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Old 10-27-2017, 04:19 PM
Tuberski Tuberski is offline
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Boat: Maristar 225v 1998, lt1
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98' Maristar 225v LT1 Starter

Hey guys, in a dilemma and need some advice. What is a reasonable cost for a new starter for the LT1 engine on a Maristar 225 and how difficult is it for someone who just replaced the alternator and prayed that was the issue. (It was not)
I was quoted $400 and honestly the even number is bothering me. They say it would be for a marine starter and they are not able to quote auto parts due to insurance. (which I get).
They also want $225 to winterize it. So what's your vote / advice?

Bite the bullet drop the $400 and $225 and eat Ramen like college.
Get auto part starter for $??? and DIY and DIY winter
Or just winterize and deal with starter in the spring

Cheers,
Confused in Charlotte,
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Old 10-27-2017, 06:18 PM
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Endurance Endurance is offline
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No how no way should you put an automotive starter on your boat. Just don't. But even though you need a marine starter, you don't have to buy it at a marina. My go-to parts supplier for something like this is Discount Inboard Marine. www.skidim.com You could also have a local alternator and starter shop rebuild your marine starter.

Before you replace or rebuild another part on your boat, you might want to test a few things. For starters (no pun intended) you will want to pull your battery and have your local Autozone, Pep Boys, or O'Reilly check it for you. If that checks out, I would next do the same thing with the starter. Even though an automotive store can't sell you a marine starter, they can still test one for you if you ask nicely.

I always winterize my own boat, but a DIY winterizing might or might not be in your wheelhouse. I start by checking to see if I'm due for an oil change. If I am, fall is a nice time to do it. There was a time when the tradition was to always change oil in the fall, but today's oils are so good that the "always change in the fall" thinking is a little outdated IMHO. Next, you add fuel stabilizer to your gas. It's best if you do that on the lake so the waves can help it mix in your tank, but you kind of have to work within the constraints you have. Next step is to fog the air intake. You can buy a spray can of engine fogger or use a product like Seafoam. Better yet (in my opinion, again) is to use a fuel stabilizer made by Starbrite that is both a fuel stabilizer and an anticorrosive product that eliminates the need for fogging. You have to run your engine to get the Starbrite into your engine cylinders, but you would also have to run it to to fog also. If you run out of the water, you would do that either with tool called a "fake a lake" or by removing the water pickup hose from one end of your transmission cooler and stuffing your garden hose down your intake.

Once you're done with the oil change, fuel stabilizing, and fogging, you can get to the draining that some will call winterization. An LT-1 should have six places to drain. Spots 1 and 2 are on the sides of the block. One of those should have a knock sensor; the other is a plug. Spots 3 and 4 are your two exhaust manifolds. Older MasterCrafts have a plug on each exhaust manifold. They like to corrode into place. Newer MasterCrafts have two garden hoses that you just unscrew to drain the manifolds. Spots 1, 2, 3, and 4 should all give you a good gush of water when you pull the plugs or undo the hoses. If they don't give a good gush, you need to stick a wire in the open hole to clear any debris or corrosion that is blocking the hole.

Spot 5 is the "J" hose on the bottom of your recirculating water pump. You undo the hose and straighten out the "J" to drain it. Spot 6 is the hose that attaches to your raw water pump at the front of your engine (which is, perversely, at the back of the boat on a V-drive boat like yours). If you don't know when you last changed your raw water impeller, you should pull it this fall then install a new one in the spring. If you remove the raw water impeller, you don't have to remove the hose at spot 6.

In addition to your engine, you need to drain your heater and shower if you have them. The shower is easy -- just turn on the shower for a few minutes after the engine is drained. For most heaters, you need to remove the hose that feeds the heater core and blow in the end of it (with your mouth, not a compressor) until you clear all the water out of the heater core. I say "most heaters" because the heater core in my boat is high enough that it drains itself. But when in doubt, blow it out.

Some boat owners and some shops next add a few gallons of RV anti-freeze at this point then drain again. I call that not having confidence in your draining. But others will argue that there is some admittedly modest corrosion protection from antifreeze and that you can buy a lot of RV anti-freeze for the cost of just one engine block. Both are reasonable views.

If your local shop is charging $225 for the full winterization I have described, I would call it a good price. Please don't take this the wrong way, but if you would even consider putting an automotive starter on your boat, a DIY winterization might not be for you. But this thread, a talk with Discount Inboard Marine, and a few YouTube videos make this all pretty do-able.

I will attach pictures of the Starbrite and the Fake-A-Lake for what they're worth.
Attached Images
  

Last edited by Endurance; 10-27-2017 at 08:06 PM.
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Old 10-27-2017, 07:24 PM
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mikeg205 mikeg205 is offline
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you should be able to change the starter - should be top mounted if i recall correctly. But plus one on having it checked.

top mount https://www.bakesonline.com/starter-...arine-new.html $235 or http://www.skidim.com/STARTER-RH-305...info/RA122008/

to winterize there's a checklist if you decided to do it... what does mechanic do for 225
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Old 10-27-2017, 10:11 PM
curver900 curver900 is offline
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well I hope he uses lube... if it is $225 and it includes trans and oil and filter change that might be a reasonable number, if just pulling out the water plugs and the water impeller... probably need more lube...

$400 for a starter would be reasonable as well if it has a warranty.. it is at least an hour of someones time... and if the part is new not a reman...

I am in the camp of doing it yourself pull the water plugs.. if needed change the oil, if no hurry just let the oil drip out over a weekend.. That is what i do .. just let it drain then fill it back up it takes a L-O-N-G time.. save up $$$$... then next spring you can test, if bad battery then get a new one.. good for the summer, if starter get a reman.. takes all of 2 hours even if you don't know what you are doing... that leaves you allot of beer money...

Money or time... you always have one but never enough of the other!
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Old 10-28-2017, 01:50 AM
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mikeg205 mikeg205 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by curver900 View Post
well I hope he uses lube... if it is $225 and it includes trans and oil and filter change that might be a reasonable number, if just pulling out the water plugs and the water impeller... probably need more lube...

$400 for a starter would be reasonable as well if it has a warranty.. it is at least an hour of someones time... and if the part is new not a reman...

I am in the camp of doing it yourself pull the water plugs.. if needed change the oil, if no hurry just let the oil drip out over a weekend.. That is what i do .. just let it drain then fill it back up it takes a L-O-N-G time.. save up $$$$... then next spring you can test, if bad battery then get a new one.. good for the summer, if starter get a reman.. takes all of 2 hours even if you don't know what you are doing... that leaves you allot of beer money...

Money or time... you always have one but never enough of the other!

you got that right!
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  #6  
Old 10-28-2017, 08:40 AM
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bturner2 bturner2 is offline
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Both prices could be good or bad depending on parts used on the starter and the procedure/parts being used on the winterization. It's always cheaper to do it yourself (if you do it right) so comparing what you could do it for versus what a shop will charge is only valid if you are capable of doing said work. If you think you're getting taken by this shop, call around and get a couple quick estimates in your area to get a better feel for the going rate. The starter is pretty straight forward but be sure to ask if the part being replaced is new or re-manufactured (the later can be a real wild card though as not all re-manufactured part are equal). Same goes for the winterization, ask what exactly they do in the process and what materials are being used.

Boats are expensive to maintain and shops have to make a profit to stay open. I recently paid $1100 to have my rudder port and rudder replaced (including parts). Based on what I've done with boats in the past and knowing what I know about the steering system I'm confident I could have done this job myself and probably saved $400 - $500 of that bill but I honestly did not want to stand on my head, crawl in the locker for an hour or struggle with sealant trying to pry the rudder port out. While I consider this work was very expensive I'm good with the service as I certainly didn't want to do it. Seems the older I get the more I'm willing to pay someone else to do these shall we say, less than fun projects.
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  #7  
Old 10-28-2017, 09:17 AM
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JimN JimN is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tuberski View Post
Hey guys, in a dilemma and need some advice. What is a reasonable cost for a new starter for the LT1 engine on a Maristar 225 and how difficult is it for someone who just replaced the alternator and prayed that was the issue. (It was not)
I was quoted $400 and honestly the even number is bothering me. They say it would be for a marine starter and they are not able to quote auto parts due to insurance. (which I get).
They also want $225 to winterize it. So what's your vote / advice?

Bite the bullet drop the $400 and $225 and eat Ramen like college.
Get auto part starter for $??? and DIY and DIY winter
Or just winterize and deal with starter in the spring

Cheers,
Confused in Charlotte,
That's a ridiculously common starter- have the original one rebuilt by a good auto electric shop. You could get one from the place I use in the Milwaukee area and have it shipped to you for less than the prices you showed. DO NOT use a car starter- it doesn't have spark suppression like a marine starter.

BTW- if the battery died completely and you began to have electrical problems, it's probably from jump-starting the engine without fully recharging the battery. NEVER jump start a dead battery and run the engine- neither the starter nor the alternator are designed to be used when the voltage drops so low. Cranking an engine until the battery dies burns the contacts in the solenoid and can damage the winding.
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Old 11-02-2017, 11:44 PM
Tuberski Tuberski is offline
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Join Date: Oct 2017
Boat: Maristar 225v 1998, lt1
Location: Southeast
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All great advice and why this page was my first stop. Thanks to all. Had the shop replace starter and was ecstatic to hear that engine crank and just want to be put in gear.
1 year parts and labor warranty included.
Sad to then winterize and put away but found a friend to walk me through the steps and all went well.
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  #9  
Old 11-03-2017, 06:48 PM
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Shaun R Shaun R is offline
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Late to the party but...
https://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk...ad.php?t=66170
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