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Old 04-27-2012, 03:24 PM
jamisonsbrodie jamisonsbrodie is offline
TT Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Boat: 1990 PS 190, 02 Wakesetter VLX
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 458
Quote:
Originally Posted by east tx skier View Post
I was in the process of adding a lot to my post above after you responded, but the way I understand it, width is going to have more of an effect on how much damage wind can do with rollers than length. 2,000' is fine, but I know people with 2,000' lakes that wish they had more room to get up and running. Of course, make it too long and you are burning more gas per set. With 2,000' and 55m buoys, you have 393' on either side to get up and running. It's enough, but in a perfect world, I'd love another 100 feet or so on each side.

Unless you are doing turn-arounds at the end of the course, I still think turn islands are more trouble than they're worth. It's easier to just not do down and backs or turn-arounds, but rather, drop at each end. That's just me. Dropping is my preference anyway. As for depth, if drought is possible, go deep out to the balls. We had a horrible drought here last summer, but a local ski school kept skiing because his lake was cut 12' deep out to the turn balls. If you are on a well or a spring, you can afford to go shallower. But with shallower water comes the ability for sunlight to reach the bottom, making vegetation more likely. Lots of trade offs there.
225-250 is ideal through the center of the course, but needs to be wider on the ends to get the proper slope and turning radius regardless of island or not. The turn island helps with not only the continuous turn-arounds, but also when you drop, because you take off heading away from the course and go around the island before you head down course, which eliminates the possibility of bow rollers (which are ever so present in MC's. ETS, you don't have to worry about bow rollers because fortunately your current boat doesn't have them). FWIW, I too prefer to drop and do so 99.9% of the time

Also, The deeper you go out to the balls, the wider the lake has to be to get the proper slope.

The biggest tournament lake around here is 300 by 2200 with no turn islands and it gets blown out alot. It sits right next to one that is 225 down the center, 300 on the ends (with turn islands) and 2000 feet long and it gets much more use.

Last edited by jamisonsbrodie; 04-27-2012 at 03:58 PM.
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