Go Back   TeamTalk > Maintenance Tips, How-tos and Refurbishing Topics > Restorations and Refurbishments

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 09-01-2016, 11:47 PM
Bucky508 Bucky508 is offline
TT Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Boat: 1994 Prostar 205
Location: Northeast
Posts: 2
1994 Prostar restoration

Hello ALL!

I am new to the forum but have been a lurker for quite some time. I love restoring boats and learning as I go along. I recently completed a Checkmate 13ft restoration. My next challenge is a 94 Mastercraft Prostar 205. First year of the EFI. I always loved the Mastercrafts but could never afford one. I found this project boat for 5k locally 700 hrs (I feel like it was a steal!). Cheap enough the mrs let it slide by. Now what to do!? Was this a good purchase??

The good:

Motor, prop, shaft, gauges, hull are all solid. Mechanically it is ready to drop in the water.

The bad:

Vinyl is shot to hell, carpet is history, dash is weathered, gelcoat is oxidized, no bimini, and audio is all inoperable, and I've never drive an ski boat so I have no idea what to expect.

Questions:
Do I go snap in carpet over existing or just cut and glue down?
How can I remove the oxidation on the hull?
Any other known issues to look for in these boats?

Figure I can do about 5k in restoration budget. What should I prioritize in my to do list?
Attached Images
        
__________________
-Bucky

"If it ain't broke why buy it"
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-02-2016, 12:06 AM
Spidermonkey Spidermonkey is offline
TT Regular
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Boat: Baja 16ss w/115 TOP, 1992 BF200
Location: Manitoba, Canada
Posts: 69
Looks like a nice project. Well, as far as the carpet, im not sure what most mastercraft gurus will say, but my experience has been to remove the old and glue down new. I don't have any experience with those boats so hopefully someone else can chime in who has done it on these boats.
As for the oxidation, I have had good luck using 800 grit sand paper and wet sanding it. I then go over with 1000 wet, then use rubbing compound with a mechanical buffer. By now your arms will be dead tired, but putting on a good coat of Marine wax and buffing it should make it come out like new. If its really bad and the 800 isn't doing it, you can try 600. the 600 and 800 will still be hazy after but removes the "bad layer", its the 1000 that starts to bring the shine back. Some guys will skip the 1000 and go to a coarse rub compound, the go to a fine compound after.
Remember to rinse the boat well between changes of sand paper so your not rubbing previous coarse grit with your finer grit.
Thats just what has worked for me.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-02-2016, 07:38 AM
mikeg205's Avatar
mikeg205 mikeg205 is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Boat: 1995 Pro Star 205 5.7 Liter
Location: Plainfield - Joliet, IL
Posts: 17,162
Send a message via Skype™ to mikeg205
congrats and roll up the sleeves - it will look great and last a long time.. 693 hours young.
__________________
...A bad day water skiing still beats a good day at work...1995 Pro Star 205....
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-02-2016, 08:01 AM
bturner2's Avatar
bturner2 bturner2 is offline
MC Maniac
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Boat: Maristar 200VRS w/ X2 Package, 2007, 310HP
Location: Brighton, MI
Posts: 3,838
Depends on what you plan to do with it once it's done. If you're keeping it, then do whatever you want. It's your boat so you can make whatever changes you want and enjoy it.

If you plan to sell it and want to maximize resale value you'll find MasterCraft owners prefer seeing a boat that looks like it did when it left the factory. The exception would be in areas that enhance performance/operation while keeping the boat as close to stock in appearance. A good example would be an upgraded stereo and tower speakers. A bad example would be a dash mounted fish finder.

Even some of the worst looking, faded hulls can be brought back to life through wet sanding and polishing. As bad as yours looks now I believe yours would come back as well. Only one way to find out so you may want to purchase the materials needed and pick a test area, that transom looks ripe for a before/after test. There are tons of posts on this site about how to do this as was as articles and videos on YouTube with instructions on how to get started and what you'll need.

Looks like you got the project boat I've been looking for. Can't wait to see your progress! Good luck.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-02-2016, 09:33 AM
d2jp's Avatar
d2jp d2jp is offline
MC Fanatic
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Boat: 1992 PS 205-351w,285HO
Location: Smith Mountain Lake, VA
Posts: 895
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bucky508 View Post
Hello ALL!

I am new to the forum but have been a lurker for quite some time. I love restoring boats and learning as I go along. I recently completed a Checkmate 13ft restoration. My next challenge is a 94 Mastercraft Prostar 205. First year of the EFI. I always loved the Mastercrafts but could never afford one. I found this project boat for 5k locally 700 hrs (I feel like it was a steal!). Cheap enough the mrs let it slide by. Now what to do!? Was this a good purchase??

The good:

Motor, prop, shaft, gauges, hull are all solid. Mechanically it is ready to drop in the water.

The bad:

Vinyl is shot to hell, carpet is history, dash is weathered, gelcoat is oxidized, no bimini, and audio is all inoperable, and I've never drive an ski boat so I have no idea what to expect.

Questions:
Do I go snap in carpet over existing or just cut and glue down?
How can I remove the oxidation on the hull?
Any other known issues to look for in these boats?

Figure I can do about 5k in restoration budget. What should I prioritize in my to do list?
I think you got a good deal, especially if you're DIY on everything. If I were to prioritize I would start with a good deep cleaning of everything. Upholstery work is expensive but honestly yours might actually clean up pretty well. It won't look new, but it won't cost $3K either

Before you start carpet work, I would either use a pressure washer or old fashioned scrub brush and hot water + detergent and really clean the carpet good. You may be surprised. I would also deep clean all the vinyl. There is thread on here by Sodar on his vinyl cleaning process - check this out. Or just buy some Totally Awesome cleaner at Dollar General, and use that full strength with a scrub brush as a start. Again, you may be surprised at the results. It's got some rips and tears but nothing too horrible from the pics. You can do the same for the dash too. If it all cleans up well, apply some 303 protectant afterwards and feel good about saving $4000~$5000 on carpet and vinyl replacement.

Others have suggested how to get rid of the oxidation and I think your hull will shine again with some elbow grease. Look online for new hull grahics.

Don't overlook some engine basics, both mechancial and cosmetic. Fluid changes, impellar change, tune-up, etc.

Lastly, I tell everyone I think these trailers are more work than the boats, LOL. Check the bearings, clean and repack. The brakes are probably shot. etc, etc.

My suggestion is clean and scrub, rinse and repeat - you might not need too much else depending upon your plans for the boat.

Driving an inboard is different than an outboard or I/O. It's much more responsive to driver input. However, you cannot raise the prop and you have tracking fins on the hull so extra care is needed around shallow water. In reverse, the boat will want to back towards the drivers side only - there isn't any steering in reverse as no water is going past the rudder. I suggest practicing backing and pretending to dock out in the middle of a lake, way before you actually have to try to pull in for fuel, etc. When you're ready, just bumping the boat in/out of gear is all that is needed in most cases, and slower is usually always better.

I think you got a very good deal. To bring back to 'like new' you'd spend close to what you could find a well cared for 205 selling for, mostly b/c vinyl and carpet work is expensive. But as much DIY and making it a 'work in progress' while enjoying the boat after a deep clean and polish makes is a real bargin!!
__________________
Jack
-----------------------------------------
1992 ProSport 205
(Former) 1989 ProStar 190 Power Slot
Smith Mountain Lake, VA

Last edited by d2jp; 09-02-2016 at 09:49 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-02-2016, 10:14 AM
stig stig is offline
TT Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Boat: MC,197,2004,350
Location: midatlantic
Posts: 354
I've been a Porsche nut all my life so I can only speak about what I know with them. Since they are a quality high end brand like Mastercraft I think there are some generalizations you can make.

In the Porsche world, there is a saying: "For every dollar you add in modifications to a 911, deduct two from it's value"

I would think MC's are the same. Like said above, unless it enhances or upgrades to the function of the boat, keep it stock.

Now the rule for 911's apply to most, but if you're name is Magnus Walker you'll get more for it by messing with it. (google his 911 collection, and try to keep the drool off your keyboard)
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-02-2016, 11:32 AM
cbryan70's Avatar
cbryan70 cbryan70 is online now
MC Maniac
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Boat: 1993 Prostar 205
Location: midwest
Posts: 4,650
I agree that interior may be serviceable. Not perfect but will let you enjoy it while you do the rest of the boat. That will be by far your biggest expense.

I would start with cleaning that using Sodars method or just some dollar store cleaner and see where you get. Then I would do an oil change, trans fluid change and take it out to enjoy for the day. After that start on the hull with a 3m cutting compound. Lots of threads on how to bring the gel back to life.

Lastly...keep posting pictures and updating this thread
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoosier Bob
She always misses me and when I turn her on it is hard to turn her off! She is MC and she completes me! She is the first ride that wants it as much as I do!
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 09-02-2016, 01:10 PM
AZDave's Avatar
AZDave AZDave is offline
TT Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Boat: 1993 Stars & Stripes Prostar 190 351 285 hp
Location: sw
Posts: 479
I would go over every channel of that trailer with a hammer and verify the metal integrity. If that trailer has seen salt, you may find some problems.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 09-03-2016, 06:54 PM
Bucky508 Bucky508 is offline
TT Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Boat: 1994 Prostar 205
Location: Northeast
Posts: 2
So had a chance to crack into the boat.

First of all thanks for all the great tips!!

I found a dollar general and picked up some totally awesome. Did not get a chance to try it yet.

I pulled all the bad vinyl pieces out of the boat to bring to get redone. Fairly interesing mounting system for screwing them to the platforms. Just a threaded locker. I might devise something different for reattach. It seems like the threaded locker could strip out of the wood side panels fairly easy and then you would have a heck of a time getting them off. I am also debating rebuilding the wood side panels with marine plywood then having those covered. Verdict still out. Now my workshop is covered in vinyl pieces!!

Overall as I get into this project I am impressed with how well built these boats were. Everything fits so precise and the fiberglass work is really clean.

I power washed the carpet as suggested and was so surprised!!! I blasted away moss and sludge to reveal almost new looking carpet!! There is one are of the left side walkthrough that is torn so I am debating having some 14 inch by 58 inch mats made for each side. Figure if I can match the mats close to the stock carpet it would look just like floormats in a car. Otherwise I would have to recarpet the whole thing and the rest is fairly good. Thoughts?
Attached Images
    
__________________
-Bucky

"If it ain't broke why buy it"
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 09-03-2016, 07:03 PM
03 35th Anniversary's Avatar
03 35th Anniversary 03 35th Anniversary is offline
MC Devotee
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Boat: Searching
Location: Midlothian, Tx.
Posts: 4,093
If you are a hands on do it yourself dude (which it sounds like you are). Then $5,000 is doable. I say that from experience with 1993 that was in way worse shape!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bucky508 View Post
Hello ALL!

I am new to the forum but have been a lurker for quite some time. I love restoring boats and learning as I go along. I recently completed a Checkmate 13ft restoration. My next challenge is a 94 Mastercraft Prostar 205. First year of the EFI. I always loved the Mastercrafts but could never afford one. I found this project boat for 5k locally 700 hrs (I feel like it was a steal!). Cheap enough the mrs let it slide by. Now what to do!? Was this a good purchase??

The good:

Motor, prop, shaft, gauges, hull are all solid. Mechanically it is ready to drop in the water.

The bad:

Vinyl is shot to hell, carpet is history, dash is weathered, gelcoat is oxidized, no bimini, and audio is all inoperable, and I've never drive an ski boat so I have no idea what to expect.

Questions:
Do I go snap in carpet over existing or just cut and glue down?
How can I remove the oxidation on the hull?
Any other known issues to look for in these boats?

Figure I can do about 5k in restoration budget. What should I prioritize in my to do list?
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
fixes, prostar 205, restoration, restore, used boat

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:36 PM.


2018