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Old 05-14-2017, 12:50 PM
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Steve-O-Reeno Steve-O-Reeno is offline
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Oil analysis shows a lot of metal

Just had an oil analysis done by Blackstone Labs. The results were such that they actually called before completing and sending the full report. It appears as though the iron content in the sample is north of 340ppm and the silicone content is high as well. I expect to have the full report next week and will get with my mechanic to get his opinion and recommendation. But it is the weekend and I can't wait so I am posting here to see what my fellow TT Members might have to offer. I should mention that I had the heads replaced 50 hours ago and this is sample is from the first oil change after that. As always any input would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 05-14-2017, 04:06 PM
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Keith2230 Keith2230 is offline
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I'm not an expert by any means on this but it's my understanding to expect some wear with new rings. I'm hoping for your sake the more knowledgeable ones will chime in with a that's normal response.
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Old 05-14-2017, 08:13 PM
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Generally there are 3 places that comes from.

1) Main and Rod Bearings
2) Cam and Cam Bearings
3) Cylinder Walls
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Old 05-15-2017, 09:29 AM
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1. METALS ANALYSIS
Spectroscopy identifies the amount and type of wear metals, additives, contamination in both new and used lubricating oil. By determining the metal content can able to alert the severity and type of problem occurring in the equipment compartment. Spectrometric analysis can detect metals up to a maximum of 8 microns in size. All measurements are made in parts per million (ppm).Based on the extensive knowledge of both lubricants and equipment, the serviceability of the oil can be analyzed by interpreting the source of each metals.

A.WEAR METALS

The primary goal in doing an oil analysis is to identify the wear metals. Frictional wear occurs during the relative motion between lubricated surfaces, despite the fact that these surfaces are usually coated with an oil film. Metals that are identified are:

Lead – Usually a soft metal, most common related to bushings and Rod Bearings. Engine oil which are highly oxidized can attack the bearing material, leads to increased lead readings.
Iron – Mostly comes from Cylinder liners, Rings, Crankshaft, Camshaft, Rods, Valve Train, Oil pump gear, Wrist pins, cast iron components and Gears. Usually found as fine particles due to abrasion or wear.
Aluminium –Generally comes from Pistons, Turbo Bearings, Main and Rod Bearings, pumps, thrust bearings and washers, plates and Aluminium castings. Aluminium associated with silica indicates dirt. Aluminium found in hydraulic system should be generally due to dirt ingestion and in final drives can be associated with dirt or sand.
Copper – Usually like a soft metal present in Main and Rod Bearings, Oil Cooler core, Clutch plates, Brass and Bronze bushings and Roller bearing outer cage. In engines it should be due to the water pump leak or coolant core. If it is found along with potassium, sodium and glycol, it will be coming from the oil cooler. If it is found along with lead and tin, it will be coming from bearing or bushing.
Chromium – Generally a hard metal generated from piston rings, Liners, Exhaust Valves, Shaft plating, Roller bearings, needle bearings, shafts, rods, gears, stainless steel alloys. Its presence indicates something harder is present usually silica and alumina. Chromium found in hydraulic system is from cylinder rods and valve spools.
Tin – Usually found in Bearings, Brass or Bronze Bushings and Flashing from pistons. Tin associated with lead and copper in engines indicate bearing wear.
Nickel – Alloy Valves, Crankshafts, Camshafts, Bearings and shafts.
These are probably the most common metals found in Engines, Transmissions, Hydraulic Systems and Gear Systems.

B.CONTAMINANTS

Silicon
Silicon may indicate either dirt contamination in the oil sample or ingestion of dirt/dust in the engine inlet system. Another source can come from excessive use of Silicone containing sealants to seal certain parts of the engine or gearbox. High levels of Silicone can result in oil foaming and lubricating quality loss and heat transfer capabilities. A foam test on the used oil may be needed if Silicone contamination is suspected. Its presence in new engines indicates liquid silicon sealant used while assembly and usually gets washed away with the first oil change.

Sodium
Sodium associated with boron and potassium confirms glycol contamination. Usually found as a coolant or chemical inhibitors.
Potassium
Usually found in coolant formulations and no longer an additive for engine oils. Its presence with sodium indicates coolant contamination.
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Old 05-15-2017, 01:30 PM
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I wouldn't take the content from the first oil change after major work seriously. Also, I don't run oil that long after major engine work.
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Old 05-15-2017, 05:02 PM
curver900 curver900 is offline
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^^^ +1 5 hours at most then change it then change again at 10 hours then start your normal changing cycle... 50 hours is to long but you can't change that now... so change it then run it for 10 hours and send that sample in...
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Old 05-15-2017, 05:13 PM
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Steve-O-Reeno Steve-O-Reeno is offline
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Thanks for the input. That is pretty much what I was planning on doing. I will post results when I get them. Thanks again!
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  #8  
Old 05-15-2017, 05:28 PM
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I have always thought 50 hours was the changing cycle I was supposed to follow is that not correct and if not couldn't I change it? I should mention the boat runs really great and sounds good and all that and I will do anything and everything I need to keep it that way!
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Old 05-15-2017, 09:26 PM
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50 hours sounds great on an established engine
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  #10  
Old 05-16-2017, 06:25 AM
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If you replaced the heads with new, the silicon could be from sand from the casting getting stuck inside during mfg. it could also be from any silicon gasket sealer they used like for the timing chain cover, etc. Post up the full report if you want. Also, I would not start tearing it down just yet but would change the oil and filter and run it again for s short while and retest.
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