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  #11  
Old 01-27-2018, 05:39 PM
waterlogged882 waterlogged882 is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2004
Boat: 93 190
Location: lake
Posts: 11,800
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bernie123 View Post
I have another question or hundreds! Where can I buy motor mounts for an 84 Mastercraft and exhaust headers?
You may very well have this in action to replace all of the engine mounts for your PCM 351. That's good.

You may be tempted to piece-meal them together with individual parts from here and there (by looking in multiple places) so my point is this; go ahead and buy the entire four assemblies and save time and headache over a few dollars. I've been all down that road....you'll end up losing more time waiting and fitting than it is worth the small savings. Just $0.02 but you can move right along with the full pre-assembled parts.

You'll find the front mounts for a Ford engine are no longer available but a substitute (adapter style) part is available. Discount Inboard Marine will tell you this upon ordering. It will work in that manner.

You can probably find the exhaust manifold(s) a little cheaper elsewhere but not a lot. Your call.

While you're there at Discount Inboard, don't forget the gasket set(s) for the head(s), manifold(s), and the riser(s).

Also get all new bolts /studs for each component and apply Never-seize to each.

While you're there, get new exhaust hose. If yours are OEM or have some age on them, they can collapse from the inside and ruin a good day. New hose is the ticket. Put the hose onto the muffler first, then affix the hose onto the riser, then set the riser last. Much easier to work the hose installation that way. Read that again.

You'll also need to round up the torque specs for the install. I have them somewhere close by. Remember most of these bolts require multiple passes and recommended pattern sequence for the proper procedure.

A number one priority and a must is to check for oil pan clearance from the tracking fin studs. Make sure you have adequate clearance as you set the engine down. Nothing worse than poking a dent or a hole in an oil pan. They aren't cheap in price. Plan ahead four or five steps. Take your time. Also make sure you have clearance at the flywheel / bell-housing / hull area. That cannot set on the hull.
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Last edited by waterlogged882; 01-28-2018 at 07:32 AM.
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  #12  
Old 01-27-2018, 10:15 PM
Bernie123 Bernie123 is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2018
Boat: 84 MasterCraft. 351W
Location: West Coast
Posts: 11
Wow thank you so much
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  #13  
Old 01-27-2018, 10:57 PM
waterlogged882 waterlogged882 is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2004
Boat: 93 190
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Originally Posted by Bernie123 View Post
Wow thank you so much
I got to thinking on this and realized I was not thinking about exactly what you are doing.

In my previous post I was assuming you were lifting the engine to do the head work on a bench or stand. If that is the case, what I previously posted stands.

Backing up a bit here, and correct me if I am not seeing this; you would not have to lift your engine for new mounts if you choose to work with the engine in place.

You can support each corner of the engine, one corner at a time and replace each mount. The caveat would be if a bolt is inaccessible (for whatever reason) and you were forced to lift the engine as a last resort to get access to something.

That said, I have used a bottle jack on each corner to support the engine and unbolt / replace the engine mounts. That would be even easier with the exhaust manifold off to access each mount. I had the floor out on this boat so a jack fit easy. You could always support from overhead. Doesn't take much at all to support a corner. Actually you might could remove a single mount without any support (one at a time). All I supported for was to take the weight off the bolt / bolt hole. Your mileage may vary.

Because of changing the engine mounts you need to check the alignment. Make sure you have the flange couplings to within 0.003" after moving the engine / engine mounts. Before you break the flange connection between the shaft and the transmission, stop there and watch closely (and feel) how the shaft comes out of the inner-race of the transmission flange. If it slides out easily and no major movement, you're close to alignment. If it springs out in some direction when you pull it back, then you will know about how much the adjustment needs to be. Pay attention to how it comes apart.

If you replace the mounts one at a time as mentioned, you should be close but you will still need to break the flange connection, do an alignment check with feeler gauges, and then reassemble. I recommend not to forego this step, regardless of how certain you may feel it is in place properly.

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Last edited by waterlogged882; 01-28-2018 at 07:42 AM.
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  #14  
Old 01-31-2018, 02:02 AM
MDB1056 MDB1056 is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2017
Boat: 1983 Starts & Stripes Powerslot, 92 Hydrodyne Comp
Location: southeast
Posts: 89
GREAT information from Waterlogged as usual. I second his comments specifically on the exhaust hoses - REPLACE THEM as his pictures indicate they will collapse on the inside and you won't see it. The 83 project boat I acquired in October had exactly that happen. While I was replacing all the circulation and exhaust hoses anyway, it wasn't until I removed them that I could see the same as his pictures show, the internal collapse.
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