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Old 08-20-2018, 02:48 PM
86Skier 86Skier is offline
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Overheated, now turns over VERY hard... what next?

Short story, I finally pulled my ’86 Skier out of the garage and dusted it off last week for a family vacation. With two little kids, it’d been neglected all year, choosing instead to spend time on the fishing boat.

But I spent the weekend prior cleaning it up, oil change, etc., and had hooked up my bucket-style shore start to the intake water filter and to the garden hose. One crank in the driveway and she fired up perfectly. Idled down nice, temps great, oil pressure great, all good.

Headed north. Unloaded at the launch as my brother drove away. Started great, idled away from the launch perfectly. Got out to deeper water and away I went. Everything was great as I headed a crossed the lake to the cottage… UNTIL… I smelled that sweet smell of burning impeller… looked back and I had steam coming out of the engine box. Looked down just as I shut it off and saw that the water temp had crept up to about 180 and the oil pressure was still perfect. Opened the engine box and saw water everywhere…. And in that moment noticed my screw up… the raw water pickup hose hadn’t been reconnected. Engine had been running perfectly otherwise. Unfortunately, I also watched as the temp continued to spike… probably topping at about 200-ish. Hooked up the hose and attempted once to restart, hoping to recirculate cold water, but the engine just lugged to turn…. Not completely seized, but very stiff, and no start. Sat for a good hour while my brother hunted for someone at the launch willing to give me a tow, while I sulked in what I had just done.

Once back on land, I pulled the water pump apart and confirmed the impeller was toast. Pulled the left rear plug and noticed water in the cylinder. Parked it and tried to forget about it for the one week of vacation I had.

Last night when I got home, I pulled the exhaust manifolds and plugs and confirmed water in 3 of the 8 cylinders (351 PCM Ford). Peering in the exhaust ports, none of the exhaust valves appear to be broken. Removing the valve covers shows no identifiable damage to the rockers, springs, rods, etc.

Drained the oil and there was obvious water in the oil. Pulled the filter and found the same. Carefully opened up the filter and could see no signs of metal shavings in the pleats.

But it turns too hard to crank enough to run a realistic compression test. Even with a good battery and a charger on jump mode, she turns over very stiff.

Where would you go from here? Remove the intake and heads? I’m guessing a damaged head gasket, and assume cylinder damage based on how hard it now turns over, but would like input before I just start tearing too deep.
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  #2  
Old 08-20-2018, 03:00 PM
EricB EricB is offline
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Pull all the spark plugs first and turn over. See which cylinders shoot out water.
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Old 08-20-2018, 03:06 PM
86Skier 86Skier is offline
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I did yesterday.... water in the left rear (#8) and two of the right cylinders... I believe #1 and #3 (it's written down at home, but I'm at the office).
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Old 08-20-2018, 03:12 PM
CrashCourse316 CrashCourse316 is offline
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Man that's a doozy....poor Skier.. (-_-). I would think the hard turnover is not specifically the head gasket since that has to do with compression and not how well the engine turns over? do you have the option to drop a little oil directly into the cylinders and try and turn over the engine without plugs in? would get rid of all resistance related to compression and with oil in it, it should confirm you have lubrication. if its still slow to turn the issue probably has to do with cylinder issues.

It could just be that the cylinders are still water lubricated and need to have that water be replaced with oil.

head gasket might still be toast though...I'm not sure how water effects a head gasket.

I would start with the pulled plugs and test turn over. if still slow then shoot some oil up in there and see if that helps. if it's hard to "spray oil" in the the cylinders use wd-40. it will help repel the water out from the cylinders.
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Old 08-20-2018, 03:14 PM
86Skier 86Skier is offline
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I will try adding a small amount of oil to each cylinder tonight and give it a go.
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Old 08-20-2018, 03:18 PM
CrashCourse316 CrashCourse316 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 86Skier View Post
I will try adding a small amount of oil to each cylinder tonight and give it a go.

I would try everything possible before pulling out cylinders.....That is one hell of a project I have been told.
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Old 08-20-2018, 03:24 PM
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Maristar210 Maristar210 is offline
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That might just work. You could be very lucky. I hope you are.
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Old 08-20-2018, 03:37 PM
CrashCourse316 CrashCourse316 is offline
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Originally Posted by Maristar210 View Post
That might just work. You could be very lucky. I hope you are.
Yea thats what I'm thinking as well. If the engine didnt run long with water in the cylinder it hopefully didn't cause significant damage to the cylinder walls or piston rings. If this just happened and you saw water in the oil means water got in there through the cylinder walls. which mean you are currently lubricated with water....If you have not turned it over enough to replace the water with some sort of lube. it will be tough to get it going...once it gets going and gets the water out though it should start turning no problem and at that point just cylinder compression test it to check for damage.

I had an oil leak in an old car when i was younger and didn't know any beter. ran my car out of oil and then some. Litterally the car siezed up fully and broke a cylinder rod completely off. Dumped oil in it and it started up and ran fine to get home with broken cylinder parts clanking around in the engine. The first few turns though were very hard to get going.
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Old 08-20-2018, 03:46 PM
CrashCourse316 CrashCourse316 is offline
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Oh side note.. Marvel Mystery Oil. check it out. might want to put that in the cylinders if you can find some locally.

EDIT: or seafoam....or anything that is a engine lube/cleaner....better than nothin
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Old 08-20-2018, 04:47 PM
86Skier 86Skier is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrashCourse316 View Post
Oh side note.. Marvel Mystery Oil. check it out. might want to put that in the cylinders if you can find some locally.

EDIT: or seafoam....or anything that is a engine lube/cleaner....better than nothin
Any suggestions on what I should start with if I can find it?

Marvel Mystery Oil first if available? Then Seafoam? Then ordinary engine oil? i.e., is one better than the other, or will all likely serve the purpose?
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