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  #51  
Old 04-07-2013, 10:27 AM
tim79mc tim79mc is offline
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Join Date: May 2012
Boat: 1979 Stars & Stripes
Location: Northeast
Posts: 89
Cloaked- thanks for the thoughts. I put weep holes in the primary stringer at the lowest point, so all water in the hull will drain to this pump location. Very few spots where the water can get trapped - the only places are where the hull isn't flat (build up for skegs, pylon mount...)

I will look into a dripless packing system - you're right, now is the time to replace that if I ever do.

I will be putting a hatch over the bilge in its current location for maintenance and service.

The last pump was under the oil pan of the engine. What a PITA and it wasn't even pumping out the whole bilge.
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  #52  
Old 04-07-2013, 10:35 AM
tim79mc tim79mc is offline
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Join Date: May 2012
Boat: 1979 Stars & Stripes
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Update on plan for battery, cables and storage... I will put the battery in a plastic case and push this into a pocket above the floor and behind the observers seat. I plan to be able to lift the seat up to gain access to the bow and I can slide the battery case forward and remove the battery for servicing. The steering cable will go into the bilge in this same area. The throttle and transmission control cables will go into the bilge by the drivers' foot bulkhead - this will leave the whole middle of the bow open for access. Next, figure out where the ventilation duct will go - I'm thinking all of the way up front with some protective bulkhead around it.

Anyone have pics of front bow storage areas?
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  #53  
Old 04-07-2013, 05:44 PM
Cloaked Cloaked is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2004
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Location: Kingston,TN USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tim79mc View Post
Update on plan for battery, cables and storage... I will put the battery in a plastic case and push this into a pocket above the floor and behind the observers seat. I plan to be able to lift the seat up to gain access to the bow and I can slide the battery case forward and remove the battery for servicing. The steering cable will go into the bilge in this same area. The throttle and transmission control cables will go into the bilge by the drivers' foot bulkhead - this will leave the whole middle of the bow open for access. Next, figure out where the ventilation duct will go - I'm thinking all of the way up front with some protective bulkhead around it.

Anyone have pics of front bow storage areas?
Ventilation design (and probably federal marine standards) changes quite a bit from say.... 1979 - 1986 era, from there some changes.

The 79 has a vent opening across the bow and a hose that is placed into the basement via the port for the cables from the helm/throttle/gear shift. That vent hose was to provide thru-flow in the hull. The blower was placed in the rear (above the fuel cell right in the middle) as a discharge/blower, meeting the (then requirements and perceived safety) needs for the boat builder.

Fast forward a few years and the 91-94 era. I had a 93 that had similar ventilation as the 79, but the blower was placed in the engine compartment just in front of the starter on some cheesy mounting bracket. A vent hose is connected from the blower (running adjacent to the starboard exhaust hose) to a rear discharge outlet. There is also a short open -ended hose in the rear to satisfy the argument of fumes from the fuel cell in a confined space, exiting through the same discharge vent port. The blower itself (pickup) then would serve as ventilation for the engine compartment. Now both perceived confined spaces are vented.

I think if you follow the original 79 installation, you'll be OK. I may would be inclined to add two small vents in the engine cover just for the heck of it (safety), but your model did not have a lot of extensive ventilation components.

The 79s were open all up front, no bulkhead or kick panel (adjacent to the driver's left leg). Your creativity for that is all on you. Ski storage is nice if you have an organized space up front with some bulkhead or panel to segregate compartments. I used my kick panel (left side of the driver) to mount my dual battery and amp (on the port side of the panel adjacent to my left leg). That is what I would consider while you're there. Nothnig fancy is required. I used 3/4" builder grade plyboard and coated with epoxy resin, then a piece of matching carpet.

.
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Quote:
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..Some of you give a whole new meaning to the phrase "another @sshole with a Mastercraft."

RE: Thrall, Welcome to the club....
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Last edited by Cloaked; 04-07-2013 at 06:19 PM.
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  #54  
Old 04-21-2013, 11:15 PM
tim79mc tim79mc is offline
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Join Date: May 2012
Boat: 1979 Stars & Stripes
Location: Northeast
Posts: 89
thanks, cloaked. That's similar to what I'm thinking. I've been working on electrics since the last post, pulled all of the gauges out and polished the bezels, cleaned them up and they look great. Polished the helm and pulled the fake wood grain - that had always bothered me. Marine plywood for the floor has arrived.

I ran two conduits along the top of the starboard stringers- one along the secondary to the rear and one along the primary to the front engine mounts. This will let me get access to wiring much more easily than before and keep the wiring out of the bottom of the bilge. Ordered primary marine wire from genuinedealz - good pricing, fast service.

The bilge is pretty much done, so plywood cutting soon. I plan to add two wood rails to the inside of the primary stringers at the rear of the boat to provide a strong support for the removable floor panel that covers the prop shaft cavity. The previous floor sat half the primary stringer and had a lot of flex. I'll be stiffening that up in this build.

Docks and boats are starting to come out of hiding - time to prioritize the boat above kids and family : )
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  #55  
Old 04-22-2013, 04:49 PM
Cloaked Cloaked is offline
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Originally Posted by tim79mc View Post
thanks, cloaked. .......... Ordered primary marine wire from genuinedealz - good pricing, fast service.
I used them for my battery replacement / dual system. Good place for cable and connectors. I had then crimp and shrink all of my connections.

When you place the plastic battery boxes and lids in the boat, use old life jack buckles and straps for the lid tie-downs. Makes it much easier to use the buckle system for removal and reinstall of the lid, than the friction type system that comes with the box.

.
__________________
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Don't be a boot licker
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Hose picture (internal) http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/...68&postcount=8



Quote:
Originally Posted by Thrall View Post
..Some of you give a whole new meaning to the phrase "another @sshole with a Mastercraft."

RE: Thrall, Welcome to the club....
NEW SKINS in TN... Leading Edge Marine Interior

feedback on a TN company: http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/...ad.php?t=58767

.
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  #56  
Old 04-22-2013, 05:06 PM
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thatsmrmastercraft thatsmrmastercraft is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloaked View Post
I used them for my battery replacement / dual system. Good place for cable and connectors. I had then crimp and shrink all of my connections.

When you place the plastic battery boxes and lids in the boat, use old life jack buckles and straps for the lid tie-downs. Makes it much easier to use the buckle system for removal and reinstall of the lid, than the friction type system that comes with the box.

.
Great idea.
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  #57  
Old 04-28-2013, 02:16 AM
tim79mc tim79mc is offline
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Join Date: May 2012
Boat: 1979 Stars & Stripes
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A few more things off the checklist today. No pictures, as I kept working non-stop... sorry.

The swim platform is back on, new pitot pickups, connected. Exhaust mounts are installed - I custom cut a 2x4 to cradle the engine end of the mufflers, they had previously just be lying on the hull. I saw a post about how MC used to just put a rag under the mufflers - I can confirm this as I found a very old (and stinky) rag under the floor. This pass will be much better. Electrical conduit is installed front to back run and front to engine runs under the floor - easy to access and up high so they won't be in bilge water.

I also tackled the leaks in my engine- replacing multiple gaskets, raw water to block, water pump, fuel pump. They all needed it, water was always dripping and oil from the fuel pump.

I looked at my fuel system and have a question - the outlet from my tank is 1/4" (ID). I previously had 1/4" line all the way to the pump, or at least I thought.. The pump has a 3/8" barb and everything I see on skidim is 3/8 or bigger. Should i be going with 3/8" from the tank?

Fuel tank is cleaned up, fuel sender replacement is on order- I tried rebuilding the old one, but no success...

I need recommendations for carpet. Any good experiences?
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  #58  
Old 04-29-2013, 12:37 AM
tim79mc tim79mc is offline
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Join Date: May 2012
Boat: 1979 Stars & Stripes
Location: Northeast
Posts: 89
Started cutting pieces for the floor and ordered a bunch of parts today. Measured 4 times, cut once, prayed and thankfully fit was spot on. At $100/sheet for this marine ply, I'm not ready to screw up...

I test fit the engine and it looks good. Made sure I understood the clearances needed for floor / exhaust, etc. I did find that the cradles I made for the exhaust were just a little bit too high, so modded those. Good to find before I installed the floor.

Warm enough for shorts and skiing today if the boat were ready...
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  #59  
Old 07-04-2013, 12:11 AM
tim79mc tim79mc is offline
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I've been busy. Actually had the boat in the water last weekend. Running! I had the floor plywood out to make sure everything worked properly before I epoxied everything down, but it is running and I'm happy about that. July 4th holiday should be the last push to get carpet down, install pylon and ski. I might not have a spotter's seat, but most of the work will have been done. It's only been more than a year since I've had the boat in the water...
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  #60  
Old 07-04-2013, 12:21 AM
tim79mc tim79mc is offline
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Join Date: May 2012
Boat: 1979 Stars & Stripes
Location: Northeast
Posts: 89
Lessons learned

Many, many people have helped me learn from this forum, so I'm going to make sure I return that favor in posting what I learned about restoring my boat.

I will never do this again. It has been an incredible amount of time and effort and I'm missing out on other things I'd like to be doing. That said, I have become much more knowledgeable and experienced and I will be very happy that I restored "Old Blue" once I'm finished. But, did it once, don't need to do it again.

Other things I've learned:

- Planning slows things down. Not planning makes a lot of wrong things happen, really slowing things down.
- Epoxy sticks to everything. I have four pairs of shorts that don't fold the way they used to.
- Tyvek keeps the itches away. It's hot, but very effective.
- Nothing in a boat is straight. Curves suck when laying glass, carpet and beveling pieces to mate to the hull.
- Engines don't usually leak oil. Mine had always leaked. Now it doesn't, because I fixed it.
- Taking the engine out is a PITA, but makes working on things SO much easier.
- I learned to like alcohol and acetone for cleaning. I'd never used so much cleaner on a job.
- Wet sanding rocks. I can't wait to finish the rest of the hull.
- Buy good stuff. Good heat shrink, real ring lugs, good epoxy... makes the job so much easier.
- Filleting is really important. Fiberglass does not bend well and needs support.
- Fiberglass is forgiving. I screwed up many times. Grind and redo. Nice.

Alright, now for some pics
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