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  #71  
Old 01-03-2013, 12:20 AM
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XtwentyNot XtwentyNot is offline
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Great thread! I'm from the built not bought camp and have learned the only way to be able to do everything yourself is to roll up your sleeves and go for it.
I find that, while from an hourly standpoint, some of my projects are ludicrous, the satisfaction I get from doing things with my own two hands far outweighs the time I invest into them.
That said take the windshield and snaps off already (is there am echo in here ).
And I re read just to clarify, you did plan on gel coat work. Guess what? Do it yourself! No way you won't be able to pull it off. Get something fiberglass to practice on, whatever it takes. Spraying gel coat is relatively simple, watch YouTube, ask here, and go for it. Re gel as little or as much as you want. But no way you don't spray it yourself! You're already doing all the hard stuff in the prep!
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  #72  
Old 01-03-2013, 08:38 AM
TRBenj TRBenj is online now
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Correct Craft uses an epoxy/vinyl blend resin (AME 5000).

The prep for paint and gel is the same. Labor on the gel will be higher after its shot, as it will require a bit more time to smooth it out than paint... but this is a moot point if youre doing the work yourself. Painting the boat will result in an inferior finish, and you'd need to do the whole boat. You can do spot repairs with the gel. Color matching is the tough part, but a pro could make the repaired areas disappear. Due to the age of the boat (gel will fade or change color with age and UV exposure) a custom match would be required whether or not the original colors were available.

With the exception of the few major damage areas, I bet the damage doesnt extend very far.

Based on past experiences, I have a strong preference for working with epoxy... far easier to work with and superior strength over vinyl or poly. A quick coat of vinyl resin over any epoxy repairs would be all thats needed for a conversion coat prior to gel. Of course, if youre comfortable working with vinyl, then using it for the repairs would save that one step.

Last edited by TRBenj; 01-03-2013 at 08:40 AM.
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  #73  
Old 01-03-2013, 01:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XtwentyNot View Post
Great thread! I'm from the built not bought camp and have learned the only way to be able to do everything yourself is to roll up your sleeves and go for it.
I find that, while from an hourly standpoint, some of my projects are ludicrous, the satisfaction I get from doing things with my own two hands far outweighs the time I invest into them.
That said take the windshield and snaps off already (is there am echo in here ).
And I re read just to clarify, you did plan on gel coat work. Guess what? Do it yourself! No way you won't be able to pull it off. Get something fiberglass to practice on, whatever it takes. Spraying gel coat is relatively simple, watch YouTube, ask here, and go for it. Re gel as little or as much as you want. But no way you don't spray it yourself! You're already doing all the hard stuff in the prep!

Couldn't have said it better myself. I realize that there are more cost effective, or time efficient ways to get the results I am looking for.

I would also add one other point, you can't put a price on an experience..............as you guys can probably tell this is the first time I have attempted working with fiberglass, and working on restoring a boat. I am an active DIY handyman, and pride myself on my ability to do a very close to professional job when it comes to home renovations. This is the same with my trucks, and other hobbies.

My feeling is that if I can spend a bit of time in my garage learning about my boat and spending time with my family and learning a few new skills that is time better spent than sitting in front of the TV, or whatever frivolous activity you take part in.

The other thought in the back of mind through out all this tear down is, I CAN'T MAKE IT LOOK WORSE!!!!! no matter how many mistakes I make I know that in the end the boat will look 1000% times better than it did.


Thanks everyone for the thoughts. I will try and go back through and answer any questions you have asked.
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  #74  
Old 01-03-2013, 02:59 PM
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Wait did someone say cost effective and boat in the same sentence? lol... It's a labor of love...you are either a true lover of vessels or a user of vessels. nothing bad in either case... College kid you are in the former group... I plan on restoring a slightly worn or worse a S&S to it's former glory one day soon...after my kids are out of the house - which is soon....

Hopefully I will find something in between the pictures below...posted on this forum before...
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  #75  
Old 01-09-2013, 11:26 AM
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Not Much news, I cleaned out the garage of dust, Although I had the tarp up is still got everywhere. I ended up just using a leaf blower and blowing as much as I could out the door. I am sure there is still lots there.

Unfortunatly work has started to get in the way of my progress, so I think it will be a slow and steady go for awhile of working on the little areas when I can grab a minute or two.

As we all know the windshields aren't available any longer and this has stopped me from removing it right away as the safest possible place for it in my mind is right where it is. My plan was always to remove it and hopefully be able to do all the heavy sanding, wet sanding, polishing, waxing, all in one shot and then re install the windshield.

As large chunks of time are less available I am now considering doing the windshield in stages, as I don't have a safe area to store it for long period of time.

Can I remove the side windows and brackets one at a time? or do I need to remove the entire windshield as one piece?
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  #76  
Old 01-09-2013, 11:44 AM
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Yes, good question...
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  #77  
Old 01-10-2013, 01:34 PM
TRBenj TRBenj is online now
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The windshields Ive taken apart really need to be assembled and attached in order to support themselves. Taking one piece off the boat would not only be tricky, but leave the remaining pieces vulnerable to damage. Bump into one, lean against it, heck even under its own weight- I wouldnt trust it.

Just take the whole thing off and break it down into the main pieces, then store it under your bed, with a towel between the pieces.
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  #78  
Old 01-10-2013, 05:59 PM
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"Just take the whole thing off and break it down into the main pieces, then store it under your bed, with a towel between the pieces."


I like that idea, hadn't thought of that!!!!! now can I sneak it into the house past my wife????? lol
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  #79  
Old 02-02-2013, 06:51 PM
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Finally had a chance to do a little work on the project.

I was able to drill out the rivets for the domes earlier in the week and finished sanding down the sides.

Today was the scary part, removing the glass, It went alot better than I thought, although there were a few holy **** moments.

Here are the pictures, I am now at decision time as to what do do about all the brown filler.
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  #80  
Old 02-04-2013, 05:18 PM
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Had a bit more time over this weekend, and a little today.

Did a lot of work wet sanding the larger gouges out of the hull that I can get to (other side is just too close to the wall to work).

I worked through 600 and 800 grit, then as I ran some compound over the top deck to see how I was doing. I finished off by buffing with no product just to bring out the shine a little, and to highlight the areas that need more wet sanding with 1000 and 1500 grit.

I don't plan on doing much more wet sanding till I deal with the patch work, then do a finishing work from the new gel coat and all the other swirl marks at one time.
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