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  #131  
Old 12-17-2012, 07:22 PM
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Thrall Thrall is offline
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Poured concrete typically is more costly for the diy contractor. Mainly cost of formwork combined with access to place the concrete. Unless it's a level pad that you can drive the mixer truck around you pretty much are relegated to pumping the concrete which is costly.
Now combine the cost of pumping and you now need to have enough forms to do the whole basement and garage at once or pumping costs go crazy.
At $3-4/sf/mo form rental (what formwork outfits charge home owners for crappy old forms), the cost goes up pretty quick.
To mediate those costs and still do a poured basement, last house I built, I scheduled the excavation work to coincide with pour days and used the excavator (bucket) to place the concrete. Ended up costing me about 1.5hrs of excavator time per pour, 3 pours. Still less than the cost to pump the whole thing at once. I poured about 2/3 of the bsmt ftgs and walkout ftgs and walls chute dump by leaving a ramp into the basement from the front. Tore the ramp out then did the rest by bucket.
For formwork, I bought enough BB plywood to do about 1/3 of the walls. Took good care of the plywood, then re-used about 80% of the plywood as sub flooring. Since it wasn't t&g plywood I cross sheeted with 1/2" OSB at less than $10/sheet. Ended up with 1-1/4" of flooring for barely any more $ than t&g plywood and since alot of the main level was tile I negated the need for cement board underlayment under the tile.
And I rented a couple barrels of form clamps from a local guy I met at the bar for 2 cases of cheap beer!
If I hadn't jumped thru all those hoops, block walls would have been more economical.
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  #132  
Old 12-17-2012, 08:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thrall View Post
Poured concrete typically is more costly for the diy contractor. Mainly cost of formwork combined with access to place the concrete. Unless it's a level pad that you can drive the mixer truck around you pretty much are relegated to pumping the concrete which is costly.
Now combine the cost of pumping and you now need to have enough forms to do the whole basement and garage at once or pumping costs go crazy.
At $3-4/sf/mo form rental (what formwork outfits charge home owners for crappy old forms), the cost goes up pretty quick.
To mediate those costs and still do a poured basement, last house I built, I scheduled the excavation work to coincide with pour days and used the excavator (bucket) to place the concrete. Ended up costing me about 1.5hrs of excavator time per pour, 3 pours. Still less than the cost to pump the whole thing at once. I poured about 2/3 of the bsmt ftgs and walkout ftgs and walls chute dump by leaving a ramp into the basement from the front. Tore the ramp out then did the rest by bucket.
For formwork, I bought enough BB plywood to do about 1/3 of the walls. Took good care of the plywood, then re-used about 80% of the plywood as sub flooring. Since it wasn't t&g plywood I cross sheeted with 1/2" OSB at less than $10/sheet. Ended up with 1-1/4" of flooring for barely any more $ than t&g plywood and since alot of the main level was tile I negated the need for cement board underlayment under the tile.
And I rented a couple barrels of form clamps from a local guy I met at the bar for 2 cases of cheap beer!
If I hadn't jumped thru all those hoops, block walls would have been more economical.
It's all dependent upon what is prevalent in your area. Block would be double what poured costs in my area. Your last house reminds me of the old days. Here in MA the carpenter would form the entire house using forms made on the site. They used 2 x stock and 1 x 8 rough sawn. Then 100% of the material was used to build the house. The 2 x's for framing and the rough sawn was used as subfloor with the concrete stained side down.
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  #133  
Old 12-18-2012, 06:22 PM
jkski jkski is offline
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Foundation waterproofed and insulated.

We got a couple of dry enough days and the waterproofers were able to do their thing. So, the block is now waterproofed and insulated up to grade, the footer drains are covered with 2 feet of gravel with the footer drain inspection taking place tomorrow. After the inspection we can start to add some additional gravel over the footer drains and backfill up a portion of the foundation as well as most of the garage. The garage will be a bit tricky as we have to fill the inside and outside at the same pace to support the wall......it is good to have friends!
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  #134  
Old 12-18-2012, 07:46 PM
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Thrall Thrall is offline
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Sweet, it's really taking shape now.
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  #135  
Old 12-18-2012, 07:56 PM
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Thrall Thrall is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnE View Post
It's all dependent upon what is prevalent in your area. Block would be double what poured costs in my area. Your last house reminds me of the old days. Here in MA the carpenter would form the entire house using forms made on the site. They used 2 x stock and 1 x 8 rough sawn. Then 100% of the material was used to build the house. The 2 x's for framing and the rough sawn was used as subfloor with the concrete stained side down.
If I was doing a finished basement in a rustic looking house I would totally use random planks for forms and then stain and seal the concrete to make a finished product out of it in a bar/pool room.
Yeah, used all the 2x4s up in the framing afterwards (inside wall plates and misc stuff) as well.
I was bein' green and didn't even know it!
Actually it was just the most economical route. I may not have gotten the best prices on poured fdn or block walls since I knew almost no one in the area when I did the house and the biggest local home builder/lumber yard didn't get the job after they told my parents it would be an 18+ month project to build the house.
They didn't even want to sell me any materials at first unless I sole sourced to them until I sat down with the owner one day, explained the situation and asked him if he would like potentially a little profit from my house or none at all. He decided something was better than nothing and we got along fabulously after that. (I think I was the first person in quite some time to shop the 2 lumber yards in town against each other for every order.)
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  #136  
Old 12-18-2012, 08:11 PM
jkski jkski is offline
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Just curious...how far are you guys filling up your wall with gravel to cover the footer drains? Are you putting in any type of filter fabric on top of the gravel?
Right now I am at 2 feet of gravel over the footer drains (which is code for my area) and while I would like to be able to go up farther, most people who have seen my site say that they would not bother as we set high on a hill and can cut a swayle in to direct any possible water around the house.
Thoughts???
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  #137  
Old 12-18-2012, 08:45 PM
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I'd throw a layer of filter fabric down just as cheap insurance that the fine soil you're backfilling with over the gravel doesn't leach down over time and plug the gravel or worse, the drains.
Site drainage, IMO is one of those thing you can never "over do." The cost/hassle to fix a drainage issue down the road is very prohibitive. (Think tearing out your drive pad or a deck or landscaping just to prepare to make a mess re-excavating.)
If you have ground water I'd consider putting drain board on the foundation walls down to just below the top of the gravel as well. If no ground water, no problem, but the key is to allow ANY water that is going to contact your foundation (especially block) the quickest ride possible back away from the house.
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  #138  
Old 12-18-2012, 09:22 PM
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X2 on the filter fabric. It's required and standard here. I'm fortunate as I had street drainage to tie into. (Granted I'm on a third acre lot) You can't be too careful with the drains. I have my perimeter drain running through a foot of crushed stone with the filter fabric above. The a separate drain piping all the gutters into the street drain. Given your situation, you can drain everything to daylight in the back yard and achieve the same results.
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  #139  
Old 12-18-2012, 10:17 PM
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jkski, don't know if you're on Pintrest or not, but they have a lot of great ideas for homes and interiors, as well as exteriors. Check it out.
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  #140  
Old 12-19-2012, 07:54 AM
jkski jkski is offline
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Thanks for the input guys, more gravel and filter fabric it is then. We are still working out a gameplan for filling the garage so that I do not have issues down the road. Premium-fill keeps winning the battle so it looks like I will be getting pricing today on roughly 200 ton of that, another 60 ton of sand to fill around the outside of the walkout area and just for good measure another 40 ton of washed 57 for backfill drainage..........yep, it's gonna be another expensive day!
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