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  #131  
Old 03-18-2013, 11:50 PM
Scot Scot is offline
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Originally Posted by TRBenj View Post
That $250 quote you got on the shaft doesnt include the coupler, does it? The $300-350 for the dual taper does. I have not found a new price on a single taper shaft + coupler that was lower than the dual taper system when using the appropriate discounts. Really, its a no brainer.

Again, with grooving on the shaft, I would not run it as-is. I would not invest a dime in trying to fix it. Just replace it, or risk ruining a day on the water, along with losing your prop, if it breaks.

Good job on getting the strut lined up (I assume you lined it up to the point where the shaft spun freely and was not sagging under its own weight?). Sometimes it takes a bit of coercion to get it there.
My price on the shaft was using my original coupler, so thats mainly where the savings comes from.

As for the shaft, we are talking about a few thousandths of run-out where it rides on the bushings. It sits pretty snug in the strut. Is that really that bad? I have ruled out trying to fix this one, its either runable or being replaced. Its obviously taken many years to get to this point and running this way for quite a while.

As for your input on the strut alignment, I want to make sure we're on the same page so I get it right. My strut alignment was done with the shaft not coupled to the trans. I positioned it so that it rides as close to center as possible in the log and plan to align the motor/trans to where the shaft rides free and centered in the strut. This seemed to make the most sense to me since the log was the only good reference point I had for my alignment considering the motor, trans, and strut were all off.

Also, when I had the trans out the shaft would easily pop out by pushing forward out of the strut and then pulling it out of the log. Now it can only go back and it binds against the rudder when it goes that way. Am I missing something here or is there an easy way to get it out? It was the same way before my manipulation of the strut.
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  #132  
Old 03-19-2013, 10:02 AM
TRBenj TRBenj is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scot View Post
My price on the shaft was using my original coupler, so thats mainly where the savings comes from.
Id be hesitant to reuse the old coupler with a new shaft. You may want to consider getting the coupling refaced with the new shaft so you know the fit is tight and the flange isnt warped.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scot View Post
As for the shaft, we are talking about a few thousandths of run-out where it rides on the bushings. It sits pretty snug in the strut. Is that really that bad? I have ruled out trying to fix this one, its either runable or being replaced. Its obviously taken many years to get to this point and running this way for quite a while.
I dont know what the allowable spec for runout is, but by the way you previously described it, it sounded bad. If its enough to catch a finger nail on, I would not run it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scot View Post
As for your input on the strut alignment, I want to make sure we're on the same page so I get it right. My strut alignment was done with the shaft not coupled to the trans.
Correct.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scot View Post
I positioned it so that it rides as close to center as possible in the log
By this I assume you mean that you located the strut such that the shaft spun freely when centered in the log. If you located the strut while the shaft was allowed to sag under its own weight or otherwise forced to the center of the log (the rubber strut bushing allows for some "squish") then that is not correct.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scot View Post
and plan to align the motor/trans to where the shaft rides free and centered in the strut. This seemed to make the most sense to me since the log was the only good reference point I had for my alignment considering the motor, trans, and strut were all off.
It sounds like you did it correctly- just confirming. You want to align the powertrain to where the shaft spins freely. This may or may not be when the shaft is centered in the log. That is the appropriate reference point when aligning the strut- the goal would be to get the shaft perfectly centered in the log where it spins freely, but a little bit off here is fine (so long as its not rubbing the log). The important thing is powertrain to strut alignment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scot View Post
Also, when I had the trans out the shaft would easily pop out by pushing forward out of the strut and then pulling it out of the log. Now it can only go back and it binds against the rudder when it goes that way. Am I missing something here or is there an easy way to get it out? It was the same way before my manipulation of the strut.
I am not totally following whats going on here. Are you saying that due to the new strut location, the shaft hits the rudder when trying to install/remove from the rear?
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  #133  
Old 03-21-2013, 12:58 AM
Scot Scot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TRBenj View Post
I am not totally following whats going on here. Are you saying that due to the new strut location, the shaft hits the rudder when trying to install/remove from the rear?
Correct. And it was that way before too, and at that point the misalignment actually would have made it easier to pass the shaft. And I was hesitant to post that and hear that my strut must be off, but I am pretty confident in my strut to log alignment it rides pretty damn centered in the log when you pick it up and relieve binding/sag. And looking at the alignment of the strut mount and rudder mount holes they just look too close to possibly slide a 1 1/8" shaft past the rudder with everything lined up. Is this common?

Getting close to testing the tranny. I know it's taking forever but considering the small window of time I have to work on this thing each day I am doing okay. Got the alignment "eyeball" close which is much better than the shop did last year. Will finish tomorrow.

It blows my mind that I spent so much time on my stringers and blindly trusted my local shop to "align" everything when they dropped my motor back in. I guess it was the combination of project burnout and time to get on the water.

As for the runout on the shaft- not at all worried about shaft failure. Not that bad, at least I dont think. Just dont want vibration in my drivetrain after all the effort to get it back to normal. I also tend to be a little (a lot) OCD on my projects and it is a constant battle to decide if something is really worth replacing or not.
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  #134  
Old 03-21-2013, 09:59 AM
TRBenj TRBenj is offline
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I would have to have a pretty trusting relationship with a shop thats going to align my boat. I suspect most wont do it properly, or at all. Its not difficult- just time consuming... so definitely a good thing to tackle on your own. Sounds like youre closing in on it.

Ironic timing on your decision to reuse the shaft. Yesterday my buddy broke a 5 year old ARE (which is a pretty high grade of stainless, no less) on a boat that was perfectly aligned. Dinged up his brand new $$$ Acme prop in the process. Shafts can and do break- so just be aware that youre reusing that shaft at a risk. His engine is a good bit healthier than stock, which surely contributed to the premature failure, but that shaft was perfect not that long ago.
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  #135  
Old 03-22-2013, 01:16 AM
Scot Scot is offline
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Transmission works, forward and reverse. Cant stop it with my hand at idle and no dirty neutral at all. We'll see how it is under load, could be a whole different story.

Getting the final alignment done over the next night or two (I know, I'm slow, but I'm busy) . There is virtually no shaft play at the prop end despite the shaft wear.

One reason I am hesitant to replace the shaft if not absolutely necessary is that I am running in shallow and somewhat unfamiliar waters. Dont plan on hitting a sandbar, but if I do I would rather do it with an old shaft than a brand new one.

The lower Colorado River is not like my good old lakes back home, but this is home now so I will make do. I'm certainly not gonna buy a jet. I see wakeboard boats out there all the time, if they can get by I should be able to.
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  #136  
Old 04-06-2013, 10:58 PM
Scot Scot is offline
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chatter from reduction unit

So everything is working well as far as function. No slip, no dirty neutral, smooth and solid shifts in forward and reverse.

Before I tore this thing apart I was hearing a chatter coming from somewhere back there. After my analysis I decided it was most likely the shaft riding on the log (it wore a groove in it if you don't recall).

However, I am still hearing it. One thing that crossed my mind was the vibration damper, but it just doesnt seem like that.

When I got it home today I pulled the floor up again and uncoupled the shaft. It makes the same sound in gear. By feel and sound it seems to be concentrated in the reduction unit. Only makes the noise in gear. The coupler gets hot when running in gear (uncoupled), not sure if it should but doesn't seem like it.

Any ideas? Bad reduction gears? They seemed to spin smoothly when I had it apart. If it was an actual "tranny" issue it seems like it would have some performance issues which it doesn't. One thought is poor lubing of the rear unit. Thinking about pulling the reduction housing and seeing if fluid drains.
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  #137  
Old 04-07-2013, 04:11 PM
Scot Scot is offline
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After reading up on other threads the symptoms seem to point to a worn damper plate. Others have even described the noise as seeming like it is in the back portion of the tranny.

Gonna get a new one ordered and slide the tranny back again.

Has anyone come up with a good way of sliding the tranny back without using a lift?
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  #138  
Old 04-08-2013, 12:38 PM
TRBenj TRBenj is offline
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Oh geez, you didnt replace the damper while you had the trans off for a rebuild? For the minimal cost ($80 for a BW damper) that should always be a given.

Somebody on this thread should have piped in earlier!
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  #139  
Old 04-09-2013, 01:06 AM
Scot Scot is offline
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I know, bad move. I knew better, too.
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  #140  
Old 04-10-2013, 12:37 AM
Scot Scot is offline
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The right damper?

Got the tranny pulled again and damper off.

Now concerned I may not have ordered the right one. The one I took off is triangular and takes 2 bolts per ear. The one I ordered looks like all of the ones I found for a 10-17 trans and ford small block. It's also triangular but more "star" shaped and takes 1 bolt per ear. None of the other holes on my flywheel seem to be threaded. Should this new damper bolt up?

Here's what came off.
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