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  #11  
Old 04-23-2013, 06:58 PM
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j.mccreight@hotmail.com j.mccreight@hotmail.com is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SP Maristar View Post
What is the consensus on balancing trailer tires? I don't think my current Marathons are.
I always balance mine, trailer tires are notoriously bad about not being truly round.

I just put 6 tires on this last week and all 6 tires took more than 6oz to balance out. 16" wheels
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Last edited by j.mccreight@hotmail.com; 04-23-2013 at 07:08 PM.
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  #12  
Old 04-23-2013, 07:58 PM
Cloaked Cloaked is offline
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Originally Posted by SP Maristar View Post
What is the consensus on balancing trailer tires? I don't think my current Marathons are.
Always................ why would one not balance a wheel for road use?
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  #13  
Old 04-23-2013, 08:58 PM
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My factory ones have no wheel weights and more than one tire store that i called shopping prices asked if i wanted them balanced.
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  #14  
Old 04-23-2013, 09:30 PM
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I know this is blasphemy, but on my tandem trailer I run passenger tires, P205/70-14 that are rated at about 1300 lbs when pumped up to maximum pressure, which is 44 PSI. The boat/trailer weighs about 4300 lbs. Since they're tandem, I have plenty of stability. Since they're passenger tires I don't have to worry about speed ratings (I never go over 70 mph anyway), and they're considerably cheaper than ST tires.

I wouldn't recommend doing this with a single axle trailer which would probably benefit from ST-rated tires
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  #15  
Old 04-23-2013, 10:34 PM
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I always balance trailer tires. If you don't, they tend to bounce and cup. That produces a lot of heat which kills tires.

As far as running passenger tires, that is what is used in the low profile trailers, but XL tires are used which have a stiffer sidewall than a P-metric passenger tire. Sidewall flexing generates heat, which, as I have said, kills tires.

Running tires below their maximum tire pressure also allows more sidewall flexing, which....
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Tandem Axle Trailer Special
Includes: 4 T07 wheels, 4 ST205/75R14 Kenda
Loadstar KR03 Radial tires, mount and balance
Free Delivery


ALUMINUM WHEEL AND TIRE PACKAGES
SINGLE AXLE 14" PACKAGE STARTING AT $369
SINGLE AXLE 15" PACKAGE STARTING AT $439
TANDEM AXLE 14" PACKAGE STARTING AT $649
LED lights, Spare Tire Carriers, Chrome & Powder Coated Lug Nuts
GOLF CART TIRES & WHEELS

PM me or email tiresplease@gmail.com
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  #16  
Old 04-23-2013, 11:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thatsmrmastercraft View Post
As far as running passenger tires, that is what is used in the low profile trailers, but XL tires are used which have a stiffer sidewall than a P-metric passenger tire. Sidewall flexing generates heat, which, as I have said, kills tires.
Typically trailers have much more side to side sway, therefore more lateral pressure on the sidewalls than on a passenger vehicle, hence the recommendation for specific tires for trailers. Not that passenger tires might work for someone for years if they only do a short tow back and forth to a lake. But with a $30k boat sitting on the trailer, the extra couple hundred dollars every few years for trailer-specific tires is worth the piece of mind.

Consider also, if a tire ever did blow and cause damage as a result, I think the insurance company could get ornery if an investigation showed passenger tires were installed on the trailer.
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  #17  
Old 04-24-2013, 10:37 AM
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Quote:
Typically trailers have much more side to side sway...
I think that statement has to be qualified. A travel trailer, or any trailer carrying a heavy load with a high center of gravity probably is more susceptible to side loads, crosswinds, etc. The gunwales of my boat are about 4 1/2 feet off the ground, it's low profile and not going to catch a lot of wind. I'm certain that the center of gravity of my boat and trailer is lower than the Tahoe that's pulling it.

So I agree that some trailers are more susceptible to side sway, but some are not. I'm comfortable that the four passenger tires on my trailer, pumped up to the maximum pressure of 44 psi, are providing good lateral stability. As I mentioned, I wouldn't try this if it was single axle trailer with only two tires.

I had to add that ST-rated Goodyear Marathons haven't had a stellar reputation for being safe and reliable.
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  #18  
Old 04-24-2013, 01:34 PM
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Hogwild Hogwild is offline
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I went with some Gladiators, but probably don't have enough miles on them to comment on durability.
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  #19  
Old 04-24-2013, 03:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hogwild View Post
I went with some Gladiators, but probably don't have enough miles on them to comment on durability.
__________________
Peter

Tandem Axle Trailer Special
Includes: 4 T07 wheels, 4 ST205/75R14 Kenda
Loadstar KR03 Radial tires, mount and balance
Free Delivery


ALUMINUM WHEEL AND TIRE PACKAGES
SINGLE AXLE 14" PACKAGE STARTING AT $369
SINGLE AXLE 15" PACKAGE STARTING AT $439
TANDEM AXLE 14" PACKAGE STARTING AT $649
LED lights, Spare Tire Carriers, Chrome & Powder Coated Lug Nuts
GOLF CART TIRES & WHEELS

PM me or email tiresplease@gmail.com
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  #20  
Old 04-24-2013, 05:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Miss Rita View Post
I think that statement has to be qualified. A travel trailer, or any trailer carrying a heavy load with a high center of gravity probably is more susceptible to side loads, crosswinds, etc. The gunwales of my boat are about 4 1/2 feet off the ground, it's low profile and not going to catch a lot of wind. I'm certain that the center of gravity of my boat and trailer is lower than the Tahoe that's pulling it.

So I agree that some trailers are more susceptible to side sway, but some are not. I'm comfortable that the four passenger tires on my trailer, pumped up to the maximum pressure of 44 psi, are providing good lateral stability. As I mentioned, I wouldn't try this if it was single axle trailer with only two tires.
My point was just that due to the inherent geometry between the tow vehicle and the trailer, there is a natural tendency for a trailer to sway to some degree. That is why tow vehicle length, trailer length, tongue weight, and leveling are so critical. It is for this reason that 5th wheel towing is preferable to hitch towing -- the overall geometry of having the tow point ahead of the rear axle makes for better stability.

Although a trailer may not physically be swaying that is not to say there are not side to side forces, which hopefully the tire-to-ground friction are overcoming at any given time. As you point out, these can be caused by side winds or passing trucks, but also in the absence of side wind -- varying road surfaces, driver steering maneuvers, speed changes, hills, etc. This is what heats up the sidewalls of the trailer tires. Granted, a double axle trailer provides greater stability. A four-wheeled steerable vehicle traveling at the same speed does not have the same lateral forces on the tires. Vehicles also have the advantage of dampened suspension which most trailers do not.

The problem is compounded nowadays I think with longer and heavier boats (necessitating longer trailers) and shorter-wheelbased SUV's (but powered and rated to tow heavier loads.)
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