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  #1  
Old 10-22-2018, 07:46 PM
iskyski iskyski is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2014
Boat: 1995 Mastercraft Maristar 200VRS
Location: West
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Mastercraft Engines

I have been a Mastercraft guy for a long time. Currently own a Ď95 Mastercraft MariStar and love it. In a few years am looking to upgrade and make a big jump from what I have currently. I get notified on the classified thread on this forum, and occasionally look on at my local classifieds too. I havenít been keeping a record or anything, and itís all anecdotal, but to me it seems that a lot of newer Mastercrafts being sold, have new or rebuilt engines...and the boats are not that old, just a few years old, with only say 500 boat hours and very little on the new engine.

-Has Mastercraft struggled with their engines in the last 10-15 years?
-Are there engines or years to stay away from? -Is this just the nature of boat engines and all manufacturers have the same amount of issue?

And Iím just curious, not trying to bash anyone, just trying to getting a bigger picture, and figure this is the place that would have the background to better answer this question. In fact thatís one of the reasons I love having a mastercraft...every problem I have needed help, this forum has had the answer!!!


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  #2  
Old 10-22-2018, 08:23 PM
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AZX46OD AZX46OD is offline
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Boat: 2014 X46 6.2L
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If you could give us an idea of year(s) and model(s) you are considering, we could give you a better idea. Generally all of the MC engines have done great. You'll get a few naysayers on the 8.1L, but the rest are pretty bulletproof, and plenty will swear by the 8.1L. All of the ILmor engines (since 2012 or so) have been solid performers. The 6.2L and 6.0L have be rockstars. The 5.7L is reliable but a bit small for 22+ foot boats.
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  #3  
Old 10-22-2018, 08:26 PM
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ttu ttu is offline
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Boat: 2007 X2 towed by a 2012 Touareg TDI
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I have a 07 x2 with the 310 rtp and have had no issues with the exception of the "j" cooling hose splitting right after I bought it new. there was a known issues with those hoses. I now have almost 800 hours and run around 3K+ in ballast
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  #4  
Old 10-22-2018, 08:29 PM
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ttu ttu is offline
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I take that back I did have to replace the fuel pump 600 hrs ago! so really no issues
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  #5  
Old 10-22-2018, 08:40 PM
jpage jpage is offline
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Boat: 2007 X2 & 1984 Stars & Stripes
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Not as caring owners. Just get it replaced under Warranty. They buy boats every year or 2


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  #6  
Old 10-23-2018, 08:51 AM
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bturner2 bturner2 is offline
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Boat: Maristar 200VRS w/ X2 Package, 2007, 310HP
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A lot of engines getting replaced are the result of freeze damage and this goes across the board in the marine industry. A lot of guys will "dry block" only to find that the block wasn't completely dry or won't winterize because they live in a warmer climate and misjudge how cold it actually gets in their garage during an unusual cold snap.

The other culprit I heard from my dealer was the surf boat effect. I'm told this is the result of a boat that's run out of trim from large amounts of ballast that force the boat to lean hard to the side. This can lead to oil starvation as the oil in the pan is displaced from the bottom of the oil pan to the side the boat is leaning on starving the pickup. Combine that with the duty cycle of operating a boat that is weighted with 3K+ in ballast (which is about the total occupant capacity of the boat), a full load of people/gear, and a low RPM for extended periods and you pretty much have a situation where you're going to find any weak links in the drive train. At least this is what I was told by my dealer.

He also stated that their doing about twice as much internal engine work as they did 10 - 15 years ago. This really isn't a surprise if you track how people have used their boats and the activities they participate in. Water skiing, while a high speed, high RPM activity was fairly light duty. The boats were kept light and once the initial load of pulling out with the skier was achieved the load decreased. The amount of time the skier actually was behind the boat was relatively short as well. Wakeboarding stepped up the load with bigger boat, ballast, people/gear and the aftermarket ballast as well. Speeds were also slower with the boat partially on plane to throw that bigger wake. Along with all this the duty cycle or load also increased. Fast forward to today with all the extra ballast, tabs, shapers and the number of people/ gear added to the mix and it's easy to see why that once bulletproof engine is starting to meet it's match.
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  #7  
Old 10-23-2018, 09:22 AM
hunter991 hunter991 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bturner2 View Post
A lot of engines getting replaced are the result of freeze damage and this goes across the board in the marine industry. A lot of guys will "dry block" only to find that the block wasn't completely dry or won't winterize because they live in a warmer climate and misjudge how cold it actually gets in their garage during an unusual cold snap.

The other culprit I heard from my dealer was the surf boat effect. I'm told this is the result of a boat that's run out of trim from large amounts of ballast that force the boat to lean hard to the side. This can lead to oil starvation as the oil in the pan is displaced from the bottom of the oil pan to the side the boat is leaning on starving the pickup. Combine that with the duty cycle of operating a boat that is weighted with 3K+ in ballast (which is about the total occupant capacity of the boat), a full load of people/gear, and a low RPM for extended periods and you pretty much have a situation where you're going to find any weak links in the drive train. At least this is what I was told by my dealer.

He also stated that their doing about twice as much internal engine work as they did 10 - 15 years ago. This really isn't a surprise if you track how people have used their boats and the activities they participate in. Water skiing, while a high speed, high RPM activity was fairly light duty. The boats were kept light and once the initial load of pulling out with the skier was achieved the load decreased. The amount of time the skier actually was behind the boat was relatively short as well. Wakeboarding stepped up the load with bigger boat, ballast, people/gear and the aftermarket ballast as well. Speeds were also slower with the boat partially on plane to throw that bigger wake. Along with all this the duty cycle or load also increased. Fast forward to today with all the extra ballast, tabs, shapers and the number of people/ gear added to the mix and it's easy to see why that once bulletproof engine is starting to meet it's match.
Interesting, i wonder if Ilmor will design an oil pickup like the Raptor which keeps lubrication even at listing. But yes, i think a big enough motor to do the job you are asking the boat to do is important.
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  #8  
Old 10-23-2018, 09:42 AM
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JimN JimN is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bturner2 View Post
The other culprit I heard from my dealer was the surf boat effect. I'm told this is the result of a boat that's run out of trim from large amounts of ballast that force the boat to lean hard to the side. This can lead to oil starvation as the oil in the pan is displaced from the bottom of the oil pan to the side the boat is leaning on starving the pickup. Combine that with the duty cycle of operating a boat that is weighted with 3K+ in ballast (which is about the total occupant capacity of the boat), a full load of people/gear, and a low RPM for extended periods and you pretty much have a situation where you're going to find any weak links in the drive train. At least this is what I was told by my dealer.
I'm not sure I buy the oil starvation idea- it's not moving or accelerating very fast, it can't list too hard and it's not a matter of having all of the oil pumping out of the pan while it's running. Also, the viscosity will prevent it sloshing too hard unless the acceleration is extreme or the boat is turning hard. If it was a real problem, I think they would go to a dry sump. I would say that the load from the prop due to the weight and drag causes more wear than anything else.
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  #9  
Old 10-23-2018, 10:18 AM
gweaver gweaver is offline
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Boat: 2003 VRS 230 w/X-boat package, 8.1L
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Indmar did send out Service Bulletin SV2006-2 back in 2006 which said they were increasing the oil capacity of their 8.1l engines over concerns of oil starvation. Their concern was over oil moving away from the pickup on acceleration on heavy boats. There's a thread about it here. LINK

G
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  #10  
Old 10-23-2018, 10:53 AM
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JimN JimN is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gweaver View Post
Indmar did send out Service Bulletin SV2006-2 back in 2006 which said they were increasing the oil capacity of their 8.1l engines over concerns of oil starvation. Their concern was over oil moving away from the pickup on acceleration on heavy boats. There's a thread about it here. LINK

G
Hard acceleration is one thing, wakeboarding at moderate, consistent speed is another.

I'd think this would be a thing of the past.
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