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  #11  
Old 06-17-2018, 09:16 AM
bturner2's Avatar
bturner2 bturner2 is offline
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Boat: Maristar 200VRS w/ X2 Package, 2007, 310HP
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Good advice from Waterlogged. I bought all my cable and connectors from Genuine Dealz as well however I made all my cables.

Your installation looks a lot like mine did. The first thing I did with mine was to figure out what each cable is for, where it starts, how it's routed and the quality of the installation. For my project I had to remove and redo virtually everything the PO had installed. He used cheap speaker wire, cheap automotive grade cables, crimp connectors and vampire taps on everything he touched.

What really surprised me is that he had added a couple circuits that could have been routed through the dash switches that would have been circuit breaker protected but went directly to the battery instead. Worse yet the wires were not properly routed or supported which is why you basically need to inspect every aspect of every added cable by the PO.

So with what I found above I started by removing everything, getting rid of junk he added that I didn't want like a cell phone charger and a cheap battery charger he had wired to the battery. Next I looked at what could be combined from the stereo like the grounds and power feeds. I then routed the larger ground cables to the terminal blocks and the combine power feed cable to a circuit breaker sized to carry the current of the combined feeds.

Adding the dual battery set up also helped a lot. I was able to separate the starting and house circuits and connected each to posts on the battery switch. The power cables then were routed from the battery switch to the batteries. The other advantage of adding the battery switch is that you can completely disconnect the batteries from the circuits. When I'm done with my boat for the day I always turn off the power. It's an added safety item and also a theft deterrent as you have to know where the batteries are as well as the switch to start the boat.

After doing these actions my rat's nest was gone and what you see in the pictures was all that was left.
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  #12  
Old 06-17-2018, 09:27 AM
waterlogged882 waterlogged882 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bturner2 View Post
Good advice from Waterlogged. I bought all my cable and connectors from Genuine Dealz as well however I made all my cables.

Your installation looks a lot like mine did. The first thing I did with mine was to figure out what each cable is for, where it starts, how it's routed and the quality of the installation. For my project I had to remove and redo virtually everything the PO had installed. He used cheap speaker wire, cheap automotive grade cables, crimp connectors and vampire taps on everything he touched.

What really surprised me is that he had added a couple circuits that could have been routed through the dash switches that would have been circuit breaker protected but went directly to the battery instead. Worse yet the wires were not properly routed or supported which is why you basically need to inspect every aspect of every added cable by the PO.

So with what I found above I started by removing everything, getting rid of junk he added that I didn't want like a cell phone charger and a cheap battery charger he had wired to the battery. Next I looked at what could be combined from the stereo like the grounds and power feeds. I then routed the larger ground cables to the terminal blocks and the combine power feed cable to a circuit breaker sized to carry the current of the combined feeds.

Adding the dual battery set up also helped a lot. I was able to separate the starting and house circuits and connected each to posts on the battery switch. The power cables then were routed from the battery switch to the batteries. The other advantage of adding the battery switch is that you can completely disconnect the batteries from the circuits. When I'm done with my boat for the day I always turn off the power. It's an added safety item and also a theft deterrent as you have to know where the batteries are as well as the switch to start the boat.

After doing these actions my rat's nest was gone and what you see in the pictures was all that was left.
+1 ^^^
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  #13  
Old 06-17-2018, 10:41 AM
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JimN JimN is offline
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Originally Posted by SpokaneSteve View Post
Always glad I post here so I can learn more.....

So, it sounds like what I need is a distribution block. Is there one folks could recommend?

Is there a distribution block that has the fuses built in so I can get rid of the in-line fuses?

Is there a website or go-by I can read so I don't waste you all's time ?

I appreciate all the help - just trying to get this wired up correctly - I'll take a picture tonight.

Thanks much! Steve.
Parts Express has all of the parts you need- heat shrink terminals, wire, split loom tubing, distribution blocks, breakers, fuses- no batteries or battery cases, though.

Make sure you don't use fuses that are rated too high if a device doesn't have a fuse of its own- the ones at the battery can be larger since they're used to protect the boat and passengers, but ON or AT the device, it should be sized to protect the device in a worst-case scenario.

If the devices don't draw a lot of current, you can use one breaker for all of them-

>>>>>Device A slot------------------->+ terminal
Battery>>>Breaker>>>Distribution Block>>>>>Device B slot------------------->+ terminal
>>>>>Device C slot------------------->+ terminal
>>>>>Device D slot------------------->+ terminal

Add the value of the fuses on the equipment and use a breaker or fuse that's about 20% larger (I prefer breakers because you don't need to have replacements).

You can place the distribution block near the area where the equipment lives- there's no need to run four pieces of 4 ga cable. Whatever size you use for the +, use the same for the - and and consider going one size larger for the cable if you think other accessories might be added later.
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  #14  
Old 06-19-2018, 03:32 PM
SpokaneSteve SpokaneSteve is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2014
Boat: 2007 X1
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I think I'm getting there

Hello all:

So I am thinking I can build by system around this.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...=ATVPDKIKX0DER

According to Blue Sea, the indicate that it is specifically rated for stero amplifiers with the MIDA/AMI fuses.

What are people's thoughts on adding a switch and/or fuse between the battery and the fuse block?

I appreciate all the advice here. Thanks, Steve.
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  #15  
Old 06-20-2018, 09:43 AM
bturner2's Avatar
bturner2 bturner2 is offline
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Blue Seas makes great marine products so I wouldn't fault you there. The question I have is just how many additional circuits do you have going to the battery? The next question would be why?

The Stereo itself should have an in line fuse so if that's one circuit you don't need another fuse for it. Doing so just adds another place to cause issues when troubleshooting.

If you're running amps, the feeds can be combined (as described in my precious posts) and protected by a re-settable marine breaker. The key here is re-settable as apposed to one and done.

Past these two circuits and possibly a bilge pump what else do you have going to the battery?

You've got to figure this out first before doing anything else unless you're set on adding a sub block. Avoid this if possible as once again you're just adding another source of problems should you need to trouble shoot an issue later. With electrical using the KISS design method (Keep It Simple Stupid) is the best approach.

I know this isn't fun but go back to the boat and figure out what all you have there. If any of it was added by a previous owner I would again highly recommend evaluating the installation before doing anything else. Things you should be looking for include.....

Were marine rated materials (tinned wire, connectors, inline fuse links etc.) used? I've seen wire nuts, vampire taps and balls of black tape used in bad installations.
Were the wires routed through wiring looms, cable paths or supported but cushion clamps?
Were the proper types of cable used for power? I've seen speaker cable used to power electronics in multiple bad installations.

And the list just goes on and on. Building on someone else's junk installation will only perpetuate a bad situation. I mean really, how good could the installation be if they ran all the wires directly to the battery???

At this point I'm really curious as to what kind of junk as been added.
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