the wiring, causing a lower voltage reading.

What voltage do you read when you measure across the battery posts?
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  #14  
Old 09-18-2018, 08:06 AM
88 PS190 88 PS190 is offline
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I know you did the ignition switch but suspect it again. Loose connection at switch or bad switch.
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  #15  
Old 09-18-2018, 09:22 AM
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Check the voltage on the battery posts, then repeat it by putting the leads on the battery terminals. If you see a difference, clean and tighten the cable ends and terminals.

If you don't see spark on the plug wires, put the clamp on the wire from the coil to the distributor cap- if you don't see spark, check the inside of the cap and look at the rotor- rotors sometimes break and if it does, it won't work.

Measure voltage at the starter, using the engine block ground point (it's where the battery - cable is bolted on. Once you check this, move the meter's negative lead to the battery - post (not the cable end) to measure voltage- if you see a difference, find out why.
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  #16  
Old 09-18-2018, 09:57 AM
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All of the above is good advice. I'll get working on it, and let you know if I find something. Thanks!
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  #17  
Old 09-18-2018, 07:53 PM
waterlogged882 waterlogged882 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Miss Rita View Post
So why is there only 10 volts at the coil?
1) I don't know which electronic ignition I have,
2) I only have 10 volts
3) Where would l look for the neutral safety switch?
4) The engine cranks and turns over just fine, but doesn't start
1) The manufacturer's recommendations and guidance for tolerances on their specs say that 10V is within tolerance of good operation.

2)Your 92 came with OEM EI, no external resistor, thus eliminate that variable out of the equation.

Your OEM EI

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You should have a screw-down distributor cap. Therefore you need these (below) parts (from Summit).

Check the advance springs in the basement of the distributor housing.

3) 10v output is within specs.

4) If you need to jump-check in the future, the two wires are on the neutral safety switch mounted on the transmission. And easy find-test-fix. If your engine turns, you have a complete circuit on your neutral safety. Remove that variable from the equation.

Neutral Safety Module
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I replaced a 93 OEM EI earlier this year (see the below photograph) with these new parts. My OEM was weak compared to the new EI.

New EI Install
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I also replaced the OEM coil with the FT-II/0.06ohm to compliment. New rotor button, new spark plug wires (do not use solid core wires).

FT-II / resistor core wires

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Not sure how this thread took such a turn from problem analysis and trouble shoot to replacement parts but it happens.
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Last edited by waterlogged882; 09-19-2018 at 09:02 PM.
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  #18  
Old 09-18-2018, 11:34 PM
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I always think its a good idea to keep a spare spark plug in the onboard tool box. that way if you suspect a no spark condition you can check it by just pulling a plug wire and attaching to spare and grounding to block while someone cranks... a lot faster and simpler than pulling a spark plug to perform spark test.
and someone, (maybe it was you rita?), had a faulty ignition switch but in their case it provided power to spark plugs when engine cranked but not in the run position... though then engine would crank, then catch/fire, then die in the run position. sounds like yours is not even trying. I suspect no spark. keep us posted. -j
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  #19  
Old 09-19-2018, 12:26 AM
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waterlogged, you have once again gone above and beyond. Thanks!

jayR: Yes I replaced the ignition switch one week ago. The engine does crank, and there are 10 volts at the coil, so it appears that part of the circuit is OK. It looks like something is wrong with the distributor or the electronic ignition?

Last edited by Miss Rita; 09-19-2018 at 08:52 PM.
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  #20  
Old 09-19-2018, 06:58 PM
waterlogged882 waterlogged882 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Miss Rita View Post
waterlogged, you have once gone above and beyond. Thanks!

jayR: Yes I replaced the ignition switch one week ago. The engine does crank, and there are 10 volts at the coil, so it appears that part of the circuit is OK. It looks like something is wrong with the distributor or the electronic ignition?
I think I can find my OEM EI if you need it to test and not in a hurry (USPS). Be glad to send it out to you. No need to send it back. No charge.
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