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  #41  
Old 01-01-2014, 06:36 PM
Kweisner's Avatar
Kweisner Kweisner is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MLA View Post
One advantage to having a traditional dual-bank battery switch, is the ability to use the house bank as a backup starting battery. Eliminating that switch in place of a continuous-duty solenoid, prevents this. Just some food for thought. That same solenoid can be used injunction with with switch.
I was under the impression the relay does the same, but check my thinking on this:

When the key is in the OFF or ACC position, the relay is open, thereby separating the batteries. When in the ON or START position, the relay closes, essentially combining both batteries. So when I start my boat, I am pulling 12v from both batts in a parallel circuit.

I guess where the switch differs is that you can engage or disengage the batteries individually vs. the relay which is either separate or combined. So does the switch allow the user to "substitute" either of the batteries into the starting circuit?

Even in that case I'm not sure of the advantage of substitution vs. combining.
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  #42  
Old 01-01-2014, 07:41 PM
MLA MLA is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kweisner View Post
I was under the impression the relay does the same, but check my thinking on this:

When the key is in the OFF or ACC position, the relay is open, thereby separating the batteries. When in the ON or START position, the relay closes, essentially combining both batteries. So when I start my boat, I am pulling 12v from both batts in a parallel circuit.
On paper, this is how the solenoid would work. One thing to consider is that when 2 batteries are combined, they will want to equalize. Meaning the one with the higher charge will flow into the one with the lower static charge. So if one is real low or has totally taken a chit, then combining them through the solenoid means you could end up with 2 batteries too low to crank the engine. `

Quote:
I guess where the switch differs is that you can engage or disengage the batteries individually vs. the relay which is either separate or combined. So does the switch allow the user to "substitute" either of the batteries into the starting circuit?

.
A traditional dual-battery switch is 100% manual. It will allow you to choose to draw/charge from/to battery 1 or battery 2 or combine the banks and draw/charge both. Adding in a solenoid or ACR makes it a manual/passive system.

The ignition key switch only disconnects some of the boat loads from the engine, leaving others to be a parasitic draw. Having an actual battery switch will allow for ALL loads, except the auto bilge, to be isolated from the batteries when off.
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  #43  
Old 01-02-2014, 09:07 AM
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bturner2 bturner2 is offline
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I went with the Blue Seas "Add a Batter Kit". Use the switch to turn off the batteries when I' leave the boat on the Shore Station. The relay sets the charge up as required. What was nice about this kit was that it is a kit and everything is included along with instructions. It was straight forward to install with no guessing. Took about an hour to install not including all the clean up of the existing wiring mess, manufacturing of new cables and installing/mounting new battery trays and batteries. I've been very happy with the results. KISS at it's best.
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  #44  
Old 01-25-2014, 12:49 AM
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_fng_ _fng_ is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bturner2 View Post
I went with the Blue Seas "Add a Batter Kit". Use the switch to turn off the batteries when I' leave the boat on the Shore Station. The relay sets the charge up as required. What was nice about this kit was that it is a kit and everything is included along with instructions. It was straight forward to install with no guessing. Took about an hour to install not including all the clean up of the existing wiring mess, manufacturing of new cables and installing/mounting new battery trays and batteries. I've been very happy with the results. KISS at it's best.
I'm planning on adding the blue seas and read that you may need to buy extra stuff outside of wire such as a bus bar? How much extra wire did the install require? Thanks for the reply.

Last edited by _fng_; 01-25-2014 at 01:07 AM.
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  #45  
Old 01-25-2014, 08:00 AM
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bturner2 bturner2 is offline
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That's going to depend on what your current wiring looks like. Mine was horrible. Not sure how much of it was from the factory or from the "professional" stereo installation that was commissioned by the PO but it was real bad. Non marine rated cable (copper, not tinned copper), multiple direct connections to the battery from the stereo and other options added by the PO made mine a candidate to completely pull it apart and start from scratch. I started a thread on my installation here....

http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/...ad.php?t=29889

The first step in determining what you'll need is to access the installation you currently have. How many wires are currently going directly to your battery? What kind of components were used? What options have been added over time that may not have been installed correctly? Ideally the only cables connected to the battery should be the ground cable to the boats main ground bus bar and the positive cable from the boat's main positive bus bar/breaker and starter circuit. The only exception to that would be for a direct fused connection to a bilge pump.

At a minimum you'll have to make up cables to connect the switch to the batteries, the grounds cables between the two batteries and the ground cable to what should be either a bus bar or terminal post for the boat's main electrical ground. Making cables is easy with some very basic tools (torch, solder, vise and heat gun for dressing the cable ends with shrink tubing) if you plan out your installation and get the right connectors and cable. A lot of us have ordered these components from a company called Genuine Dealz.....

http://www.genuinedealz.com/

For the money you'll save doing this yourself you can afford extra cable and connectors and probably do a much better job than most shops would do. If you don't want to learn how to make the cables Genuine Dealz will make them for you. You'll just need to mock up your installation and use something like a coat hanger to determine the path/length of the cables you'll need made up.

The key as with most projects is to take you time, plan out the installation and get the best materials possible to do the job right. There's always plenty of help here if you need it.
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  #46  
Old 01-25-2014, 08:37 AM
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_fng_ _fng_ is offline
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Awesome reply. The kit should be here shortly and I'll lay it out and get to work.
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  #47  
Old 01-25-2014, 10:03 AM
uplander uplander is offline
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I just checked my batteries since put away, I plugged in my battery maintainer and it ran for about one minute and turned off charge mode.
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