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  #21  
Old 09-09-2013, 02:16 PM
chriscraftmatt1976
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Originally Posted by TRBenj View Post
Shimming the strut with washers is a absolutely an acceptable repair. Taking a belt sander or grinder to the strut base to tweak the angle slightly is perfectly acceptable as well. I have seen struts vary significantly from casting to casting. Buying a new strut is no guarantee that you wont be back asking this very question after spending $400+.

I would remove the shaft log hose and see how close you are to being centered in the log with the strut as-is. If its off a good distance, then adjust the strut until youre centered. If youre already centered, then there is an issue with the mounting location of the powertrain and I would not attempt moving the strut to accommodate that.
Hmm. For your boat, not mine. Imo.
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  #22  
Old 09-10-2013, 05:36 AM
Mark rsa2au's Avatar
Mark rsa2au Mark rsa2au is offline
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I called the 2 main prop and strut repair companies in Melbourne for their opinion / quote to correct the angle of the strut. Both dismissed the repair and told be to use large stainless washers as a shim on the rear of the strut, and then to make sure enough silicone is used to prevent water getting behind the strut.
Seeing as the angle change only needs to be about 1 or 2 degrees I may even have to sand the washers down for a lower profile.

I asked both if they see this as risky and both said that it is done all the time with no issues. There is no thrust on the strut, and if alighned correctly there should be very little vibration or movement on the strut either. It does however need to guide a propshaft with 300hp on the other end so make sure it is done up tight. I was told to ensure the bearing was good and it is cause it is brand new, and to make certain that the engine - propshaft alighnment was as per boat spec.

I know some of the purists do not see this as acceptable, but I am willing to give it a go. (seems I am not infected by MCOCD....yet)

Will let you know how it goes.
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  #23  
Old 09-10-2013, 10:13 AM
TRBenj TRBenj is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chriscraftmatt1976 View Post
Hmm. For your boat, not mine. Imo.
This is common industry practice- certainly in terms of repair, and there are many inboard manufacturers that shim, or have shimmed struts to align them from the factory. Top tier ski boat manufacturers included. Heck, your boat may already have washers under the strut and you wouldnt know it!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark rsa2au View Post
I asked both if they see this as risky and both said that it is done all the time with no issues. There is no thrust on the strut, and if alighned correctly there should be very little vibration or movement on the strut either. It does however need to guide a propshaft with 300hp on the other end so make sure it is done up tight. I was told to ensure the bearing was good and it is cause it is brand new, and to make certain that the engine - propshaft alighnment was as per boat spec.
100% true. I prefer to grind my strut bases flat instead of shimming, but doing so is still a perfectly acceptable, common practice, for the exact reasons stated above.
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  #24  
Old 09-10-2013, 10:34 AM
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agua4fun agua4fun is offline
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Mark, I did something similar, i used washers like your plan - and then made a shim to fill the space under the strut with epoxy/glass. The shim wasn't adhered with the epoxy to anything, just a shim, then i used 3M 4200 on both sides. I ran it that way for 6 months here and it worked great. Last week I hit a log under water, bent the strut more..... I ended up finding a local shop that fixed it for $95 and i removed the shim. If i was to do it over again i would have just had it fixed the first time and no shim, but if your repair cost is really that much - i wouldnt blame you to try - id just keep an eye under there for any stress cracks. Even so, i think it will work just fine. Let us know
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  #25  
Old 10-10-2013, 05:51 AM
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Mark rsa2au Mark rsa2au is offline
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Pulled strut, prop and shaft this week.
Used aluminium plate 1mm thick and cut 25mm wide to fit across the rear 2 bolt holes to use as a shim. Used 2 plates in the rear most bolt holes, and one plate in the second row as a step down. Used silicone sealant on all sides, including inside the holes and arround the outer edge of the strut.

The 2mm shim lifted the shaft about 12mm at the coupler end. then spent a LONG time getting the coupling flange to line up perfectly.. and I mean perfectly. The lowest measurment on my guage is 0.01mm (0.004 of an inch) and it was unable to find any gap all around the flange. Should be vibration free now....

With new cutlas bearing I can easily turn the prop with one hand..
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  #26  
Old 10-10-2013, 09:20 AM
TRBenj TRBenj is offline
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Sounds like a job well done except for the silicone. Thats really not an appropriate below waterline sealant. 3M 5200 and 4200 are commonly recommended, I would say something like Life Boat caulk at a minimum. I think Sika makes something comparable if 3m stuff isnt readily available down under.
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  #27  
Old 10-10-2013, 09:43 AM
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Mark rsa2au Mark rsa2au is offline
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Yep used the Sika marine grade silicone sealant. I have done this a few times this winter so far so to pull it out and redo should the silicon not be up to it, will be simple.
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  #28  
Old 10-10-2013, 11:39 AM
TRBenj TRBenj is offline
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I think we are having a communication issue... I believe the Sika/Sikaflex below waterline sealants are moisture cure polyurethanes like the 4200/5200. I think youre using the "silicone" nomenclature generically (might be an Aussie thing?). Sika does make some silicone caulking products for other industries, hopefully that is not what you used.
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