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  #21  
Old 03-13-2016, 11:00 PM
Showmaker Showmaker is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2016
Boat: 1995 Mastercraft Prostar 190
Location: Rocky Mountain States
Posts: 12
Refurbishing the teak deck

Let me start by saying this has been the hardest project we have done...We started sanding the deck with a 60 grit using our Makita sander/polisher. This was our first mistake, even on a 1 setting the sander put swirls into the wood. We ditched the Makita and started hand sanding. There wasn't a lot of old oil on the deck but lots of black grime, especially in between the slots and on the sides of the deck! All the kids helped with this project, which was really fun. We then moved onto sanding with 100 grit. This made the swirls lighten up, but they were still noticeable. I didn't have any higher grit sandpaper and decided to be finished with the sanding. We then moved into oiling the teak with Starbrite Premium Golden Teak Oil and a shop rag. We rubbed a small amount of oil in the direction of the grain using the shop rag. After approximately 5 minutes we rubbed off any excess oil with a clean shop rag. The deck looks better but we have decided to go back and and re-do the process. Next time we will start with an 80 grit sandpaper, move to 100 grit, then 120 grit and finish with a 150 grit. I probably won't use any electric sander because the swirls scared me. I know going up to a 150 grit will probably make the deck really slick but I think it will give it a really clean look. As you can see in the pictures there are still some black stuff in the wood and lots of "uneven spots" in the wood (which I didn't see until the oil was put on). This project was definitely a learning process for Katie and I.
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  #22  
Old 03-14-2016, 07:26 AM
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damaged442 damaged442 is offline
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Boat: 1989 Tristar 190, Indmar 351, 250HP
Location: Central NY
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Congrats on your new acquisition! Great looking boat!

As far as polishing out the hull, try the least aggressive method first. I wouldn't go at that by wet sanding first. My Tristar was way more oxidized than yours and I started with 3M Marine Restorer and Wax. Once you are done with that, top it with some Collinite Fiberglass Boat Wax or 845 Insulator wax and enjoy the shine!!
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  #23  
Old 03-14-2016, 07:59 AM
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bturner2 bturner2 is offline
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Boat: Maristar 200VRS w/ X2 Package, 2007, 310HP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie View Post
Hey thanks guys!

Rockman, not sure... I think it's the original cover? There's a hole there for the pylon (a plastic ring sewn in and all). Looks kinda strange.

Dive, for sure! Us too!

Rocketboy, we'll get you a picture today.

Hey does anyone have some insight on wet sanding? We've done our research (we thought), but feeling a little nervous now that we're actually doing it today. Specifically, how long are we supposed to sand before compounding? We've started with an 800 grit, then moving to 1000. Not sure if we should be sanding until the decal shadows and little nicks/scratches disappear or if we need to move through the whole process (wet sand, compound, polish) before everything's gone. Maybe we should just be sanding until we have an evenly sanded surface (everything's looking exactly the same amount of ****ty, no sanding stripes or anything, ha)?

Thanks!!
When it comes to hull restoration "do no harm" should be the the first rule to follow. Always start with the least abrasive tool/method and work from there. Pictures are always deceiving but from what I can see I don't see anything that would have me starting off with 800 grit. Doing so would sort of be like going after that platform with the 60 grit again. IMO you'd be better off block sanding any light scratches with 1000 then moving to a rubbing compound with a rotary buffer. Any chips or deeper scratches should be filled then put through the sanding/compounding process.

The problem you run into especially when just getting into doing a sand and buff project is learning what you can safely get away with. Sand too much gelcoat away and you won't have enough to buff for the final finish. Once you burn or sand through the surface there's only one fix and that's to the fiberglass shop for some re-gelcoating. Also if you do decide to wet sand make sure you're using a sanding block. It's very tempting to want to use the edge of the block or apply focused pressure on a scratch to remove it. Doing so will only result in a dip and will be obvious once the area is polished. Corners and any edges tend to be have a thinner gelcoat thickness and should also be treated carefully.

You guys are really killing it on this boat. You're going to have a great summer on one nice looking MC to be proud of.
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  #24  
Old 03-14-2016, 08:24 AM
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Rockman Rockman is offline
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Boat: '95 BF200 Yamaha ProV 200, '94 PS190 LT1 1:1
Location: SW Burbs of Chi-Town
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Great job you guys! Platform looks 100% better! Keep the pics coming on your progress!
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  #25  
Old 03-14-2016, 08:44 AM
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milehigh970 milehigh970 is offline
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Join Date: May 2010
Boat: 1986 skier w/ a fresh 351 and 2008 x2 w/ MCX
Location: colorado
Posts: 538
Good job!!! The "Rocky Mountain States" has me curious where you are located?
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  #26  
Old 03-14-2016, 12:43 PM
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Rocketboy Rocketboy is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2016
Boat: 1993 Mastercraft BF 200 Yamaha 200
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Showmaker View Post
@Rocketboy. Here is a pic of the cords going into the hole we drilled into the hull.
Thanks!
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  #27  
Old 03-14-2016, 01:44 PM
JSketto JSketto is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2016
Boat: 92 Mastercraft ProStar 190
Location: Southeast
Posts: 20
Great job on the teak...I heard that teak oil gets slippery...am I wrong or is there a better mix to use?
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  #28  
Old 03-14-2016, 01:59 PM
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Thrall Thrall is offline
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Boat: '06 X2 MCX
Location: Black Diamond, WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie View Post
Hey thanks guys!

Rockman, not sure... I think it's the original cover? There's a hole there for the pylon (a plastic ring sewn in and all). Looks kinda strange.

Dive, for sure! Us too!

Rocketboy, we'll get you a picture today.

Hey does anyone have some insight on wet sanding? We've done our research (we thought), but feeling a little nervous now that we're actually doing it today. Specifically, how long are we supposed to sand before compounding? We've started with an 800 grit, then moving to 1000. Not sure if we should be sanding until the decal shadows and little nicks/scratches disappear or if we need to move through the whole process (wet sand, compound, polish) before everything's gone. Maybe we should just be sanding until we have an evenly sanded surface (everything's looking exactly the same amount of ****ty, no sanding stripes or anything, ha)?

Thanks!!
Yes, and a lot of sanding and polishing on a '96 PS 190 at that. lol.
From the "before" pics of the boat, I don't see any areas that outwardly need to be wet sanded unless you're trying to remove all superficial scratches.
First, gel coat is many x thicker than auto paint or clearcoat, so there's less risk in burning through while sanding.
If removing scratches, I'd start with 800 or 1000 grit as you've done and sand until the scratches are almost gone (no need to sand the whole boat either unless it's all scratched up, just get an area little bigger than the scratched area and feather out how much you sand).
After 1000, I'd hit it with 1200grit until most/all of the 1000 scratches are gone. Sand in perpendicular passes, helps in removing sand scratches in the next phase. Use a rigid sanding block on flat areas and a flexible block on curved areas. Consistent pressure makes it go quicker and easier to "remove" the previous pass.
Then a med/heavy cut compound on a rotary polisher (orbital will take forever). Follow with a fine cut compound or polish, rotary again. May need a pass with glaze or swirl remover for darker colors depending on how well you do with the polish.
A little water is your friend when compounding or polishing as well. Once the pad is loaded with compound, you'll use less new compound with each area you move to and a little splash of water on the pad then a slow rpm pass with the polisher will bring out some fresh compound out of the pad. Hard to describe, but makes sense once you do it. Use a lot of water and you'll be slinging stuf everywhere. No water and you'll keep using more and more compound. For reference sake, I just finished off a quart bottle of rubbing compound and have done 2 boats and prolly the equivalent of a half dozen large cars/trucks.
Note, go easy on outside edges and outside corners sanding and polishing. The pressure applied multiplies significantly when point loaded on a corner. In fact, I rarely sand on a corner unless CAREFULLY trying to remove a scratch and at that, I'd rather see a slight shiny scratch in the gel than burn thru.
In short, with little experience, I'd start with the least invasive method first. Do a test section with the polisher and compound then polish and see if you like the results. If not, take it one step further and wet sand first. Figure out how involved you need to get before doing the whole boat.
Don't get too hung up on removing ALL the shadow from old decals, IMO. Especially if you're going to install new, even non matching decals in the same spot. Just putting a sticker over the area it breaks up the shadow.
There's a bunch of threads and instructions, materials to use etc on this forum.
Good luck, looks like a great project so far.
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  #29  
Old 03-14-2016, 02:02 PM
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Thrall Thrall is offline
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BTW, whatever you did to the gel in the "after" pics of the swim deck looks great!
I would call it a day with that finish...
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