View Single Post
  #132  
Old 03-19-2013, 10:02 AM
TRBenj TRBenj is offline
MC Devotee
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Boat: 1990 Ski Nautique
Location: NWCT
Posts: 1,132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scot View Post
My price on the shaft was using my original coupler, so thats mainly where the savings comes from.
Id be hesitant to reuse the old coupler with a new shaft. You may want to consider getting the coupling refaced with the new shaft so you know the fit is tight and the flange isnt warped.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scot View Post
As for the shaft, we are talking about a few thousandths of run-out where it rides on the bushings. It sits pretty snug in the strut. Is that really that bad? I have ruled out trying to fix this one, its either runable or being replaced. Its obviously taken many years to get to this point and running this way for quite a while.
I dont know what the allowable spec for runout is, but by the way you previously described it, it sounded bad. If its enough to catch a finger nail on, I would not run it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scot View Post
As for your input on the strut alignment, I want to make sure we're on the same page so I get it right. My strut alignment was done with the shaft not coupled to the trans.
Correct.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scot View Post
I positioned it so that it rides as close to center as possible in the log
By this I assume you mean that you located the strut such that the shaft spun freely when centered in the log. If you located the strut while the shaft was allowed to sag under its own weight or otherwise forced to the center of the log (the rubber strut bushing allows for some "squish") then that is not correct.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scot View Post
and plan to align the motor/trans to where the shaft rides free and centered in the strut. This seemed to make the most sense to me since the log was the only good reference point I had for my alignment considering the motor, trans, and strut were all off.
It sounds like you did it correctly- just confirming. You want to align the powertrain to where the shaft spins freely. This may or may not be when the shaft is centered in the log. That is the appropriate reference point when aligning the strut- the goal would be to get the shaft perfectly centered in the log where it spins freely, but a little bit off here is fine (so long as its not rubbing the log). The important thing is powertrain to strut alignment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scot View Post
Also, when I had the trans out the shaft would easily pop out by pushing forward out of the strut and then pulling it out of the log. Now it can only go back and it binds against the rudder when it goes that way. Am I missing something here or is there an easy way to get it out? It was the same way before my manipulation of the strut.
I am not totally following whats going on here. Are you saying that due to the new strut location, the shaft hits the rudder when trying to install/remove from the rear?
Reply With Quote