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  #11  
Old 07-20-2008, 08:18 PM
gerberpollack gerberpollack is offline
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One more thing. Yes, the engine was making a metal rubbing type of sound. Would this indicate the bearings are grinding against each other or the housing? I asked them to look at the blower because I thought it was the cause of the noise.

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  #12  
Old 07-20-2008, 08:24 PM
gerberpollack gerberpollack is offline
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One more thing. Yes, the belt area of the engine was making noise. I asked the mechanic to take a good look at the blower because I thought it was the cause of the noise. The noise sounded like tow pieces of metal rubbing together - higher pitched and gritty. Could this noise be connected to the water pump bearings failing?
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  #13  
Old 07-20-2008, 08:24 PM
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The timing always seems fishy. If you heard metallic scraping, it wouldn't be the blower. When they go bad, it's usually a screeching sound. About the only way they could have affected the raw water pump is by over-tightening the belt and there's no way to determine that unless there's a raw water pump in place. The picture and links show the whole raw water pump, BTW. If the raw water pump was running dry, it could have helped to kill the pump but it it had a good supply of water, two days is kind pf short unless the pump was already on its way out.
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  #14  
Old 07-20-2008, 09:05 PM
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If I remember correctly Indmar had a diagram on their website.
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  #15  
Old 07-20-2008, 09:19 PM
bigmac bigmac is offline
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Hard to imagine how they'd be able to damage the bearing on the raw water pump on an alternator job..it would take quite a whack. The serpentine belt itself isn't attached to the pump - the pump is bolted to the crankshaft pulley and is driven directly from that, although if they replaced the belt, they'd have to remove the raw water pump to do it. I think.
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Old 07-20-2008, 09:30 PM
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bigmac- thanks for clearing up my late afternoon brain fade.
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  #17  
Old 07-20-2008, 09:51 PM
bigmac bigmac is offline
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bigmac- thanks for clearing up my late afternoon brain fade.
And just in time...mine is starting to go too.
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  #18  
Old 07-20-2008, 10:48 PM
gerberpollack gerberpollack is offline
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how does the impeller relate to the water pump? if the inspection noted that the water pump needed to be replaced, does this mean the water wasn't circulating? shouldn't they have told me not to run the boat until it was replaced? seems like a pretty big deal.

yes, there was a screaching, not too loud, when i ran the boat. this was the reason i asked them to check the blower (thinking it was the blower). would most mechanics diagnose the problem if they heard a screaching?
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  #19  
Old 07-20-2008, 11:32 PM
bigmac bigmac is offline
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Originally Posted by gerberpollack View Post
how does the impeller relate to the water pump? if the inspection noted that the water pump needed to be replaced, does this mean the water wasn't circulating? shouldn't they have told me not to run the boat until it was replaced? seems like a pretty big deal.

yes, there was a screaching, not too loud, when i ran the boat. this was the reason i asked them to check the blower (thinking it was the blower). would most mechanics diagnose the problem if they heard a screaching?
The impeller is the flexible rubber thing. It mounts on the shaft and inside the pump housing. The pump housing is mounted to the engine so it doesn't turn. When the engine rotates, the impeller inside the housing turns and that's how it pumps water. The pump shaft is therefore inside the pump housing and mounted in a bearing. If the bearing goes, the pump shaft can overheat, get scored and fracture. When a bearing is gone, you get that grating sound you mention. Most mechanics would be alarmed if they heard that sound. They may not ascribe it immediately to the water pump, but they ought to look for its source.

IMHO, a bad raw water pump should be detected on a pre-sale inspection. If the bearing is gone, then the seal is gone too, and it's likely the pump was leaking water. Now, I don't know over what time course this all happened, but as JimN said, the timing of your raw water pump going right after the sale is...odd.

They didn't tell you the pump needed to be replaced, they told you the impeller needed to be replaced. The impeller is a $30 wear item and is supposed to be automatically replaced every year (according to Indmar) as part of annual maintenance. Maybe they thought that the reason the boat was overheating was that it had a bad impeller, when in reality the whole pump was about to land in the bilge. A new impeller is $30. A new pump is about $180 (comes with impeller IIRC).

I'd have a chat with the selling dealer. Removing and replacing a raw water pump isn't a difficult job for someone who knows how to do it, but I get the impression you've never done that before and you might be better off having a tech do it.
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Last edited by bigmac; 07-20-2008 at 11:39 PM.
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  #20  
Old 07-20-2008, 11:51 PM
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The raw water pump brings water into the motor, since it doesn't have a closed cooling system, like a car. A car uses a lot of air to cool, obviously and a boat doesn't have room for a radiator, so the ones that do have a closed cooling system have a heat exchanger, but even that won't keep the motor cool if the raw water can't cool it. If the impeller is bad, it won't move much water in, and that means the water that's in the motor will eventually boil, which happens at a lower temperature that if it had some kind of coolant like ethylene or propylene glycol, under pressure. With a good impeller, if the bearing is going bad, it will still work, but most times, the seals will fail and you or whoever works on the motor will notice water leaking from the pump, or the bearing will seize and cause the shaft to fail because of heat.

If the inspection noted that the pump needed to be replaced, yes, they should have discussed it before the job was "finished", but how that is addressed is up to the shop. If the customer sets an absolute limit on the amount being spent on service, some shops will just stop there, with no assumption that any additional work will be done. Some servicers use a sort of "rule of thumb" for this, where they will do additional work up to about 15% higher without calling the customer but above that, they make contact. The only down side is that the customer will be spending 15% more than they were expecting but one of the up sides is that if the customer needs the boat by a certain time but can't be contacted for approval, the boat will still be finished instead of having to wait for that approval.

If I had been working on the boat, anything that would have caused a mechanical failure would be discussed when the work order has been completed or the boat is picked up. If the customer would be picking the boat up after hours, they absolutely get a call and I don't rely on anyone to inform the person whose signature is on the work order.

"shouldn't they have told me not to run the boat until it was replaced?" Probably.

Should you have asked them if it could come to this, after reading that the pump needed to be replaced, on the work order? If a part needs to be replaced, you can't generally limp it along for very long, but someone who doesn't work on this kind of thing won't necessarily know that. OTOH, there's generally a place on the work order for the customer's signature, agreeing that the work has been done and another place for their initials, near a place for notes on additional work needed. I don't know what your work order shows, but the common ones have these and it's there to protect you and the shop from "he said- I said" situations.
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