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  #11  
Old 06-10-2013, 09:24 PM
kevkan kevkan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madcityskier View Post
Grease up the carpet and watch the boat slide side to side on the curves. Seen it, no thanks. Also, the winch on my 85 pulls the front end down more than forward. You can back till the coupler is in the water and drift it on, or you can drive it. The winch does not move the boat forward the last few inches. On different ramps, your results may vary.
I had to pull my 85 out of the water once or maybe twice when it wouldn't start. The winch is to hold the boat on the trailer, not to pull it on. You've got to get really deep to float on. Obviously it was intended to "power load". I sure don't miss standing between the truck and boat holding that lock bar to fit it over the bow eye at just the right moment. But once on, that boat wasn't coming off! An FYI: Do not lock the winch until you are out of the water! (read owners manual) I locked mine once on a really steep ramp, such that the rear of boat was not resting on bunks, and broke my winch cable when I pulled out. Lucky it was just the cable that broke!

I'm pretty sure the current trailers are also meant to "power load". What good is a Boat Buddy if you are getting out to winch the boat on the trailer? I can load my boat in a short amount of time without gunning the engine, with minimal effort, and no one stepping out on the ramp.
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  #12  
Old 06-10-2013, 09:29 PM
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sully sully is offline
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Please don't power load.
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  #13  
Old 06-10-2013, 09:47 PM
kevkan kevkan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sully View Post
Please don't power load.
Please define "power load", because maybe I'm not understanding the term. My MC trailer manual states "drive your boat onto the trailer at a slow pace." Is that "power loading"?
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  #14  
Old 06-10-2013, 09:58 PM
pap pap is offline
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Originally Posted by cal69 View Post
You mean you can't do this at your local boat ramp?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_bLAiLgPvJc
Not with my boat (or my last one) on my lake. It is impossible. As I said, if you back in far enough to get the boat to come up without a LOT of powerloading, then the bow goes UNDER the roller and you will destroy the boat. Pull up far enough to get the angle right for the bow to go over the roller and now you've either got a lot of powerloading or winching or both.

Maybe smaller ski boats load differently, IDK, but both 21-24 foot wakeboard boats I've owned have this same problem.

Or there is a trick that I've not been shown/figured out yet. I've tried changing a bit the height of the trailer ball, but without going extreme (it's level normally) it doesn't seem to make any difference.
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  #15  
Old 06-10-2013, 10:02 PM
grizzly grizzly is offline
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  #16  
Old 06-10-2013, 11:22 PM
88 PS190 88 PS190 is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevkan View Post
Please define "power load", because maybe I'm not understanding the term. My MC trailer manual states "drive your boat onto the trailer at a slow pace." Is that "power loading"?
The definition that the DNR will use when writing up the ticket is having your boat in gear on the trailer.

This includes throttling the boat up the bunks, leaving the boat in gear while you hitch the bow strap/eye or as some seem to do, assisting the family mini-van up the ramp with judiciously applied power.

All of which tend to move the sand/small rock that is usually at the end of the concrete slab into a big pile which your prop hits when you back off the trailer.

Power loading is perfectly fine when you're on a nice long deep ramp where the concrete stabilizes the soil and has no impact from your prop...

But then again, those ramps do not exist when the DNR is involved, but more likely at the private marina where you probably paid to launch.
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  #17  
Old 06-11-2013, 01:56 AM
jdnsx jdnsx is offline
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Driving the boat all the way onto your trailer with slightly more than idle power is perfectly fine and does no damage to ANY ramp.

"RACING YOUR ENGINE" while on the trailer is NOT OKAY.

"The DNR recognizes that some boaters are accustomed to power loading. However, it is preferable that boaters do not race their engines while on the boat ramp. Slightly more than idle speed should be all that is necessary to load and/or unload the boat. The best practice is for boaters to refrain from power loading and use the winch to load and unload their boat."
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  #18  
Old 06-11-2013, 02:01 AM
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thatsmrmastercraft thatsmrmastercraft is online now
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There is a huge difference between power-loading and loading with a drive-on trailer. Learning how to drive onto the trailer with the correct amount of speed to bring the boat onto the trailer correctly takes a fair amount of time. When done properly, this does not violate DNR requirements, as forward momentum is what puts the boat on the trailer.

The problem comes in when rules change which affect previous design. Stars & stripes boats, and a lot of the newer MC and other brand inboards were designed to power-load. Those trailers that are designed to be able to winch on a boat have the winch in the same horizontal plane as the bow eye. When the winch is mounted way below this plane, there is no way to winch a boat onto the trailer. Since there is no provision to grandfather older inboards the ability to power-load while requiring newer boats to winch on, it is upon the boat owner to modify his trailer to allow the boat to be winched on. Typically this means changing the height of the winch stand.

This doesn't require one to be a rocket surgeon to understand, but it can be a pain in the arse.
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  #19  
Old 06-11-2013, 07:05 AM
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madcityskier madcityskier is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thatsmrmastercraft View Post
There is a huge difference between power-loading and loading with a drive-on trailer. Learning how to drive onto the trailer with the correct amount of speed to bring the boat onto the trailer correctly takes a fair amount of time. When done properly, this does not violate DNR requirements, as forward momentum is what puts the boat on the trailer.

The problem comes in when rules change which affect previous design. Stars & stripes boats, and a lot of the newer MC and other brand inboards were designed to power-load. Those trailers that are designed to be able to winch on a boat have the winch in the same horizontal plane as the bow eye. When the winch is mounted way below this plane, there is no way to winch a boat onto the trailer. Since there is no provision to grandfather older inboards the ability to power-load while requiring newer boats to winch on, it is upon the boat owner to modify his trailer to allow the boat to be winched on. Typically this means changing the height of the winch stand.

This doesn't require one to be a rocket surgeon to understand, but it can be a pain in the arse.
This does change the way the boat rests on the trailer, as it was designed to be held down by the winch rather than forward. Thanks, but no thanks.
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