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Old 04-18-2017, 10:25 AM
skiboyny skiboyny is offline
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Prostar 190 Trailer brakes

I have just recently res-erected my trailer brakes (drum) which haven't worked in many years. I installed new backing plates filled the UFP A-60 with fluid and bled them with the screwdriver method. They bled fine there was no rust in the master cylinder. The brakes work fine with the screwdriver working the plunger. They lock up nice with pressure and release fine when you let off. I thought all was well till I took the boat for a 5 minute ride. Both drums got really hot! One of my boat buddies fell off during the trip I assume from the heat.(improper installation is not out of the question though!) Each wheel was turning fine when jacked up and again the plunger worked them fine. What could be causing brake drag if that's what it is? Could there still be a problem with the actuator? If it works with the plunger is that absolute or is there other possibilities? Could really use some help here!
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Old 04-18-2017, 10:37 AM
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AZDave AZDave is offline
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If it has a reverse lock out, try trailering with it locked out. If they still get hot, try greasing the bearings. It sounds like either the actuator or the brake cylinders are sticking. How are the pads? Do the wheels spin freely?
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Old 04-18-2017, 10:47 AM
skiboyny skiboyny is offline
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That was my next move (trailering with the lockout pin in) The pads,cylinders etc. are brand new (new backing plates) The one wheel has some drag to it. Nothing I can do changes that. Opening the shoes all the way still some drag not enough to keep the wheel form spinning just enough to hear it. The other perfectly free. I don't understand why that is either. Both got hot though. In fact the side the bearing buddy fell off was the one that spins the cleanest. Thanks for helping.
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Old 04-19-2017, 09:20 AM
Legolamb Legolamb is offline
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I have the same year boat and trailer, and essentially the same story with hub heat. I chased the heat problem for two seasons, replacing bearings several times, and eventually all other brake components including a new actuator and master cylinder last year. I was verifying actual temps with an infrared gun, and was always usually seeing about 50-60F higher than ambient temps, which equated to 140-160F on hot days. The heat never went away, and I have come to the conclusion that this setup generates and retains a lot of heat even when everything is working correctly. So last year, I ended up replacing the stock steel rims with 15" aluminum wheels, and for whatever reason my hubs were much cooler with this setup (30-40F cooler) Not sure if the stock steel rims were too constrictive and the aluminum rims have better airflow around the wheel. I think in stock form, you are always going to have hot hubs.
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Old 04-19-2017, 09:58 AM
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jsturvey jsturvey is offline
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A couple years ago I replaced all 4 brake backs on my trailer. I bought I had them adjusted correctly, but then just one of the the drums started getting very hot while running. Pulled the drum and readjusted the shoes and it's been working fine since. Braking is always going to generate heat, you just need to determine what is normal versus too much. Good Luck!


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Old 04-19-2017, 10:41 AM
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mikeg205 mikeg205 is offline
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screwdriver method lousy to bleed... my trailer machined gunned until I bled them properly - any air on the wheel cylinder will cause a problem once the heat starts.. I thought I had all air out - got a manual pump bleeder - changed fluid - as was really surprised to find air in the line - checked bleed after pump last season no air - no machine gunning sounds.

Also make sure actuator moving freely in the insert..
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Old 04-19-2017, 11:15 AM
skiboyny skiboyny is offline
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Locked the breaks out and took it for a spin. Cool as a cucumber! It's brake drag of some sort. My actuator fails the swirl test that the manual suggests to do if both brakes over heat. It suggests that without the swirl at the beginning compression of the plunger the fluid isn't returning to the reservoir and it remains pressurized. It seems to work really well in both directions when jacked up but who knows what happens when underway. I really feel like I got a good bleed lots of pressure on the cylinders you can hear the springs with the screwdriver. I'm ordering the A-60 complete. Doesn't make total sense but there seems to be little else.
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Old 04-20-2017, 07:44 PM
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AZDave AZDave is offline
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Sounds like you got it figured out. I think the manual bleed is a great idea when you get new parts.
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Old 04-26-2017, 12:01 PM
skiboyny skiboyny is offline
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Replaced the actuator. It solved the overheating brake problem. Not without problems though. One of the wheel cylinders on my brand new backing plate is leaking. Also one of my bearing buddies thinks staying on the wheel isn't anything it wants to do anymore! UGH.. The wheels are nice and cool now. I probably have to adjust the brakes to grab a bit more but I'll do it on round two after changing the backing plates. The Bearing Buddy... ideas?
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Old 04-27-2017, 08:55 AM
Legolamb Legolamb is offline
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For your bearing buddy you can use a center punch on the inside edge of the buddy, make a couple of punches 90 degrees apart, so there is a small tit on the exterior edge that slides into your hub. Hope that makes sense.
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