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Old 08-15-2016, 09:55 AM
Legolamb Legolamb is offline
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Boat: 1996 Prostar 190, LT1
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Hot wheel hubs - single axle trailer

Wondering what are normal temps for hubs, wheels, tires on a 90 degree day. Being the first trailer I've owned with brakes, I'm not sure what normal temps are. Trailer is a 1996 single axle Mastercraft that holds my PS190. I've replaced my actuator, both wheel backing plates with all new components, blown out the brake lines with air to make sure there are no restrictions, new bearings, grease and seals, axle nut only hand snug, and properly adjusted the brake pads and confirmed they are not dragging. Checked with an infrared gauge I'm getting hub temps around 140 degrees, and tire temps around 110after a 20 mile drive at highway speeds on hot days. Obviously I am applying the brakes to come to a stop, am I feeling the heat generated by the braking action? After replacing every component, I'm not sure where else to look. Maybe these temps are normal. I did check my buddies 93, 205 trailer after a cruise, and his hubs were very warm to hot as well, and he does service his bearings regularly.

Any thoughts or advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Dave
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Old 08-15-2016, 01:03 PM
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Keith2230 Keith2230 is offline
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140 in hot weather seems in the right ballpark to me. What are the temps on the front wheels of your tow vehicle for the same trip? Should be pretty close to your trailer.

Everything you said sounds good except I've always been told to take the castle nut on the spindle to tight and then back off 1/4 turn so you have just a little play in the bearings.

Besides braking and bearings your tires can be the other source of a lot of heat. I'd suggest running them at the max rating. Should be around 50 lbs cold. You'd be surprised how much heat an under inflated tire can create.
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Old 08-15-2016, 01:57 PM
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d2jp d2jp is offline
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Boat: 1992 PS 205-351w,285HO
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I just replaced my actuator and replaced my non-working drums with UFP disc. I also back off my hub bearing castle nuts one flat which means there is usually just a little play if the wheel is off the ground and you're shaking the tire but don't feel any play if the wheel is not on the hub and your trying to wobble the hub.
The brakes don't drag but they do slightly touch the rotor in a couple of places as the wheel rotates. Anyway - first tow this weekend in hilly terrain and 99 degree day. Hubs were really hot to the touch. I bought an IR thermometer at Horrible Freight yesterday. Just sitting in the sun my truck wheels were at 129. Will compare trailer hubs to truck with the IR next time out.



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Old 08-15-2016, 06:11 PM
FrankSchwab FrankSchwab is offline
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140 sounds fine to me. I normally tow in Az on 110 degree days - going to Powell this year, I checked at the bottom of a long downhill and got 160, and saw 140 after a long flat pull.

I have a lot more experience with the "put a finger on it" method - if you can put a finger on the hub for more than a second, it's fine, less than a second you need to look at what's going on (like the long downhill), if you leave skin behind and scream in pain, then there's a problem.
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Old 08-16-2016, 09:24 AM
Legolamb Legolamb is offline
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Thanks Guys, I feel better about my hub temps although I wish they ran as cool as my trailer without brakes. So about 50 degrees warmer than ambient temps seems to be normal. D2jp, I do know that disc brakes generate more heat than drums, not sure what is acceptable but I do know they recommend hi-temp bearing grease. Does anyone let their hubs cool down before backing into the water?
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Old 08-16-2016, 01:12 PM
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Keith2230 Keith2230 is offline
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I stop just long enough to prep the boat for launch. I do have the oil baths on mine so they tend to run a bit cooler than yours.

Even so I wouldn't worry about letting them cool. Dunk it and go. If you used hi-temp bearing grease it's not going to melt out until your well over 300 degrees. I've heard of oil bath users having issues with cracking the lexan siteglass when the hot hubs hit the water but your traditional grease bearings don't have that issue. These trailers get a lot of abuse so maintenance is really the key. If you want to be super safe, pull the bearings every year. Inspect for wear, replace components if necessary. Otherwise grease them back up and enjoy another season.
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Old 08-17-2016, 04:45 AM
ac505 ac505 is offline
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I just regreased the hubs as I managed to cook them on my last trip. I had to brake HARD about a mile before the slipway because some idiot pulled out in front of me, the draw bar didn't fully lengthen afterwards so I dragged the brakes for the last mile. A nice smell of brake lining when I arrived at the slip and no way would I have tried the finger test mentioned above!

On the plus side, the brake linings are perfectly bedded in now, and I have disassembled and inspected all the hubs, regressed the bearings and fixed the sticky drawbar.

From a maintenance perspective, it is a good idea to regrease the bearings at the end of the season as you don't want any moisture sitting in there over winter quietly destroying the bearings. I pull and replace the grease seal each other so that I can properly inspect the inner bearing and repack with new grease.
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Old 08-17-2016, 09:40 AM
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d2jp d2jp is offline
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Based upon my experience removing my old (1993) inner UFP slide actuator: Once a year, I would recommend removing the pins and pulling the actuator as far forward as possible, wiping down, inspecting the plastic wear pad, greasing both the metal wheels in the front and plastic ones in the back and reinstalling. I would make sure to have new slide pins before doing this in case you have to replace them. Granted mine had been in almost 25 years, but I had to beat the crap out of them with a small sledge hammer to get them out. Reading through other forums - this is pretty common with these pins.
I spoke with customer service at UFP yesterday, impressed with their support. I was told someone would call me back within an hour, and within 30 minutes they did. They confirmed the disc hubs will run hot, and should be given a chance to cool before backing into water. Someone on here had stated the disc hubs should be close in temp to the front hub of the tow vehicle and they concurred. They also recommended, as preventative maintenance, a separate ground wire on my reverse solenoid - which I had already done. There are 2 small holes on the bottom of the solenoid. A #8-32 screw fits in either hole and a wire from here to the trailer ground is what is suggested. This ensures the solenoid has a solid ground and not depending upon a ground through the hitch ball via the tow vehicle. Anyways, more info than anyone wanted to know about UFP disc brakes
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Old 08-17-2016, 10:02 AM
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mikeg205 mikeg205 is offline
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i have the old drum brake on my 1995... mine get very warm on the way to the boat ramp... I wait 5 -10 minutes sometimes.. so I compensate by regreasing before I leave the launch... I do that because I get a little water pushed out every time... takes a few minutes..

I use synthetic mobil 1 grease - what surprises me is the dirty grease that comes out every time... the seals a good but the quick temp drop will always suck water in and push grease out the fron of my bearing buddy... not a alot but enough.. which stays on my mind.. a tube of gease is $9 - cheap cheap maintenance or the season.
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Old 08-20-2016, 05:41 PM
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d2jp d2jp is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Legolamb View Post
Thanks Guys, I feel better about my hub temps although I wish they ran as cool as my trailer without brakes. So about 50 degrees warmer than ambient temps seems to be normal. D2jp, I do know that disc brakes generate more heat than drums, not sure what is acceptable but I do know they recommend hi-temp bearing grease. Does anyone let their hubs cool down before backing into the water?


I checked mine today. 85-92 ambient temperature. My trailer hubs/rotors and truck hubs/rotors measure almost exactly the same. I made several readings, hilly terrain and single axle trailer with PS205 about 40 miles each way. Temps ranged from 117~137 with a guestimated avg of 127-I'm good with these temps. My OCD mind started wondering if newer aluminum spoke-type trailer wheels might tow a little cooler due to better air circulation/flow around the rotors compared to the early 90's chromed steel wheels.....


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